10-21-2016 06:56 PM
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  1. ateamlawn's Avatar
    https://www.cnet.com/news/over-1-mil...ill-on-recall/

    http://www.androidheadlines.com/2016...till-used.html

    Funny there's over a million still in use and no incidents reported recently.....? 🤔
    Wow that's amazing. Kinda proves my point. People are trying to give all these reasons why we should turn it in but Samsung said it was a voluntary recall. Besides it's hard to give up the best smartphone ever made by far. A recall is a recall so they can't refuse to refund me when the new one comes out unless they make it a mandatory recall and give a cut off date. But risking losing my money is a risk I am willing to take. At this time I don't believe I'm taking any other risks.
    10-19-2016 01:32 PM
  2. jgraves1107's Avatar
    Verizon said they won't cut my N7 off. I will just have to pay for it all at once if I keep it. I was told they are having trouble getting people to give them up which includes their own employees that bought them out right. It's starting to look like the people that had issues that are real only wanted out of the N7 so they could get an iPhone 7. So they may have deliberately destroyed the phone to start this process.
    10-19-2016 06:47 PM
  3. chyeo1979's Avatar
    If this was even remotely possible -- why would Samsung openly ADMIT fault? They admitted they messed up the batteries and knew they did. How would that have anything to do with Google?

    1+1 doesn't equal 4.
    I believe Note 7's battery do have design problem and some phones genuinely caught fire, but the issue might had been blown up much bigger than it really was such that it did not give Samsung chance to investigate and confirm the cause, affected batch etc.

    It was mentioned there are 90+ reported cases. How many phones out of these reported cases are returned for investigation. I can similarly puncture my phone battery, let it catch fire and just post some pics online. It will be reported by all the media within hours and none of them will bother to find out if it's real.
    Weils and TomOfTx like this.
    10-19-2016 06:54 PM
  4. Mdm23's Avatar
    I believe Note 7's battery do have design problem and some phones genuinely caught fire, but the issue might had been blown up much bigger than it really was such that it did not give Samsung chance to investigate and confirm the cause, affected batch etc.

    It was mentioned there are 90+ reported cases. How many phones out of these reported cases are returned for investigation. I can similarly puncture my phone battery, let it catch fire and just post some pics online. It will be reported by all the media within hours and none of them will bother to find out if it's real.
    Out of those 90 cases, I think I read around 30 were already proven fraudulent. Example: 6 year old boy whose grandparents claimed was burned. Turned out the phone they were using wasn't a Note 7 at all. So it's easy to see that even more of the reports are probably fake. Can't believe Samsung was forced to this position, with virtually no proof of what actually was happening in many of these cases. I'm glad I got my first and my replacement quickly, because I'm still using a Note 7 right now. I'm thinking more and more there's something fishy behind all this.
    10-19-2016 07:08 PM
  5. chyeo1979's Avatar
    Out of those 90 cases, I think I read around 30 were already proven fraudulent. Example: 6 year old boy whose grandparents claimed was burned. Turned out the phone they were using wasn't a Note 7 at all. So it's easy to see that even more of the reports are probably fake. Can't believe Samsung was forced to this position, with virtually no proof of what actually was happening in many of these cases. I'm glad I got my first and my replacement quickly, because I'm still using a Note 7 right now. I'm thinking more and more there's something fishy behind all this.
    The worrying thing is this (false reports) can simply continue to their new phone with Samsung unable to do anything about it.
    TomOfTx and VysheKryshi like this.
    10-19-2016 10:15 PM
  6. kevinpleasants's Avatar
    Returned mine. I don't think there is a conspiracy. Samsung wouldn't just cancel a product without evidence of truth behind it. Losing billions isn't their goal.
    They made a good business decision to throw in the towel once they notice there was false claims and so called victims wouldnt give Samsung their supposedly burnt phones to be examined, It actually cost them less to cancel the Note 7. But the Note will be back.
    10-19-2016 11:23 PM
  7. calicocat2010's Avatar
    https://www.cnet.com/news/over-1-mil...ill-on-recall/

    http://www.androidheadlines.com/2016...till-used.html

    Funny there's over a million still in use and no incidents reported recently.....? 🤔
    Maybe it is Google because they pushed out their first Google phone and it's getting rave reviews.....
    Mayze likes this.
    10-20-2016 01:52 AM
  8. 103Softail's Avatar
    Were Samsung actually on the grassy knoll? Unfortunately when BIG $$$ are involved anything is possible and I believe Samsung were shafted. By whom? Somebody standing to gain BIG $$$. It happens in politics (here in Australia for example) and it happens in big business. So which companies are making gains at the expense of a fantastic Note 7? We all know the answer to that.
    10-20-2016 03:42 AM
  9. The Phone Company's Avatar
    I believe Note 7's battery do have design problem and some phones genuinely caught fire, but the issue might had been blown up much bigger than it really was such that it did not give Samsung chance to investigate and confirm the cause, affected batch etc.

    It was mentioned there are 90+ reported cases. How many phones out of these reported cases are returned for investigation. I can similarly puncture my phone battery, let it catch fire and just post some pics online. It will be reported by all the media within hours and none of them will bother to find out if it's real.
    Considering there are those out there, excuse the pun, with enough money to burn, they post YouTube videos of 'Drop Tests' and 'Scratch Tests' on all these newly released devices, intentionally to see them destroyed.
    10-20-2016 07:19 AM
  10. The Phone Company's Avatar
    And on this Note I have decided to keep my Note 4, will NOT, EVER, be duped into getting a stupid Pixie, V20, or even the one I was considering, the S7 Edge.
    Had I been lucky enough to have received my pre-ordered Note 7 this is the Phone I would be using today. I envy those who have theirs.
    10-20-2016 07:23 AM
  11. ateamlawn's Avatar
    And on this Note I have decided to keep my Note 4, will NOT, EVER, be duped into getting a stupid Pixie, V20, or even the one I was considering, the S7 Edge.
    Had I been lucky enough to have received my pre-ordered Note 7 this is the Phone I would be using today. I envy those who have theirs.
    I'm sure there are people out there who will sell you one. It will eventually become a collector's item. Some of the people on this thread have said they still have theirs but are waiting on their replacement phone. Hit them up.
    The Phone Company likes this.
    10-20-2016 09:27 AM
  12. The Phone Company's Avatar
    I'm sure there are people out there who will sell you one. It will eventually become a collector's item. Some of the people on this thread have said they still have theirs but are waiting on their replacement phone. Hit them up.
    Seriously, I will buy one, unopened boxed preferably. Defo!
    ateamlawn likes this.
    10-20-2016 09:40 AM
  13. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I'm sure there are people out there who will sell you one. It will eventually become a collector's item. Some of the people on this thread have said they still have theirs but are waiting on their replacement phone. Hit them up.
    Seriously, I will buy one, unopened boxed preferably. Defo!
    This is not a good idea. Samsung does not want anyone keeping these phones, nor does the FAA.

    If you choose to keep it or acquire one and it causes damage or injury, then you could be held responsible for the damages.
    10-20-2016 09:54 AM
  14. ateamlawn's Avatar
    This is not a good idea. Samsung does not want anyone keeping these phones, nor does the FAA.

    If you choose to keep it or acquire one and it causes damage or injury, then you could be held responsible for the damages.
    Yes we know that and we are willing to take that risk.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-20-2016 10:55 AM
  15. ateamlawn's Avatar
    This is not a good idea. Samsung does not want anyone keeping these phones, nor does the FAA.

    If you choose to keep it or acquire one and it causes damage or injury, then you could be held responsible for the damages.
    If Samsung didn't want us to keep the phones they would have made it a mandatory recall and bricked all the phones.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    10-20-2016 10:58 AM
  16. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    If Samsung didn't want us to keep the phones they would have made it a mandatory recall and bricked all the phones.
    From the Consumer Product Safety Commission:
    .
    VII. Monitoring
    Recalled Products
    Every recall conducted in coordination with the staff is monitored by both the
    recalling firm
    and the
    Commission.
    Recalling firms need to understand and prepare for the monitoring since the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act
    (CPSIA) makes it unlawful for any person to sell, offer for sale, manufacture for
    sale, distribute in commerce, or import into the United States any consumer
    product or substance that is subject to a voluntary corrective action taken by the
    manufacturer, in consultation with the Commission (CPSA Section 19(a)(2)(B)-
    (C), 15 U.S.C.
    Section
    2068(a)(B)-
    (C).

    The law applies to both voluntary recalls by a manufacturer and recalls
    ordered by the Commission.

    The definition of “manufacturer” includes an importer.

    Any person or firm distributing recalled products in commerce may be
    liable.

    It is your responsibility to monitor CPSC recalls and ensure that your
    business complies with the law
    10-20-2016 11:27 AM
  17. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    Well something on Google's own app could explain thermal runaway. I mean it's not far fetched with all these phones that came out around the same time. All it takes is one app to run the cpu through the roof and boom.
    No. Just no.

    For this to happen Samsung would have to:

    1. Be using source code for the kernel that's been significantly altered from what they released
    2. Defeat several safety measures that will throttle the CPU, kill the runaway process, then shut off the phone.
    3. Not use (or incorrectly use) required safety components inside the phone that were there during safety testing and certification.
    4. And do all of this on purpose.

    (Unrelated) Also, since I just can't take reading it anymore, anode-to-cathode is a measurement of battery capacitance and charge. It is not a actual thing, rather an idea. It is not something that can go bad, and Samsung either had a poorly translated document when supplying that excuse or they just said whatever they wanted to say because they are inept.
    10-20-2016 12:47 PM
  18. ateamlawn's Avatar
    No. Just no.

    For this to happen Samsung would have to:

    1. Be using source code for the kernel that's been significantly altered from what they released
    2. Defeat several safety measures that will throttle the CPU, kill the runaway process, then shut off the phone.
    3. Not use (or incorrectly use) required safety components inside the phone that were there during safety testing and certification.
    4. And do all of this on purpose.

    (Unrelated) Also, since I just can't take reading it anymore, anode-to-cathode is a measurement of battery capacitance and charge. It is not a actual thing, rather an idea. It is not something that can go bad, and Samsung either had a poorly translated document when supplying that excuse or they just said whatever they wanted to say because they are inept.
    Glad to hear from you Jerry. Something fishy is going on. Over a million of us still have out Note 7 but the stories have stopped. Doesn't make sense.
    10-20-2016 12:53 PM
  19. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    Glad to hear from you Jerry. Something fishy is going on. Over a million of us still have out Note 7 but the stories have stopped. Doesn't make sense.

    There were never a million defective (first batch) Note 7's sold.

    Second batch: Less than 500,000 were distributed in the US after 90% of the unknown number above were returned.

    Samsung acknowledges 114 total failures (91 from first batch and 23 from second batch) in US models.

    If we take the high figure of 1,000,000 and use it to find the failure rate, it comes out to 0.0114% . A low number, but still about 10 times the normal.


    Samsung goofed somewhere. It can happen to any company, and has happened to a lot of companies. You can not fault Samsung for having a product that almost certainly passed each and every safety test and certification but still had an issue that cause it to fail.

    What is important are the things Samsung did to try and make sure injuries and property damage were kept to a minimum. Unlike most people who write words on the internet for a living, I thought Samsung made the right call the first time by telling people to shut off the phone and stick it in the box to return to the place of purchase. Waiting a week for the CSPC means that one of the people who took Samsung's advise might have been injured had they not stopped using the phone.

    We saw incident after incident the second time while Samsung did wait for a CPSC advisory. We know Samsung was aware, and by not doing anything other than saying they will help any investigations they looked bad. The CPSC is a good thing to have, but sometimes bucking the rules when any government agency is involved is the right call.

    It's important to note that Samsung is not denying any allegations and is doing everything they can to help people return the Note 7, because they think it's not as safe as it should be. This is the responsible course of action, because if someone does get seriously injured that won't go away when they release the next phone. It's good business that also is good for the consumer.

    tl;dr:
    • stuff like this happens.
    • Samsung does not think there is any kind of conspiracy and has accepted responsibility.
    • We don't know why Note 7's failed.
    • Be smart and exchange yours while you still can.


    (Also, incidents are still happening. They aren't getting widespread coverage because there is nothing more to say. Nobody doing what we do for a living wants to kick Samsung while they are down and a million more words about battery failures would bring nothing new. You can subscribe to news feeds from China and Korea if you want to read about them when they happen.)
    10-20-2016 01:21 PM
  20. Aquila's Avatar
    There were never a million defective (first batch) Note 7's sold.
    The first batch was estimated to be almost a million, think I saw a 900k + change shipped to the US and Samsung had said that less than half had made it to consumers (two different sources). That puts a high estimate phones in the hands of consumers at 500k originals and around 300k second wave less returns of each. Do those match up ballpark with whatever information you have access to?
    Almeuit and Laura Knotek like this.
    10-20-2016 03:41 PM
  21. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    The first batch was estimated to be almost a million, think I saw a 900k + change shipped to the US and Samsung had said that less than half had made it to consumers (two different sources). That puts a high estimate phones in the hands of consumers at 500k originals and around 300k second wave less returns of each. Do those match up ballpark with whatever information you have access to?
    Yep. Same numbers.
    Almeuit, FSU30 and Laura Knotek like this.
    10-20-2016 03:49 PM
  22. FSU30's Avatar
    Yep. Same numbers.
    Jerry, thank you, sir, for being active in the forums and elucidating things to people like me that really need a straightforward answer. Keep up the great work!
    10-20-2016 04:22 PM
  23. ateamlawn's Avatar
    Jerry, thank you, sir, for being active in the forums and elucidating things to people like me that really need a straightforward answer. Keep up the great work!
    I also thank you Jerry for chiming in however I disagree with you. Samsung can't afford to through our the conspiracy theory idea but they have gotten their government involved in the the investigation. As I have said before if Samsung really believe this device is unsafe they can simply disable it. Until they do I will continue to use it. People like me can't afford to invest in a phone that we don't want when we have a phone that works perfectly fine. I skipped the Note 5 because I didn't like it. It was the 1st one I skipped since buying the Note 2. There were 2 articles posted in this thread that reported that there are over a million of these phones still in hands of their owners worldwide. I live my odds.
    10-20-2016 05:09 PM
  24. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    I also thank you Jerry for chiming in however I disagree with you. Samsung can't afford to through our the conspiracy theory idea but they have gotten their government involved in the the investigation. As I have said before if Samsung really believe this device is unsafe they can simply disable it. Until they do I will continue to use it. People like me can't afford to invest in a phone that we don't want when we have a phone that works perfectly fine. I skipped the Note 5 because I didn't like it. It was the 1st one I skipped since buying the Note 2. There were 2 articles posted in this thread that reported that there are over a million of these phones still in hands of their owners worldwide. I live my odds.
    Samsung had no choice in the government involvement. Different culture, different ways of doing things and the SK gov really wants to find the issues as fast as they can.

    Samsung isn't going to disable any Note 7s because of liability issues. If you need to dial 911 and they shut your phone off, they are in a bad spot. They will pick a day that returns are no longer being accepted, tell the carriers that they won't be reimbursing them for any more returns, and the carriers will just blacklist every single Note 7 imei.

    I understand others are saying there are over a million in the wild, but Samsung has said differently. I'm not trying to change your mind about anything, I only hope if something does happen nobody else gets hurt or has their property damaged. Your decision is yours alone to make, and we (at Samsung's behest) just want to make sure you have all the information available.

    Stay safe man.
    Aquila, ateamlawn and Laura Knotek like this.
    10-20-2016 05:19 PM
  25. Aquila's Avatar
    I only hope if something does happen nobody else gets hurt or has their property damaged. Your decision is yours alone to make, and we (at Samsung's behest) just want to make sure you have all the information available.

    Stay safe man.
    I agree 100% with this. I can't make you keep it or return it, but I do sincerely hope your device doesn't become one we read about.
    10-20-2016 05:24 PM
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