09-28-2016 02:00 PM
36 12
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  1. Chitown28's Avatar
    Im wondering if you guys are training your batteries by letting it go down to like 15-20% and then charging to 100% for the first week or so that way your battery can hold charge/last longer or is this a myth? Does this help or its not needed?
    09-23-2016 01:35 PM
  2. 05GT's Avatar
    Nope use it throw it on the charger whenever needed.
    keepnitreel and Wiley_11 like this.
    09-23-2016 01:38 PM
  3. Almeuit's Avatar
    Im wondering if you guys are training your batteries by letting it go down to like 15-20% and then charging to 100% for the first week or so that way your battery can hold charge/last longer or is this a myth? Does this help or its not needed?
    It is actually more harmful to do that. Back in the day you needed to do this but not with today's batteries.
    09-23-2016 01:52 PM
  4. Chitown28's Avatar
    wow really? so just charge it whenever I like?
    jimd1050 likes this.
    09-24-2016 01:19 AM
  5. KupKrazy's Avatar
    I think that was really for the old Ni-Cad and even Nickel Metal Hydride batteries, but you don't do that with Lithium-ion batteries which most if not all cell phones today use. However, I've heard some people say that Lithium-ion batteries also have some memory effect to some extent. Not sure if true.
    09-24-2016 01:35 AM
  6. Omlu Omlu's Avatar
    From what I've read, heat is the biggest killer of current phone batteries, not charging habits.
    rushmore and WalkingHorse like this.
    09-24-2016 06:41 AM
  7. boufa's Avatar
    Your battery will outlive your device. Don't worry about any of it.
    eohm1234 likes this.
    09-24-2016 07:01 AM
  8. soulsmilen's Avatar
    Your battery will outlive your device. Don't worry about any of it.
    This is mostly true for people that upgrade at least every 2 years. Beyond that, there is significant decline.
    09-24-2016 08:19 AM
  9. rushmore's Avatar
    There is no built in chemical or binary/chip supported algorithm that uses regression for the battery to learn

    As Omlu points out, heat is a battery's worst enemy and a reason I do not think fast or wireless charging is prudent with a sealed battery for the long term. Both are handy, but not going to optimize long term battery life. If swapping phones out every year though- should be little harm no foul- Except to the person that gets the used phone after the year.
    09-24-2016 08:51 AM
  10. rushmore's Avatar
    wow really? so just charge it whenever I like?
    Yep
    09-24-2016 08:54 AM
  11. rushmore's Avatar
    Your battery will outlive your device. Don't worry about any of it.
    If you mean in regards to a person moving on to another device, agreed. The battery though will choke before the hardware does. This is why OEs are moving to sealed batteries, since if you can replace it you will keep it longer. Still a LOT of Note 3 and 4s active.

    OE's and carriers/retailers want consumers to turn devices every two years (as an aggregate). This drives the biggest margin products: accessorie$ and new warrantie$

    A key reason LG is sticking with replaceable batteries is they get that chunk/niche of customers wanting the feature. Free markets FTW!

    Of course, with LG's power sucking displays (V20 included), the replaceable battery is handy to needed.
    09-24-2016 09:01 AM
  12. spasell's Avatar
    This is mostly true for people that upgrade at least every 2 years. Beyond that, there is significant decline.
    I have a Note 3. I have NOT used a different battery. Now granted after 2 years I stopped using, shut it down, went to N5.

    However I used it again recently. ZERO difference in battery from when I last stopped using it. None. I charged it right up and usef it as normal.

    Battery life and what you should do has a lot of myth and misunderstanding.
    09-24-2016 09:18 AM
  13. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    There is no built in chemical or binary/chip supported algorithm that uses regression for the battery to learn

    As Omlu points out, heat is a battery's worst enemy and a reason I do not think fast or wireless charging is prudent with a sealed battery for the long term. Both are handy, but not going to optimize long term battery life. If swapping phones out every year though- should be little harm no foul- Except to the person that gets the used phone after the year.
    that does make you wonder... if you get a refurb <i.e. you lose your phone, and your insurance sends you a replacement>, won't it have had a new battery installed anyway?

    And if you do find your battery not keeping a charge the way it used to, they can be replaced by repair shops, can' they?
    09-24-2016 11:15 AM
  14. Strong_Genetics's Avatar
    Training? Ugh no lol ....I'm sure there is some technical reasoning out there that makes sense but it's a phone I'm not raising a Pokemon ....
    09-24-2016 11:17 AM
  15. soulsmilen's Avatar
    I have a Note 3. I have NOT used a different battery. Now granted after 2 years I stopped using, shut it down, went to N5.

    However I used it again recently. ZERO difference in battery from when I last stopped using it. None. I charged it right up and usef it as normal.

    Battery life and what you should do has a lot of myth and misunderstanding.
    And it largely depends on your charging and usage habits.

    (ETA: As in how often it's charged and total battery hours.)

    My Note 4's battery wasn't failing, but it sure wasn't the same usage I was getting in the beginning. Then after I retired it for the (first Note 7 and had to pull it back into use, it started the down to 40% then big drop. Repeatedly. Got a new battery and it's fine now.

    Batteries do deteriorate, that's why there's a rating on the battery for the lifetime hours. That's not a myth.

    Two years is about the norm, depending on usage and charging.
    Of course there will be variables.
    09-24-2016 11:55 AM
  16. soulsmilen's Avatar
    There is no built in chemical or binary/chip supported algorithm that uses regression for the battery to learn

    As Omlu points out, heat is a battery's worst enemy and a reason I do not think fast or wireless charging is prudent with a sealed battery for the long term. Both are handy, but not going to optimize long term battery life. If swapping phones out every year though- should be little harm no foul- Except to the person that gets the used phone after the year.
    Thanks Rushmore, was hoping the battery expert would chime in.

    So the techs that advise not to let it go below 40% are saying that based only on the longevity of and repeated heat produced with a longer charge? That's been my understanding, but if that is wrong please correct me. I know that is not what some techs advise, and you may not agree, but I was just surprised since 40 is relatively conservative. I figured it is based on the heat theory.
    09-24-2016 12:00 PM
  17. rushmore's Avatar
    Thanks Rushmore, was hoping the battery expert would chime in.

    So the techs that advise not to let it go below 40% are saying that based only on the longevity of and repeated heat produced with a longer charge? That's been my understanding, but if that is wrong please correct me. I know that is not what some techs advise, and you may not agree, but I was just surprised since 40 is relatively conservative. I figured it is based on the heat theory.
    I do not understand their convention in doing that. You can charge when you want. I have been doing that since the Droid Incredible (battery life bad). Force of habit for me. If I can charge, I do it. The Note 7 though I am not as compelled. Battery life is the best of any device I have owned.
    soulsmilen likes this.
    09-24-2016 12:17 PM
  18. Aquila's Avatar
    Im wondering if you guys are training your batteries by letting it go down to like 15-20% and then charging to 100% for the first week or so that way your battery can hold charge/last longer or is this a myth? Does this help or its not needed?
    Not only does it not help, it is actually bad for the battery.
    09-24-2016 08:40 PM
  19. shaleem's Avatar
    I gotta tell you all, I've learned so much about so many things from so many of you during this Note 7 debacle than I have in years. Thank you all so much. I was a BlackBerry user for many, many years and moved to Android/Samsung starting with the Galaxy S3. From there it was Note 3, 4 and now 7.
    09-24-2016 08:47 PM
  20. Aquila's Avatar
    Thanks Rushmore, was hoping the battery expert would chime in.

    So the techs that advise not to let it go below 40% are saying that based only on the longevity of and repeated heat produced with a longer charge? That's been my understanding, but if that is wrong please correct me. I know that is not what some techs advise, and you may not agree, but I was just surprised since 40 is relatively conservative. I figured it is based on the heat theory.
    It's entirely just based on shorter, shallow chargers rather than doing deep discharges followed by a long charge. The entire practice is to keep the device between 40% and 80% as much as possible and that if you ever have to choose between going below 20% or charging to 100%, even if it means staying at 100% longer than necessary, that you should go up rather than down. Part of this practice takes into account the behaviors of fast charging technology, which charges faster at lower levels than it does at higher levels. So between 0% and X%, it's at A power, Between X% and Y% it's at B power and between Y% and 100% it's at C power, where A > B > C. So the most ideal situation would be to have as much C time as possible, but since that's unrealistic as it's usually barely using your device at all, they then switch and say try to keep your charging rates to the B area as much as possible by avoiding deep discharges.
    soulsmilen and benjamminh like this.
    09-24-2016 08:52 PM
  21. Ca_lvn's Avatar
    I charge my battery one Dailey at the end of the day on a slow wireless charger.
    In the last month performance has improved.
    Downside it's the explosive old note 7 battery
    09-24-2016 08:56 PM
  22. Phillip Pugh's Avatar
    Nope use it throw it on the charger whenever needed.
    Damn dude I want your profile picture haha I'm jealous tried to change mine but having all kinds of issues
    09-25-2016 04:17 PM
  23. 05GT's Avatar
    Damn dude I want your profile picture haha I'm jealous tried to change mine but having all kinds of issues
    Are you training your new battery?-309efabdffb0abe5954fa5486e9ec97a.jpg
    jimd1050 likes this.
    09-25-2016 08:34 PM
  24. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Thanks Rushmore, was hoping the battery expert would chime in.

    So the techs that advise not to let it go below 40% are saying that based only on the longevity of and repeated heat produced with a longer charge? That's been my understanding, but if that is wrong please correct me. I know that is not what some techs advise, and you may not agree, but I was just surprised since 40 is relatively conservative. I figured it is based on the heat theory.
    From my reading on Battery University, and people that have done fairly extensive testing on Li-ion/Lipo batteries on their own in the RC hobbies, the reason for 40% isn't much about heat. They can handle up to about 150°F, and phones rarely go above 120°F.

    These batteries like being in the middle of their charge levels. If you drain too low or keep them too high, they breakdown quicker due to accelerated chemical reactions. 20% is getting into the red zone, so most people go conservative with phones and advocate charging at 40%. 30% for removable batteries. Conversely, don't leave your phone plugged in at 100% all the time either. That too will also kill a battery off in short order (about 6 months in my personal experience... ).

    Going back to the OP, draining to zero once in a great while won't do a lot of harm as long as you charge it soon. The circuitry does have a calibration function, which is essentially reset when it's drained to 0%. This is sometimes recommended as a last ditch check if you suspect your battery is going bad, but I've yet to see someone do this and actually solve a calibration related issue. The battery in question was just done for.
    soulsmilen likes this.
    09-25-2016 09:53 PM
  25. soulsmilen's Avatar
    From my reading on Battery University, and people that have done fairly extensive testing on Li-ion/Lipo batteries on their own in the RC hobbies, the reason for 40% isn't much about heat. They can handle up to about 150°F, and phones rarely go above 120°F.

    These batteries like being in the middle of their charge levels. If you drain too low or keep them too high, they breakdown quicker due to accelerated chemical reactions. 20% is getting into the red zone, so most people go conservative with phones and advocate charging at 40%. 30% for removable batteries. Conversely, don't leave your phone plugged in at 100% all the time either. That too will also kill a battery off in short order (about 6 months in my personal experience... ).

    Going back to the OP, draining to zero once in a great while won't do a lot of harm as long as you charge it soon. The circuitry does have a calibration function, which is essentially reset when it's drained to 0%. This is sometimes recommended as a last ditch check if you suspect your battery is going bad, but I've yet to see someone do this and actually solve a calibration related issue. The battery in question was just done for.
    I do not understand their convention in doing that. You can charge when you want. I have been doing that since the Droid Incredible (battery life bad). Force of habit for me. If I can charge, I do it. The Note 7 though I am not as compelled. Battery life is the best of any device I have owned.
    It's entirely just based on shorter, shallow chargers rather than doing deep discharges followed by a long charge. The entire practice is to keep the device between 40% and 80% as much as possible and that if you ever have to choose between going below 20% or charging to 100%, even if it means staying at 100% longer than necessary, that you should go up rather than down. Part of this practice takes into account the behaviors of fast charging technology, which charges faster at lower levels than it does at higher levels. So between 0% and X%, it's at A power, Between X% and Y% it's at B power and between Y% and 100% it's at C power, where A > B > C. So the most ideal situation would be to have as much C time as possible, but since that's unrealistic as it's usually barely using your device at all, they then switch and say try to keep your charging rates to the B area as much as possible by avoiding deep discharges.
    Thanks for all the answers good info!
    09-25-2016 10:43 PM
36 12

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