09-18-2016 12:31 PM
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  1. trucksmoveamerica#AC's Avatar
    2 weeks from now it will all be forgotten at airlines, subways etc.
    I think Samsung needed the government to ok the replacement so airlines allow them in future a
    09-15-2016 08:02 PM
  2. Bbarbie's Avatar
    I must say I'm surprised the government approved so fast because there was speculation that they will delay it all. Phew thank goodness!
    scottishlassy likes this.
    09-15-2016 08:43 PM
  3. Jewels81's Avatar
    Woooooo-hooooooo😄
    scottishlassy likes this.
    09-15-2016 08:53 PM
  4. kadinldg's Avatar
    Some interesting info at Recode. Of the 1 million Note 7s sold in the US, fewer than 130,000 have been turned in prior to the official recall today.

    Fewer than 15 percent of the one million U.S. Galaxy Note 7 phones have been returned - Recode
    jlczl likes this.
    09-15-2016 08:59 PM
  5. hoangking's Avatar
    You might currious why the Note7 so easy to exploded and why Lithium Battery is easy ignite fire. you should watch this video to understand why:
    09-15-2016 08:59 PM
  6. soulsmilen's Avatar
    Some interesting info at Recode. Of the 1 million Note 7s sold in the US, fewer than 130,000 have been turned in prior to the official recall today.

    Fewer than 15 percent of the one million U.S. Galaxy Note 7 phones have been returned - Recode
    Of course.. There was no definitive replacement timeline so it makes sense. As much as I give in to caution, there was no way they were getting my phone without a clear plan and date. I did, however, power it down and go back to my N4 in the interim. It 's just a number, and there's no way to interpret how many were still being used.

    Many others didn't have luck with returning or exchanging, couldn't due to driving distance, etc etc. There are many reasons. I'm just glad we're on the way to recovery now, and like was said already, we can now get back to tech info, advice, tweaking, and such.

    In short... Woohoo!
    09-15-2016 09:09 PM
  7. Ry's Avatar
    I expect that they'll start blocking service on the affected IMEIs after next week to force those that haven't returned them...
    And they should.
    09-15-2016 09:17 PM
  8. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    You're misreading the Samsung site.

    Overheating is the result of the failure, not the cause. Your own experience proves that. You can't simply cool the phone back down and the problem goes away. Once the failure happens that's it. It can't be stopped.

    You just experienced, well, something else. But it wasn't the issue that caused this recall.
    Well, again, I believe you are stating an opinion, especially where you say, "Once the failure happens that's it. It can't be stopped." and that, "You just experienced, well, something else."... Further, I am reading the website exactly as it's written.

    But I do agree you're at least partially correct... General overheating is a result of the plates in the battery being under too much pressure to begin with, which is what the manufacturing defect has been reported to be. It seems reasonable therefore, to conclude that continued overheating will very likely result in one of the short-circuit failure scenarios that causes meltdown/fire/exploding kittens!

    I absolutely believe that Heat is definitely not your friend, here... :-) So for you to say that no amount of cooling can prevent an explosion is, IMO, not entirely accurate. (BTW, I'm not a battery expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I recently stayed at a Holiday Inn... and I do have a degree in Electronics Engineering Technology, so I'm not a complete dummy, either. Well, at least most of the time LOL, because my phone is still on!)

    There are other possibilities, (some where heat is a contributing factor, some not) and from what I've read, (you can Google to your heart's content here) they all stem from the battery plates being under too much pressure from this manufacturing defect - there will likely be more when this is all over, but some possible scenarios for failure from this defect include:

    1.) When lithium ion batteries are continually trickle charged, the lithium ions can start to cover the surface of the negative contact in a coating of lithium metal through a process called "plating." And in extreme conditions, that lithium metal can form tiny spikes (called "dendrites") that can poke right through the separator, creating -- you guessed it -- a short circuit. (this one would not be heat-related)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    2.) ...perhaps Samsung simply pressed so hard that the positive and negative terminals poked right through the separator and managed to touch... (not heat-related, either)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    3.) ...Or perhaps it's the sponge-like separator itself that got squished. Normally, says Sadoway, the separator allows the liquid electrolyte to pass through pores connecting the negative and positive sides of the battery, even as it keeps the two terminals separate. "If they press really hard, they constrict the pores, the resistance goes up and you generate more heat," says the professor. (heat-related)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    4.) What if only part of the battery was squished improperly, so that the phone couldn't tell when it was 100 percent charged, and kept on charging the cell? (heat-related due to overcharging)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    So, I'm going to say that it is highly likely that I did stop, by cooling, a potential "failure in progress" through nothing more than just plain dumb luck (or, as I prefer to believe, the intervention of YHVH!). Yes, cooling did not fix the manufacturing defect that is still there, (the battery plates under too much pressure) but it hasn't short-circuited and failed yet, just like the other 99.99% of the 1 million GN7 users in the USA. So, in all likelihood, I will make it until next week until my new GN7 arrives. :-)

    I would still take these odds in Vegas any time! :-) Thanks for your time. I hope that some of the detail is helpful, and I look forward to the day (like many of you, I would imagine) where this will be a long-forgotten topic...
    msndrstood likes this.
    09-15-2016 09:27 PM
  9. soldier45's Avatar
    Hopefully will be able to replace mine this weekend at BB. I will take any color thats in stock at this point. Still the best phone out including the Iphone 7.

    09-15-2016 09:34 PM
  10. rushmore's Avatar
    There are no precautions other than turning it off and not using it or charging it and even that isn't foolproof. The quote about them overheating does not say they overheating and then combustion occurs, it is referring to overheating as a nice way of saying that the device can burn. I'm glad you're feeling lucky buy the odds are not 100 in a million, they're about 100 confirmed to have catastrophic manifestations of a failure that exists in every single one of them.

    As as indicated in all the other threads that people chose to argue odds, the confirmation number is likely around 8% of those that include confirmed, unconfirmed and unreported. And that is only the number that failed catastrophically. Those that failed in less spectacular fashion would be an even higher number still. If 92 is 8% of the real catastrophic presenters and those are a tenth of all presenters then we'd be looking at nearly 10,000 presented failures out of the 400,000 or so that made it into consumer hands.

    That changes the odds to 1 in 40 - and the 40 is still too high given that many of the 400,000 have already been returned. But even saying only 10% were returned, you're left with 1 out of 36. Those are good odds to you when being wrong can mean loss of property, health or life? Especially given that yours IS one of those ones, so your odds on your personal device are 1 in 1.

    But for everyone who liked knowing the 1 in 36 presenter figure and compare that to the 97% are bad figure that Samsung released and the fact that they're recalling 100% ... There are no precautions listed that can help mitigate. That was simply not part of any official statement given to date.
    Well, it appears the majority of people decided to risk it, since most people decided to keep and use their Note 7s based on usage trends published today (minimal change from pre ban) and local Verizon, plus two Best Buys stated the same. Not buying the 100 fires (if referring to fires) The only ones public have been the same events regurgitated over and over with no validation. The others in the news were discredited.

    1 in 40 is inherently false based on the hundreds of thousands still using theirs. There should be thousands of Jeeps and garages up in flames. Probably a few zeppelins too.

    Samsung is playing it safe. About two billion worth of safe. I'm not minimizing the issue, but pointing out most kept their Notes.
    09-15-2016 09:46 PM
  11. dvarapala's Avatar
    I noticed that the battery in that video caught fire even though it was completely disconnected from the phone (i.e. it was not being charged, nor was any current being drawn from it). It seems that, if the barrier between anode and cathode ruptures, you're not safe even if your phone is powered off.
    09-15-2016 09:48 PM
  12. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    Well, again, I believe you are stating an opinion, especially where you say, "Once the failure happens that's it. It can't be stopped." and that, "You just experienced, well, something else."... Further, I am reading the website exactly as it's written.

    But I do agree you're at least partially correct... General overheating is a result of the plates in the battery being under too much pressure to begin with, which is what the manufacturing defect has been reported to be. It seems reasonable therefore, to conclude that continued overheating will very likely result in one of the short-circuit failure scenarios that causes meltdown/fire/exploding kittens!

    I absolutely believe that Heat is definitely not your friend, here... :-) So for you to say that no amount of cooling can prevent an explosion is, IMO, not entirely accurate. (BTW, I'm not a battery expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I recently stayed at a Holiday Inn... and I do have a degree in Electronics Engineering Technology, so I'm not a complete dummy, either. Well, at least most of the time LOL, because my phone is still on!)

    There are other possibilities, (some where heat is a contributing factor, some not) and from what I've read, (you can Google to your heart's content here) they all stem from the battery plates being under too much pressure from this manufacturing defect - there will likely be more when this is all over, but some possible scenarios for failure from this defect include:

    1.) When lithium ion batteries are continually trickle charged, the lithium ions can start to cover the surface of the negative contact in a coating of lithium metal through a process called "plating." And in extreme conditions, that lithium metal can form tiny spikes (called "dendrites") that can poke right through the separator, creating -- you guessed it -- a short circuit. (this one would not be heat-related)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    2.) ...perhaps Samsung simply pressed so hard that the positive and negative terminals poked right through the separator and managed to touch... (not heat-related, either)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    3.) ...Or perhaps it's the sponge-like separator itself that got squished. Normally, says Sadoway, the separator allows the liquid electrolyte to pass through pores connecting the negative and positive sides of the battery, even as it keeps the two terminals separate. "If they press really hard, they constrict the pores, the resistance goes up and you generate more heat," says the professor. (heat-related)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    4.) What if only part of the battery was squished improperly, so that the phone couldn't tell when it was 100 percent charged, and kept on charging the cell? (heat-related due to overcharging)
    https://www.cnet.com/news/why-is-sam...g-overheating/

    So, I'm going to say that it is highly likely that I did stop, by cooling, a potential "failure in progress" through nothing more than just plain dumb luck (or, as I prefer to believe, the intervention of YHVH!). Yes, cooling did not fix the manufacturing defect that is still there, (the battery plates under too much pressure) but it hasn't short-circuited and failed yet, just like the other 99.99% of the 1 million GN7 users in the USA. So, in all likelihood, I will make it until next week until my new GN7 arrives. :-)

    I would still take these odds in Vegas any time! :-) Thanks for your time. I hope that some of the detail is helpful, and I look forward to the day (like many of you, I would imagine) where this will be a long-forgotten topic...
    You posted a bunch of speculation to be honest. Educated speculation, but still speculation.

    Some of those things only happen over long periods of time.

    I think what's happening is people are blaming anything heat related on this battery explosion problem, but in reality they're different things.

    Without the explosions there would be no recall. Without the recall the heat issues would just be warranty swaps or repairs. You know, "normal" battery issues.
    juliesdroidsync likes this.
    09-15-2016 09:54 PM
  13. coolbreeze78's Avatar
    You might currious why the Note7 so easy to exploded and why Lithium Battery is easy ignite fire. you should watch this video to understand why:

    Dude your link is a ripoff (and a poor one at that) of this link. You trying to get hits off of the original video or something? If so, at least fix your audio. It's unlistenable. And good luck with YouTube fortunes.

    09-15-2016 09:55 PM
  14. Strong_Genetics's Avatar
    I noticed that the battery in that video caught fire even though it was completely disconnected from the phone (i.e. it was not being charged, nor was any current being drawn from it). It seems that, if the barrier between anode and cathode ruptures, you're not safe even if your phone is powered off.
    Maybe that's why FedEx is refusing to transport the recalled phones
    09-15-2016 09:55 PM
  15. rushmore's Avatar
    I noticed that the battery in that video caught fire even though it was completely disconnected from the phone (i.e. it was not being charged, nor was any current being drawn from it). It seems that, if the barrier between anode and cathode ruptures, you're not safe even if your phone is powered off.
    Appears same burn location on all, so far. This suggests same over-pressed point when bonding the cell layers. How they could miss this and why no lot control with unique serial numbers for each battery/ device seems nuts.
    jbcatl likes this.
    09-15-2016 09:59 PM
  16. coolbreeze78's Avatar
    Maybe that's why FedEx is refusing to transport the recalled phones
    Yep, this is it. Everyone is all "disable fast charging!, limit to 60%! etc!"

    None of this works. Will it make you feel smart and safe? Sure, I guess. Fact is, once that barrier is breached, boomsies. You have a problem.

    I'm guessing if you want to become a local evening news celebrity, just press firmly on the phone from front/back (squeeze with fingers) right where the battery is located.

    Make the news and possibly an ER trip? Cool, probably.

    (don't do this...)
    LeoRex likes this.
    09-15-2016 09:59 PM
  17. calicocat2010's Avatar
    This is WONDERFUL news!!!

    I just hope that since I pre-ordered the device BEFORE the recall and never actually got to use it, that I can just pick up my replacement and not have to do the pre-order all over again.
    09-15-2016 10:15 PM
  18. jlczl's Avatar
    How many Note 7 phones have actually exploded like in Kaboom? Most of them have just overheated and a few have caused fires but actually exploding? A bit of sensationalism has been going on here.
    09-15-2016 10:18 PM
  19. Aquila's Avatar
    The batteries explode, not the device itself.
    09-15-2016 10:18 PM
  20. DasWindows's Avatar
    Git an email and missed a while day of forum posts, so not going back, but it seems like we will get new ones on the 21st.

    So we came stop asking now?
    Strong_Genetics likes this.
    09-15-2016 10:31 PM
  21. mhinc's Avatar
    Git an email and missed a while day of forum posts, so not going back, but it seems like we will get new ones on the 21st.

    So we came stop asking now?
    Were you drunk when you wrote that post?
    09-15-2016 10:33 PM
  22. alwilliam's Avatar
    So my question is...how will the airlines, subways, etc... know you have a new phone?
    As far as I know there's no official ban on the Note 7. It's impossible. Are they going to inspect every person, every bags, luggage if you have a Note 7? Are they going to have personnel in every subway turnstile to do the search?
    Most likely the replacement phones will have a marking of some kind. I think it was posted in this forum a few days ago, forgot which thread it was under.

    I posted in another thread, that we were just in NY this past weekend for the September 11 memorial ceremonies. I took NJ Transit, the Path trains, the NY Subway system and my phone was in plain view. I was charging it with a Jackberry portable battery, watching videos, used the phone itself to pay for tickets and show it to the conductors with the NJT app. On the way back, another passenger was charging his Note 7 right on a train outlet by the door in plain view of the conductors. Not a word was said about the phone, excepts for us making jokes about it.

    I'm pretty sure by next month, consumer affairs will force carriers to put a stop on all Notes 7s that have not been returned.
    09-15-2016 10:40 PM
  23. calicocat2010's Avatar
    As far as I know there's no official ban on the Note 7. It's impossible. Are they going to inspect every person, every bags, luggage if you have a Note 7? Are they going to have personnel in every subway turnstile to do the search?
    Most likely the replacement phones will have a marking of some kind. I think it was posted in this forum a few days ago, forgot which thread it was under.

    I posted in another thread, that we were just in NY this past weekend for the September 11 memorial ceremonies. I took NJ Transit, the Path trains, the NY Subway system and my phone was in plain view. I was charging it with a Jackberry portable battery, watching videos, used the phone itself to pay for tickets and show it to the conductors with the NJT app. On the way back, another passenger was charging his Note 7 right on a train outlet by the door in plain view of the conductors. Not a word was said about the phone, excepts for us making jokes about it.

    I'm pretty sure by next month, consumer affairs will force carriers to put a stop on all Notes 7s that have not been returned.
    TSA should just add a third? line for ONLY passengers with a NOTE 7. That way it doesn't interfere with the rest of the protocols for all the other lines.
    09-15-2016 10:46 PM
  24. maf113's Avatar
    Well, it appears the majority of people decided to risk it, since most people decided to keep and use their Note 7s based on usage trends published today (minimal change from pre ban) and local Verizon, plus two Best Buys stated the same. Not buying the 100 fires (if referring to fires) The only ones public have been the same events regurgitated over and over with no validation. The others in the news were discredited.

    1 in 40 is inherently false based on the hundreds of thousands still using theirs. There should be thousands of Jeeps and garages up in flames. Probably a few zeppelins too.

    Samsung is playing it safe. About two billion worth of safe. I'm not minimizing the issue, but pointing out most kept their Notes.
    Not so sure that a majority of those that kept their N7 kept using it. I for one broke out my backup phone and put the N7 away. I was waiting for new devices to come in or Sept 30 which ever came first.
    fwinst likes this.
    09-15-2016 10:55 PM
  25. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    As far as I know there's no official ban on the Note 7. It's impossible. Are they going to inspect every person, every bags, luggage if you have a Note 7? Are they going to have personnel in every subway turnstile to do the search?
    Most likely the replacement phones will have a marking of some kind. I think it was posted in this forum a few days ago, forgot which thread it was under.

    I posted in another thread, that we were just in NY this past weekend for the September 11 memorial ceremonies. I took NJ Transit, the Path trains, the NY Subway system and my phone was in plain view. I was charging it with a Jackberry portable battery, watching videos, used the phone itself to pay for tickets and show it to the conductors with the NJT app. On the way back, another passenger was charging his Note 7 right on a train outlet by the door in plain view of the conductors. Not a word was said about the phone, excepts for us making jokes about it.

    I'm pretty sure by next month, consumer affairs will force carriers to put a stop on all Notes 7s that have not been returned.
    Samsung Galaxy Note 7 recall: Everything you need to know http://www.androidcentral.com/samsun...-note-7-recall

    The FAA has officially advised against using or charging the Note 7 while on flights, and now that the CPSC has officially recalled the phone it's actually illegal to do so.
    09-15-2016 11:09 PM
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