10-22-2016 06:47 PM
82 1234
tools
  1. James Beam's Avatar
    I agree with you Natehoy. I just found it odd how Verizon handled my situation. I randomly discovered that my initial monthly payments I had made on the Note had been refunded and my contract had been voided when I went to pay my bill. Also the Note 7 was listed as “Paid in full” I never got an official notification by email or text as to why this was done. This was a day before the official recall was announced. Now obviously, I don’t live under a rock and pretty much knew it was due to impending recall. But the only real notification from them after that, was a text and email saying they “strongly encourage” me to power down the note and participate in the exchange program by upgrading to a new device. I didn’t want to do that though. Verizon currently doesn’t have anything in their lineup that I want, or anything coming down the pipe any time soon that I want either. So my choice was to simply reactivate an old phone, which I did online myself with no human interaction. By doing it this way, I never received any sort of instruction whatsoever as to what I should do with the Note now that I’m no longer using it. So it’s currently still in my possession. There is no indication that I even owned a Note 7 on my account anymore. It’s like it never happened. Now I’m smart enough to know that I could just call Verizon and likely request the return box and send it on its way back to Samsung. But what about the people who have activated old phones and don’t really have a clue? Do you think Verizon is still on the liability hook since they gave no indication on how to send it back when not doing an upgrade/exchange? They don’t even list how to do this on their Note 7 recall FAQ on the Verizon website. I think they forgot to cover all their bases in this case. If something were to happen and the phone goes up in flames on someone who just reactivated an old phone the way I did, I think Verizon is still going to be holding the bag… I’ve taken precautions to prevent anything serious from happening while it’s in my possession (I ran the battery dead and have it stored in a small fire safe). Personally, I’d like to hang onto if they don’t ever actually come "looking" for it on their own. I like to collect stuff and want to keep it just for the novelty of it all. I’m assuming all of the risk by keeping it and I’m not placing anyone in danger but myself. I don’t ever intend to power it back up and continue using it for any purpose other than a collection piece, so I think the risk is very minimal at this point.
    10-18-2016 11:06 AM
  2. jgraves1107's Avatar
    Actually in a recall all liability falls to Samsung no matter what. Spoke with an attorney and he says the only way they get out of it is if they get the phone back. If you fail to return it after a period of time it falls to you then. The only way you could get your carrier to let you continue to use it on their network is by waiver. If you acknowledge and accept responsibility in writing they can let you use it. As he said they more than likely would not. He went on with a list of things that could happen, with, if carriers left them as is and no more fires happened it could also prove 6 months down the road the recall was unnecessary.
    kevinpleasants and athenatp like this.
    10-18-2016 11:15 AM
  3. jamesrick80's Avatar
    Actually in a recall all liability falls to Samsung no matter what. Spoke with an attorney and he says the only way they get out of it is if they get the phone back. If you fail to return it after a period of time it falls to you then. The only way you could get your carrier to let you continue to use it on their network is by waiver. If you acknowledge and accept responsibility in writing they can let you use it. As he said they more than likely would not. He went on with a list of things that could happen, with, if carriers left them as is and no more fires happened it could also prove 6 months down the road the recall was unnecessary.
    No reason to take yourself through an ordeal like this....why pack on the stress...get rid of the device...it's just a gadget and new gadgets are released every year...no matter how much u love it or hate it
    10-18-2016 11:24 AM
  4. ab304945's Avatar
    You will never get any updates. No security or os.
    10-18-2016 11:30 AM
  5. jgraves1107's Avatar
    Truthfully I don't even care if it gets updated. It is fine like it is. I will use it for what I need it to do. Video, pics, mp3 player, social media, notes, playing with the iris scanner. I have a new s7e and it just feels like a phone to the N7. It's a glorified paper weight with some useful tools.
    kevinpleasants and TomOfTx like this.
    10-18-2016 11:38 AM
  6. jfoofoo's Avatar
    Kill switch??? Is that ethical? I mean it's a recall. I can choose not to pursue it, right?
    If you consider keeping a device that may cause fire and burn down your house, your neighbor's house ethical...
    I see nothing wrong with Samsung just kill the phone...
    jamesrick80 likes this.
    10-18-2016 01:34 PM
  7. jgraves1107's Avatar
    If you consider keeping a device that may cause fire and burn down your house, your neighbor's house ethical...
    I see nothing wrong with Samsung just kill the phone...
    The problem right now with that is they can't make any catch fire from normal use. If Samsung and the cpsc fail to make them burn even using vr then everyone has freaked for nothing. No my neighbor is not even close enough for that to happen. My phone is either on me or on glass that will withstand the fire and keep it contained. This isn't everyone's first rodeo. I have an extensive background in containment of such situations. Yes if I was not so into lithium batteries all over my desk and house with vaping gear I might fear the N7 a bit. I got bigger batteries than 3500mah. For the average user yes turn it in and be done I agree.
    TomOfTx and kevinpleasants like this.
    10-18-2016 02:05 PM
  8. rkierstead8's Avatar
    I agree with you Natehoy. I just found it odd how Verizon handled my situation. I randomly discovered that my initial monthly payments I had made on the Note had been refunded and my contract had been voided when I went to pay my bill. Also the Note 7 was listed as “Paid in full” I never got an official notification by email or text as to why this was done. This was a day before the official recall was announced. Now obviously, I don’t live under a rock and pretty much knew it was due to impending recall. But the only real notification from them after that, was a text and email saying they “strongly encourage” me to power down the note and participate in the exchange program by upgrading to a new device. I didn’t want to do that though. Verizon currently doesn’t have anything in their lineup that I want, or anything coming down the pipe any time soon that I want either. So my choice was to simply reactivate an old phone, which I did online myself with no human interaction. By doing it this way, I never received any sort of instruction whatsoever as to what I should do with the Note now that I’m no longer using it. So it’s currently still in my possession. There is no indication that I even owned a Note 7 on my account anymore. It’s like it never happened. Now I’m smart enough to know that I could just call Verizon and likely request the return box and send it on its way back to Samsung. But what about the people who have activated old phones and don’t really have a clue? Do you think Verizon is still on the liability hook since they gave no indication on how to send it back when not doing an upgrade/exchange? They don’t even list how to do this on their Note 7 recall FAQ on the Verizon website. I think they forgot to cover all their bases in this case. If something were to happen and the phone goes up in flames on someone who just reactivated an old phone the way I did, I think Verizon is still going to be holding the bag… I’ve taken precautions to prevent anything serious from happening while it’s in my possession (I ran the battery dead and have it stored in a small fire safe). Personally, I’d like to hang onto if they don’t ever actually come "looking" for it on their own. I like to collect stuff and want to keep it just for the novelty of it all. I’m assuming all of the risk by keeping it and I’m not placing anyone in danger but myself. I don’t ever intend to power it back up and continue using it for any purpose other than a collection piece, so I think the risk is very minimal at this point.
    The same has happened to my account, but I plan to keep it and continue to use it. It is called a voluntary recall for a reason.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-18-2016 02:06 PM
  9. jhimmel's Avatar
    The problem right now with that is they can't make any catch fire from normal use. If Samsung and the cpsc fail to make them burn even using vr then everyone has freaked for nothing. No my neighbor is not even close enough for that to happen. My phone is either on me or on glass that will withstand the fire and keep it contained. This isn't everyone's first rodeo. I have an extensive background in containment of such situations. Yes if I was not so into lithium batteries all over my desk and house with vaping gear I might fear the N7 a bit. I got bigger batteries than 3500mah. For the average user yes turn it in and be done I agree.
    People keep talking about houses burning down. One post even asked "How many more houses have to burn down before people get it". Have any houses burned down? I know there was a jeep fire that got called into question about the actual cause. I'm pretty sure a nasty smoke is emitted when it burns up. I assume under the right circumstances it could burn something down. I guess a house burns down somewhere in the world like every 2 minutes from cigarette use (careless use).
    10-18-2016 02:18 PM
  10. LeoRex's Avatar
    If Samsung and the cpsc fail to make them burn even using vr then everyone has freaked for nothing.
    Actually, the fact that they may not have isolated a root cause and steps to reproduce the conditions that caused the failures makes this more troubling, not less. If they can reliably force the failure, they can issue more directed warnings for those who are refusing to follow the recommendations of numerous government agencies world-wide and Samsung to shut down the device and return it.

    This is coming from someone who has been working in QA and QC for 20 some odd years... the critical faults that we can't reproduce, THOSE are the ones we freak out over.
    ajb1965 and TomOfTx like this.
    10-18-2016 02:46 PM
  11. dejanh's Avatar
    Actually, the fact that they may not have isolated a root cause and steps to reproduce the conditions that caused the failures makes this more troubling, not less. If they can reliably force the failure, they can issue more directed warnings for those who are refusing to follow the recommendations of numerous government agencies world-wide and Samsung to shut down the device and return it.

    This is coming from someone who has been working in QA and QC for 20 some odd years... the critical faults that we can't reproduce, THOSE are the ones we freak out over.
    Perfectly justified too because a problem that you can reproduce you can mitigate and fix. Not so if you can't reproduce it. Nevertheless, I still think that this is a specific set of circumstances that have to come together to cause an issue and not a systemic failure in the design. If it was the latter the problem should be easier to reproduce. Problems that are hard to reproduce are those that involve unpredictable external factors and usage patterns that may have been overlooked in the design.
    Joeykool and TomOfTx like this.
    10-18-2016 05:09 PM
  12. LeoRex's Avatar
    Nevertheless, I still think that this is a specific set of circumstances that have to come together to cause an issue and not a systemic failure in the design.
    Then where are the hundreds of burned up iPhone 7s? Or S7 edges? The Note isn't some magical unicorn being used differently than anything else on the market. It's a phone, like all the other phones.. used by schlubs like you and me... The phone is at fault, not the user or how is used.

    Even then... I've used this expression a bunch when we talk about negative path testing... If I can press a button and the building could explode by accident, don't tell people to not press the button, just get rid of the button. It's safe to say that these phones weren't all abused... Unless we're like those morons who go at their phones with hammers on YouTube, they should never breath fire.
    10-18-2016 05:46 PM
  13. avalvo's Avatar
    Still running on my original 7 from Samsung.com. It it works great. The debacle caused Paypal to refund me for the phone and all accessories. So, I own it for free. I will ride it out as long as possible. I highly doubt the carrier will turn it off and not likely Samsung will either, if they want to keep a customer base. I dont really fly, so I'll just keep enjoying my free , and excellent, phone.
    TomOfTx and kevinpleasants like this.
    10-18-2016 06:04 PM
  14. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    Actually, the fact that they may not have isolated a root cause and steps to reproduce the conditions that caused the failures makes this more troubling, not less. If they can reliably force the failure, they can issue more directed warnings for those who are refusing to follow the recommendations of numerous government agencies world-wide and Samsung to shut down the device and return it.

    This is coming from someone who has been working in QA and QC for 20 some odd years... the critical faults that we can't reproduce, THOSE are the ones we freak out over.
    I see your point, but I think the other person's point is, if they can't re-create it in the lab where they're looking for it, the odds of accidentally doing it on your own are slim
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-18-2016 06:09 PM
  15. jgraves1107's Avatar
    Then where are the hundreds of burned up iPhone 7s? Or S7 edges? The Note isn't some magical unicorn being used differently than anything else on the market. It's a phone, like all the other phones.. used by schlubs like you and me... The phone is at fault, not the user or how is used.

    Even then... I've used this expression a bunch when we talk about negative path testing... If I can press a button and the building could explode by accident, don't tell people to not press the button, just get rid of the button. It's safe to say that these phones weren't all abused... Unless we're like those morons who go at their phones with hammers on YouTube, they should never breath fire.
    I gave my 20yo daughter a practically new N4 and less than 2 months it went from new to omg what a piece of junk. So yes there are users that really shouldn't touch electronics.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-18-2016 06:12 PM
  16. Ewing33855's Avatar
    Aside from not being able to fly with it... What are the other downsides?
    Eventually all carriers will eliminate the note 7 from their network so anyone who doesn't want to return it exchange their note 7 will have the phone deactivated by force. That's my belief. It's too risky for carriers and Samsung to have these still active in the marketplace.
    10-18-2016 07:21 PM
  17. LeoRex's Avatar
    I see your point, but I think the other person's point is, if they can't re-create it in the lab where they're looking for it, the odds of accidentally doing it on your own are slim
    They also didn't find the fault during the r&d phase either.. doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist.
    10-18-2016 08:53 PM
  18. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    They also didn't find the fault during the r&d phase either.. doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist.
    I didn't say it didn't exist. Just that the odds are slim.
    10-18-2016 08:56 PM
  19. The Phone Company's Avatar
    You will never get any updates. No security or os.
    Strange, we got an update yesterday.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-18-2016 09:59 PM
  20. steelers1's Avatar
    Strange, we got an update yesterday.
    What update and carrier?
    10-18-2016 10:26 PM
  21. The Phone Company's Avatar
    Update: N9300ZHU2BPJ4
    Size: 112.37 MB
    Here are the list of improvements to functions as outlined in the notification.

    • Provides guidance pop-up when the charger is not connected properly.
    • Other bug fixes
    • Fix occasional issue that touch screen to malfunction
    • Latest Android security patches
    • Device security has been further enhanced.
    Received an update on SM-N9300 | Samsung Galaxy Note 7
    dejanh likes this.
    10-18-2016 10:58 PM
  22. Joeykool's Avatar
    I want to keep using this phone so bad but I'm worried about it's future. I never had a note and I love it but....

    I'm gonna get and lg v20 and Call it over sadly
    10-18-2016 11:06 PM
  23. sean_4d8's Avatar
    Why keep it? Why is anyone questioning this? Don't be stubborn. Dump it
    A voice of REASON! 👍🏾
    10-19-2016 04:09 AM
  24. dejanh's Avatar
    Then where are the hundreds of burned up iPhone 7s? Or S7 edges? The Note isn't some magical unicorn being used differently than anything else on the market. It's a phone, like all the other phones.. used by schlubs like you and me... The phone is at fault, not the user or how is used.

    Even then... I've used this expression a bunch when we talk about negative path testing... If I can press a button and the building could explode by accident, don't tell people to not press the button, just get rid of the button. It's safe to say that these phones weren't all abused... Unless we're like those morons who go at their phones with hammers on YouTube, they should never breath fire.
    To be entirely fair to Samsung, the phone does pack in a specific array of technology that isn't present in any other phone, starting with Samsung proprietary implementation of USB-C quick charging coupled with fast wireless charging. This is completely unique to the Note. Changing any one parameter can make a difference. Changing one as important as power circuitry makes a critical difference. A missed use case or a specific sequence of events can therefore lead to failure on the Note 7 that simply would not be possible with any other phone. I don't disagree with your emphasis on needing to deal with the problem, but I stand by my statement that I do not believe this to be a systemic problem.
    10-19-2016 08:49 AM
  25. Almeuit's Avatar
    To be entirely fair to Samsung, the phone does pack in a specific array of technology that isn't present in any other phone, starting with Samsung proprietary implementation of USB-C quick charging coupled with fast wireless charging. This is completely unique to the Note. Changing any one parameter can make a difference. Changing one as important as power circuitry makes a critical difference. A missed use case or a specific sequence of events can therefore lead to failure on the Note 7 that simply would not be possible with any other phone. I don't disagree with your emphasis on needing to deal with the problem, but I stand by my statement that I do not believe this to be a systemic problem.
    So from the sound of what you said -- Samsung messed up on their proprietary implementation of USB-C since other phones have USB-C and do not have this issue.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    10-19-2016 08:59 AM
82 1234

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-15-2016, 10:16 PM
  2. If the Note 7 could pick an encore song . . .
    By SteelGator in forum Samsung Galaxy Note 7
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-17-2016, 01:49 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-17-2016, 05:07 AM
  4. What are lollipop trusted certificates
    By AC Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2016, 09:34 PM
  5. Green box keeps moving around screen how do i get rid of it
    By AC Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-16-2016, 08:00 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD