10-08-2016 11:00 PM
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  1. RocketmanJLC's Avatar
    I haven't read all 26 pages of comments. But in the ones I've seen there's been nothing directly suggesting that the first incident of a replacement phone catching fire - on a plane, a worst-case scenario of the type Samsung's competitors/detractors would stand to benefit by most - seems to be a bit too convenient to be automatically presumed to be a naturally-occurring, random event. Especially before the device and the circumstances of the incident have been thoroughly investigated by Samsung/CPSC. Did I miss something? Either way, the damage to Samsung and the Note 7 is probably already undo-ably done.
    amyf27 and erasat like this.
    10-08-2016 10:19 AM
  2. kevinpleasants's Avatar
    Basically doesn't say anything other than they're investigating. They are waiting until they have factual evidence before making any hardcore decisions
    Yep that's what it says.
    10-08-2016 10:26 AM
  3. celsior360's Avatar
    The only place in Asia that recalled devices was South Korea, so this would not be a case of a deemed "safe" device. China stated unhappiness to Samsung about no recall effort there.
    They recall the first 500 and 1858 units in Hong Kong and China respectively, and that's all. This is why the Chinese government thinks why Samsung is doing a double standard recall apart from them.
    10-08-2016 10:38 AM
  4. erasat's Avatar
    I haven't read all 26 pages of comments. But in the ones I've seen there's been nothing directly suggesting that the first incident of a replacement phone catching fire - on a plane, a worst-case scenario of the type Samsung's competitors/detractors would stand to benefit by most - seems to be a bit too convenient to be automatically presumed to be a naturally-occurring, random event. Especially before the device and the circumstances of the incident have been thoroughly investigated by Samsung/CPSC. Did I miss something? Either way, the damage to Samsung and the Note 7 is probably already undo-ably done.
    Exactly and I'm afraid that it will take just a couple of clever anti Samsung guys (in this forum alone you will have a couple of them) that will go the extra mile to put the nail in the coffin and just get ideas of the recent published videos of how a battery can gets fire and the rest of common knowledge about how to do it and simply take one for the team.

    No matter if at the end of an investigation it is determined that it was caused by an accidental damage to the phone, pinching the battery by brutal force or any other cause, the damage to the phone and Samsung will already be done, just like the Grandma case and some of the other cases that were proven already to be caused by other means and not a phone's fault, what matters is public perception, right?
    10-08-2016 10:38 AM
  5. Chance's Avatar
    At least this statement sounds better than the first one did.
    10-08-2016 11:06 AM
  6. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Basically, it's "We know you folks are concerned with the safety of the replacement Note 7s. We're trying to get to the bottom of this and will update when we can".

    Not exactly the answer some were expecting, but it is at least better than the first one, which I found pretty dumb.
    10-08-2016 11:09 AM
  7. da3lynx's Avatar
    Not much else they can say until the investigation is complete. I really hope it's exposed as BS. Tired of all the focus on the note 7.
    10-08-2016 11:29 AM
  8. chuco35's Avatar
    That says nothing.

    All Samsung needs to know is the carrier and the phone number of the customer, to discern whether the phone was a replacement or not. The customer says it was. Why would she lie?

    Samsung already knows the answer. That they are still holding back is disconcerting. I'm taking a flight this afternoon.
    10-08-2016 11:41 AM
  9. al3azim's Avatar
    That says nothing.

    All Samsung needs to know is the carrier and the phone number of the customer, to discern whether the phone was a replacement or not. The customer says it was. Why would she lie?

    Samsung already knows the answer. That they are still holding back is disconcerting. I'm taking a flight this afternoon.
    It's not that the customer is lying it's whether this is going to be a problem with all the new replacement (as in a defect in the build) or an isolated situation that was caused by something the owner might have done unknowingly that triggered this issue. There are reports of different phones exploding regularly and those are rare and this could be one of those cases with the new replaced units. If a recall was not previously, this would not even be a situation at all and nobody would have mentioned it. But it is getting way more attention because of the previous recall. Samsung wants to confirm that it did address the issue with their previous recall as it will not sit well with anyone if they did the same mistake twice.
    10-08-2016 12:35 PM
  10. jhimmel's Avatar
    That says nothing.

    All Samsung needs to know is the carrier and the phone number of the customer, to discern whether the phone was a replacement or not. The customer says it was. Why would she lie?

    Samsung already knows the answer. That they are still holding back is disconcerting. I'm taking a flight this afternoon.
    It says they are working to determine the CAUSE, not if it was a replacement.
    10-08-2016 12:37 PM
  11. Bbarbie's Avatar
    Exactly and I'm afraid that it will take just a couple of clever anti Samsung guys (in this forum alone you will have a couple of them) that will go the extra mile to put the nail in the coffin and just get ideas of the recent published videos of how a battery can gets fire and the rest of common knowledge about how to do it and simply take one for the team.

    No matter if at the end of an investigation it is determined that it was caused by an accidental damage to the phone, pinching the battery by brutal force or any other cause, the damage to the phone and Samsung will already be done, just like the Grandma case and some of the other cases that were proven already to be caused by other means and not a phone's fault, what matters is public perception, right?
    This phone sadly is dunzo....

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/9to5goo...android-att-us
    10-08-2016 12:53 PM
  12. Breuklen's Avatar
    Looking at the FAA site, it appears that e-cigs/vaporizers are the cause for most incidents on-board planes this year. There were about 21 incidents on passenger planes (not counting a couple cargo plane incidents) and e-cigs/vaporizers were thought to be responsible for seven incidents. Battery packs/chargers were responsible for four. Two incidents involved a tablet or PED. Two incidents involved laptops (one fire, one incident one with no fire, just the smell of burning plastic). And smartphone fires occurred in at least two incidents as a result of passengers damaging phones by the seat mechanism. So it's a pretty small number of incidents of spontaneous phone fires. If we were to have followup, I'm sure most of the phones were used for some time and probably suffered some unknown damage prior to the fire. That's why a relatively new phone just bursting into flames is a big deal.

    Minimizing that fact, spouting crazy conspiracy theories, and ranting about iPhones is not a good look and will turn off less informed potential buyers. If I had a phone that was recalled, then had a fire in the replacement in less than two weeks you're damn right I would be taking home a non-Samsung phone the same damn way. It appears he was coming home from a business trip with a colleague so he made the decision of buying a new phone right away. It wouldn't surprise me if he was thinking of the iPhone for the first Note 7 and the fire just cemented his decision.

    FAA report on incidents: http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...dent_chart.pdf
    10-08-2016 01:01 PM
  13. jlczl's Avatar
    My note 7 was probably the best device I have ever used rivaled only by the note 4. That being said with this happening to a recalled device perception is can seem like reality in a lot of peoples minds including people who control when you can use the phone such as airlines and other transportation companies such as cruise lines. Sadly I had to move on and I exchanged my T-Mobile note 7 for an iPhone 7 just because it won't get the same negative attention when I travel. I still have my S7 active to get my android fix.
    amyf27 likes this.
    10-08-2016 01:14 PM
  14. oldskoolstyle70's Avatar
    Ok. We are all a little concerned about the phone, in one manner or another. Samsung isn't holding anyone hostage with this phone. All the carrier's are willing to take them back for something else. Instead of complaining about what isn't be done by Samsung, how about we as consumers use the power of choice and either return it or stay with it and just deal with what is coming down the road. Regardless of what bells and whistles are in a device, no inanimate object should cause this much stress in your life.

    For me, I'm riding the wave out. At this point, it is what it is. I won't complain, lose sleep, or blame Apple for anything. It's not worth the energy to pine over something that isn't going to change what's happening.
    jgraves1107 and celsior360 like this.
    10-08-2016 01:30 PM
  15. PraetorianGuard14's Avatar
    Basically, it's "We know you folks are concerned with the safety of the replacement Note 7s. We're trying to get to the bottom of this and will update when we can".

    Not exactly the answer some were expecting, but it is at least better than the first one, which I found pretty dumb.
    What else do you expect them to say?
    10-08-2016 01:34 PM
  16. rushmore's Avatar
    Looking at the FAA site, it appears that e-cigs/vaporizers are the cause for most incidents on-board planes this year. There were about 21 incidents on passenger planes (not counting a couple cargo plane incidents) and e-cigs/vaporizers were thought to be responsible for seven incidents. Battery packs/chargers were responsible for four. Two incidents involved a tablet or PED. Two incidents involved laptops (one fire, one incident one with no fire, just the smell of burning plastic). And smartphone fires occurred in at least two incidents as a result of passengers damaging phones by the seat mechanism. So it's a pretty small number of incidents of spontaneous phone fires. If we were to have followup, I'm sure most of the phones were used for some time and probably suffered some unknown damage prior to the fire. That's why a relatively new phone just bursting into flames is a big deal.

    Minimizing that fact, spouting crazy conspiracy theories, and ranting about iPhones is not a good look and will turn off less informed potential buyers. If I had a phone that was recalled, then had a fire in the replacement in less than two weeks you're damn right I would be taking home a non-Samsung phone the same damn way. It appears he was coming home from a business trip with a colleague so he made the decision of buying a new phone right away. It wouldn't surprise me if he was thinking of the iPhone for the first Note 7 and the fire just cemented his decision.

    FAA report on incidents: http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...dent_chart.pdf

    As the data points out: Where is the same level of incredulity/concern for the other things that have caused more smoke and burning incidents on planes? One event among other media touted events that have so far been discredited. Not getting the focus besides Samsung is a big company with big dollars. A company that appears to have caved to the hysteria themselves. Pretty much sealing their perceptional fate by a lot of the public.

    Yep, Samsung has battery QC issues, but the fervor was based on bogus media pushed events- until apparently maybe this one.
    10-08-2016 01:48 PM
  17. Breuklen's Avatar
    As the data points out: Where is the same level of incredulity/concern for the other things that have caused more smoke and burning incidents on planes? One event among other media touted events that have so far been discredited. Not getting the focus besides Samsung is a big company with big dollars. A company that appears to have caved to the hysteria themselves. Pretty much sealing their perceptional fate by a lot of the public.

    Yep, Samsung has battery QC issues, but the fervor was based on bogus media pushed events- until apparently maybe this one.
    It's not hysteria. My point was about incidents on planes, which are not that often for phones. The Note 7 had dozens of incidents in the US alone. In a relatively short period of time. Samsung's own testing showed a shoddy battery from one of its suppliers, so it was legitimate. They couldn't sit back and hope it would die it, as their business would die out instead. Given the recall, they probably should officially end the Note 7 because any more incidents may harm other lines as the Samsung name is getting a bad rep. Hell, the average consumer just says Samsung phone or even Samsung Galaxy because that's what many people think all Samsung/Android phones are called.
    10-08-2016 02:09 PM
  18. edubb256's Avatar
    That says nothing.

    All Samsung needs to know is the carrier and the phone number of the customer, to discern whether the phone was a replacement or not. The customer says it was. Why would she lie?

    Samsung already knows the answer. That they are still holding back is disconcerting. I'm taking a flight this afternoon.
    Even if you assume he was not lying (and that is not clear), the real question most people are concerned about is whether the replacements are safe and what caused this incident. That particular phone may have been damaged or tampered with in a way that caused the incident.
    10-08-2016 02:21 PM
  19. mickeyboat's Avatar
    This whole thing could turn out to be something to totally different than we think. Owners replacement phone was mixed up at his provider's locations with the recalled new phones. Someone at Samsung grabbed a battery from the bad battery batch going into a new phone. Phone got miss marked as to which mfg's battery it contained. Owner accidently damaged the phone which caused the fire. Owner intentionally damaged the phone to get a new phone. Owner used a charger on the phone which damaged the battery. Precautions we can take for now is to only use the Samsung factory provided Note 7 charger. I would expect by now Samsung has done extensive testing on both mfg's batteries and knows exactly what causes a battery to fail. Lets hope the phone made it back to Samsung so their labs can investigate the cause of the fire. My fear is with all the government agencies involved by now, it will be weeks if not months before Samsung sees the phone and it may be totally destroyed by then by other investigators.
    jamesrick80 likes this.
    10-08-2016 02:45 PM
  20. jamesrick80's Avatar
    This whole thing could turn out to be something to totally different than we think. Owners replacement phone was mixed up at his provider's locations with the recalled new phones. Someone at Samsung grabbed a battery from the bad battery batch going into a new phone. Phone got miss marked as to which mfg's battery it contained. Owner accidently damaged the phone which caused the fire. Owner intentionally damaged the phone to get a new phone. Owner used a charger on the phone which damaged the battery. Precautions we can take for now is to only use the Samsung factory provided Note 7 charger. I would expect by now Samsung has done extensive testing on both mfg's batteries and knows exactly what causes a battery to fail. Lets hope the phone made it back to Samsung so their labs can investigate the cause of the fire. My fear is with all the government agencies involved by now, it will be weeks if not months before Samsung sees the phone and it may be totally destroyed by then by other investigators.
    Agree....and should we let one incident in the U.S. dictate a recall....
    10-08-2016 03:24 PM
  21. jfenton's Avatar
    I don't get the "owner might have used a non OEM charger" comments? Seriously?
    I can't believe that everyone has OEM Samsung chargers in their cars, that everyone should have to use a Samsung OEM cable or charger, etc.
    10-08-2016 03:31 PM
  22. freedomx20a's Avatar
    I don't get the "owner might have used a non OEM charger" comments? Seriously?
    I can't believe that everyone has OEM Samsung chargers in their cars, that everyone should have to use a Samsung OEM cable or charger, etc.
    It helps. It's like they design it to fall in non oem


    Got my mom a USB cable for her iPhone to plug in to her oem charger from a convenient store for five bucks.

    The iPhone got soo hot and the cable was so hot.

    The cable looked nice and red like beats with the flat tangle free design.


    Never used that cable agian
    10-08-2016 03:55 PM
  23. Breuklen's Avatar
    I don't get the "owner might have used a non OEM charger" comments? Seriously?
    I can't believe that everyone has OEM Samsung chargers in their cars, that everyone should have to use a Samsung OEM cable or charger, etc.
    It's besides the point actually: "He said the phone was at around 80 percent of battery capacity when the incident occurred and that he only used a wireless charger since receiving the device."
    10-08-2016 04:01 PM
  24. jgraves1107's Avatar
    I use a non oem charger and cables. No problems with heat on mine.
    10-08-2016 04:04 PM
  25. Breuklen's Avatar
    It helps. It's like they design it to fall in non oem
    No, it's just a cheap POS that is poorly designed. What would be the purpose of intentionally designing it to fail? You actually think they want to people to get hurt and/or die? It's just part of chasing $$.

    Never understood buyers risking a $5-10 cord/charger for a $600+ smartphone.
    10-08-2016 04:05 PM
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