View Poll Results: Are you handing your phone in

Voters
70. You may not vote on this poll
  • Already handed it over.

    23 32.86%
  • Probably going to hand it in.

    28 40.00%
  • Na, she'll be right mate.

    19 27.14%
09-15-2016 03:40 PM
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  1. metz65's Avatar
    They initiated a recall, they told everyone it's possible it can explode, at this point it's like someone playing Russian roulette. Who's to blame? The gun manufacturer or the person that put the bullet in it and pulled the trigger.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-13-2016 12:39 PM
  2. rushmore's Avatar
    Well, I am using mine until replacements are available. Samsung's statement though about pressured layers suggests adverse compression during the cell build process. That production process has very little tolerance after set-up, so IF that is the reason for the failures as Samsung now thinks, almost all devices should have already failed or went boom. You would also be having a lot of battery heat and the device will not be cool for weeks and suddenly boom.

    The more Samsung communicates, the more they seem to not really know what it is. That is likely bad news if the CPSC audit also get that sense as well. Seems a miracle for this to resolved in less than a month for current Note 7 owners.

    Whatever the case, a lot people are going to get fired and laid off to offset the cost, sales loss and to restore honor at Samsung.
    09-13-2016 12:43 PM
  3. rushmore's Avatar
    They initiated a recall, they told everyone it's possible it can explode, at this point it's like someone playing Russian roulette. Who's to blame? The gun manufacturer or the person that put the bullet in it and pulled the trigger.
    At least instead of six chambers there are several thousand Joking aside, makes no sense based on the issue Samsung now states is the problem for the cell to run normal for weeks and then get hot and explode. It should be hot almost out of box from first charge onward until it either stops working or fries.

    Samsung seems to be going the wrong direction as each day goes by. Hopefully just poor perception on my part and everything will be resolved next week

    Sadly (if this drags into next month), I could end up buying a $400 64GB MXPE again and moving on. I gave my other MXPE to my son.
    09-13-2016 12:51 PM
  4. Xenuprime's Avatar
    Mine has done this twice now. Got to around 40% and died. I am going to stop using it now and call Costco to see what will happen if I get the S7E now and want the Note when it comes in. I don't want to be listed as a "new" N7 customer and get put at the back of the line and I don't want any hassle with the 14 day return on the S7E.
    09-13-2016 12:53 PM
  5. Aquila's Avatar
    ...is total number sold, not just "defective". No one knows how many are defective.
    No, the number sold IS the number that are defective. It's 100% of the devices not created for resale in China that are defective. So if you have a device, anywhere in the world, that was not created to be sold only in China, it is defective. A = B.
    09-13-2016 12:57 PM
  6. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    Ask for a manager if they don't play nicely at the CS desk.
    Mine has done this twice now. Got to around 40% and died. I am going to stop using it now and call Costco to see what will happen if I get the S7E now and want the Note when it comes in. I don't want to be listed as a "new" N7 customer and get put at the back of the line and I don't want any hassle with the 14 day return on the S7E.
    09-13-2016 12:58 PM
  7. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    You weren't wrong. It was awful. I'll admit it's gotten a lot better. I still use a different launcher, though.
    I personally thought TouchWiz was awful.
    09-13-2016 01:02 PM
  8. Aquila's Avatar
    They initiated a recall, they told everyone it's possible it can explode, at this point it's like someone playing Russian roulette. Who's to blame? The gun manufacturer or the person that put the bullet in it and pulled the trigger.
    Except in this case it's not playing Russian Roulette with a revolver, it's playing with an automatic. Or if you want to keep the revolver, every single chamber is loaded.
    09-13-2016 01:04 PM
  9. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    The source article references ALL Note 7s ..
    The wording of the source article is unclear on that point. But if the fix is limited to Korea, then Samsung is making a blunder of providing a publicized safety fix in one market and not worldwide.
    09-13-2016 01:06 PM
  10. LeoRex's Avatar
    No, the number sold IS the number that are defective. It's 100% of the devices not created for resale in China that are defective. So if you have a device, anywhere in the world, that was not created to be sold only in China, it is defective. A = B.
    THIS....

    The battery itself was not built correctly, so every pack that came out of that plant is at a high risk of doing its best Drogon impression. They wouldn't have recalled every single phone if it was only a certain batch, or limited to a particular day's run, etc. Its ALL Note 7s. That every one still being used hasn't failed is most likely just a matter of the luck of the draw....
    09-13-2016 01:06 PM
  11. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    Not necessarily, imo. There are batteries that are fine out there. And the site that produced them has likely been ramping up production. The phones are also being made and were being made. As long as the new phones get the batteries from the good manufacturer (not Samsung SDI) then for most this will be fairly quick. For the US, with the CPSC involved it could take a lot longer. That's why some are already going out to other countries. We're just quite scre#$@ here.
    which likely means devices staged are not going to cut it either and new production would be needed.
    09-13-2016 01:07 PM
  12. boufa's Avatar
    Why do people keep pushing their agenda and opinions on other people? If someone weighs the risk and doesn't want to spend money on another phone, why does it matter? It's their choice.

    The CDC estimates that 48 million people get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die from foodborne diseases each year. Should everyone stop eating food?
    As an "Ambassador" you might want to be careful. AC has stated that Return it Now is the only acceptable official position coming from the site.
    09-13-2016 01:10 PM
  13. Aquila's Avatar
    The wording of the source article is unclear on that point. But if the fix is limited to Korea, then Samsung is making a blunder of providing a publicized safety fix in one market and not worldwide.
    This isn't a fix. This is to discourage people from continuing to use the device because the device is dangerous. That encourages them to turn it in and use a loaner or backup or replacement.
    09-13-2016 01:10 PM
  14. Jona005's Avatar
    Not necessarily, imo. There are batteries that are fine out there. And the site that produced them has likely been ramping up production. The phones are also being made and were being made. As long as the new phones get the batteries from the good manufacturer (not Samsung SDI) then for most this will be fairly quick. For the US, with the CPSC involved it could take a lot longer. That's why some are already going out to other countries. We're just quite scre#$@ here.

    It seems like it should be that the CPSC/government should either be approving the internals/battery or not. Forgive me for the conspiracy theory, but here's to hoping it's not an opportunity to put some err..NSA apps..on the phone.
    09-13-2016 01:11 PM
  15. Aquila's Avatar
    As an "Ambassador" you might want to be careful. AC has stated that Return it Now is the only acceptable official position coming from the site.
    Who said that?
    Strong_Genetics likes this.
    09-13-2016 01:12 PM
  16. boufa's Avatar
    What if the Galaxy Note 7 doesn't get approve? Then what? Stay with the S7 Edge or switch to another phone like the iPhone 7 Plus? I want my Note 7 back already.
    What if the sky falls... what Iif I get hit by a truck before the official re-release....

    The phones are being produced already. The government will very likely approve them as is. "Hey we had a battery problem... and we fixed it... here are the details our engineers found out" .. Government... "OK looks good, go ahead" It is nearly that simple. 2 weeks max.
    09-13-2016 01:13 PM
  17. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    This isn't a fix. This is to discourage people from continuing to use the device because the device is dangerous. That encourages them to turn it in and use a loaner or backup or replacement.
    Correct.

    This is only a precautionary measure meant to encourage people to return their device and also to make the potential effects slightly less harmful if it does blow as it's not storing as much power.

    It does not resolve the core issue that's the cause of this whole debacle, which is a manufacturing fault, which does not make this a "fix".
    09-13-2016 01:14 PM
  18. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    This isn't a fix. This is to discourage people from continuing to use the device because the device is dangerous. That encourages them to turn it in and use a loaner or backup or replacement.
    It is a technical fix. You may see it as some type of corporate harassment, but the idea is to prevent complete charging. If Samsung wanted to make you angry, they would just force all the Note 7 phones into emergency mode.

    Anyway my point was that Samsung either should do this everywhere or nowhere.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-13-2016 01:14 PM
  19. Aquila's Avatar
    It is a technical fix. You may see it as some type of corporate harassment, but the idea is to prevent complete charging. If Samsung wanted to make you angry, they would just force all the Note 7 phones into emergency mode.

    Anyway my point was that Samsung either should do this everywhere or nowhere.
    This "fix" will not stop the combustion of defective batteries should they decide to go. I don't disagree that it could be pushed globally but I think there are logistical issues that prevent that or it probably would have already happened.
    09-13-2016 01:16 PM
  20. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Here's the thing.

    As long as our devices are powered by lithium batteries, there will always be a chance of them combusting either due to bad charging or damage. Sure, the risk is pretty low, but the risk is definitely there.

    In the case of the Note7, a manufacturing fault somewhere either at Samsung SDI or ITM caused these batteries to have a higher-than-normal chance of combusting out of nowhere, and as these batteries make up a large majority of Note7s produced, Samsung had no other choice but to recall all of those.

    Apparently, they're switching their main supplier to Amperex Technology Limited, a Hong Kong-based company owned by Japanese firm TDK, which supplies the battery packs from its Chinese factory for Note7 units destined for the Chinese market, which doesn't seem to have the issue plaguing the others. Assuming their manufacturing is in order, the post-recall Note7s should have a rate of battery combustion that's in-line with other phones.

    Another thing is that ever since the Note7 recall, battery fires seem to be getting more traction in the mainstream media. Previously, there were other battery fires, from those Xiaomis, to a OnePlus One, a Motorola, an LG and some iPhones too, but they didn't really get much attention at the time.
    Ry and Aquila like this.
    09-13-2016 01:20 PM
  21. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    In the US they are. Other countries don't necessarily have the same setup that we do.
    It seems like it should be that the CPSC/government should either be approving the internals/battery or not.
    09-13-2016 01:25 PM
  22. Xenuprime's Avatar
    I just talked to the Costco wireless guy and he said I can come in, return the Note, then buy an S7E, then within 14 days exchange that for a Note 7 (if they are back). I pointed out that Samsung has said replacements will be given out before any new sales are allowed and he said I would still be considered a replacement. We both agreed Samsung would have a hard time enforcing this anyways, especially at a 3rd party like Costco). I am about to chat with Samsung and see if they can confirm. So, the question for me now is, will the replacements come in within 2 weeks?

    Edit: I just chatted with Samsung and was told Samsung would not exchange the S7E for a new N7 after the switch if I had purchased from them, but since I bought it through Costco, if they allowed it (Costco), then I can do it. He also said they are expecting CPSC approval soon.
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-13-2016 01:28 PM
  23. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    As an "Ambassador" you might want to be careful. AC has stated that Return it Now is the only acceptable official position coming from the site.
    Please point me to this only acceptable official position.

    Calling someone's decision to use a phone foolish is pushing an opinion and was the basis for my comment.
    09-13-2016 01:48 PM
  24. spridell's Avatar
    Remember techincally there HAS NOT been an Official Recall yet from CPSC.

    Last statement we heard last week from CPSC was :

    "CPSC and Samsung are working cooperatively to formally announce an official recall of the devices, as soon as possible. CPSC is working quickly to determine whether a replacement Galaxy Note7 is an acceptable remedy for Samsung or their phone carriers to provide to consumers."


    It just has that feeling that this will take a much longer time then we all think
    rushmore likes this.
    09-13-2016 02:07 PM
  25. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    Started with Apple I think. They made a cult following with the iPhone, and like yin and yang, it gave rise to haters lol. Seems to be dying down like any fad and people care significantly less about branding than they did 3 years ago, from what I can see. Android and iOS converging to some extent probably made it easier.
    But Apple didn't start anything. Customers did. All they did was put out products. Apple pretty much ignores all competition. But Samsung on the other hand takes shots and Apple and mocks them in their ads. Both sides have fans that are way overboard. But in terms of the companies themselves, Apple doesn't do or say anything that promotes that behavior. Whereas Android partners do. And not just against apple but against each other. Motorola couldn't resist taking a shot at Samsung. Meanwhile, Apple has said nothing.
    09-13-2016 02:24 PM
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