12-03-2016 03:34 PM
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  1. Preach2k's Avatar
    There are a lot of people in the U.S. still using Note 7's.
    11-29-2016 05:33 PM
  2. donm527's Avatar
    Galaxy Note 7 explosions explanation coming by the end of the year | BGR

    Hopefully we do get some final word on this and closure by Samsung at end of year. Hey if the news is positive maybe we get refurbs and I'll consider it. Otherwise a few months really will fly by and we'll hear S8 and possible Note 8 info.
    11-29-2016 05:34 PM
  3. Aquila's Avatar
    I disagree. You telling me that the reason the reports have stopped in the US is because the product was cancelled? So I am the only one in the US using the phone?
    I'm not sure, but I think he means it's because population has been severely reduced. We went from having a total of around 800-900 thousand devices, to less than 50,000 (as of a couple weeks ago) - and since we were presumably already at a rate of between 1/1000 and 1/10,000, we could expect that there are a tiny handful of possible cases still out there - the ability for one to escape the mainstream news seems pretty high. So either they aren't happening, or they're happening so infrequently as to not be news any longer.
    11-29-2016 05:35 PM
  4. Almeuit's Avatar
    I disagree. You telling me that the reason the reports have stopped in the US is because the product was cancelled? So I am the only one in the US using the phone?
    No -- I meant that news places / blogs stopped reporting due to the phone now being canceled. Plus 85% (I think that was it) returned probably also helps.
    11-29-2016 05:44 PM
  5. u71n4444's Avatar
    Still using mine
    11-30-2016 02:44 AM
  6. pkcable's Avatar
    Would it be too much if I posted a picture of someone beating a dead horse?
    11-30-2016 08:20 AM
  7. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    Literally a dead horse. Of course people took advantage of the chaos for what they hoped would be a quick payday. My guess is, 99.9 percent of them failed or will fail because they'd have to submit the phone as evidence. Any incidents not easily provable will be tied up in litigation for years. Anyone faking it probably will not wait it out.

    Enough were legitimate enough for Samsung to cancel the phone, bottom line.
    pkcable likes this.
    11-30-2016 04:27 PM
  8. donm527's Avatar
    12-01-2016 04:48 AM
  9. pkcable's Avatar
    Only a matter of time before this happens in the US!
    12-01-2016 07:41 AM
  10. natehoy's Avatar
    You said all that to say what??

    1. I have a Note Edge that's fully functional and READY to go.

    2. They have to COMPLETELY disable the phone for me to login to my Sprint account, click on Note Edge and be back up and running. It's just not that serious. I'm keeping and using the phone. Next?
    Apologies, I thought you had some expectation that once it was disabled you would be able to return it and get some money back. You probably won't. Your phone, your money, your choice. Enjoy.
    12-01-2016 07:50 AM
  11. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    Apologies, I thought you had some expectation that once it was disabled you would be able to return it and get some money back. You probably won't. Your phone, your money, your choice. Enjoy.
    Appreciate the concern but I will be fine. Thx!!
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    12-01-2016 11:54 AM
  12. jmnesq's Avatar
    Just keep in mind that once Sammy or Sprint send a complete disable signal to your phone, the recall period will be over and their liability will be discharged by running a successful (and expensive) recall campaign. They have no reason to offer you any money to take it back after that point, so there won't be any "powers that be" to submit it to.

    Your money, your choice. But the phone will shift immediately from "Sammy will pay you a bonus to turn it in" to "Sammy don't care - it's your problem now" as soon as the recall period is over and liability shifts 100% to you.

    Ummmm... this is not true.
    kevinpleasants likes this.
    12-02-2016 02:36 PM
  13. KupKrazy's Avatar
    The reports of exploding Note7s died down immediately after that final weekend when they announced the final recall. The line about there being less Note7s in use as a reason for the reports dying down are IMHO hogwash. We went from daily reports to no reports while at that time, according to Samsung, about well over 70% of people did not return their Note7s. I'm not saying that the reports were untrue but I keep reading that being used as an excuse and it just wasn't true at the offset. Someone here posted practically a daily report of links to Note7 fires but then after the announcement after that weekend, all of a sudden there were no more reports or perhaps just one more.

    I don't have my Note7 anymore and the reason I returned it is because I didn't want to eventually get stuck at a time when I could no longer return it consider I paid full price. I had bought it at Best Buy and I recall hearing from a rep that they didn't expect them to keep taking them in forever since they had to be shipped in a special box which stores wouldn't carry forever.. and at that point it might be an issue between me and Samsung.. Yeah, good luck to me trying to work that out.

    I didn't want to let it go, but it is what it is. I do firmly feel that this was all blown well out of proportion and when the media picked up on it - they became vultures trying to wait for the next story to happen because people WANTED to hear it. There definitely may have been problems but the sudden silence in reports that came immediately after the recall announcement was astounding.
    juliesdroidsync likes this.
    12-03-2016 01:15 PM
  14. Aquila's Avatar
    The line about there being less Note7s in use as a reason for the reports dying down are IMHO hogwash. We went from daily reports to no reports while at that time, according to Samsung, about well over 70% of people did not return their Note7s.
    As of November 5th, so basically 4 weeks ago, over 85% of Note 7's in the wild had been returned and almost 100% of the ones still at retailers were back processed for return. At that time, less than 50,000 of the 700,000 - 800,000 Note 7's sold to consumers in the US were still in the wild. I believe the 70% that you're referring to was from October 25th when they said around 70% of the Note 7 customers intended to remain with Samsung, either by planning to buy the S8 and future products or by directly switching to the S7/S7 Edge, etc.
    12-03-2016 01:26 PM
  15. KupKrazy's Avatar
    As of November 5th, so basically 4 weeks ago, over 85% of Note 7's in the wild had been returned and almost 100% of the ones still at retailers were back processed for return. At that time, less than 50,000 of the 700,000 - 800,000 Note 7's sold to consumers in the US were still in the wild. I believe the 70% that you're referring to was from October 25th when they said around 70% of the Note 7 customers intended to remain with Samsung, either by planning to buy the S8 and future products or by directly switching to the S7/S7 Edge, etc.
    No, I'm talking about the week or two after the final recall was announced.in mid October. All the daily reports of fires suddenly ended after speculation Samsung would make an announcement on Oct 9 and then they subsequently officially announced I think on the 13th. There is no way the majority of phones were returned during those 2 weeks and there were reports before November about how well more than half in the US were still not returned. I personally did not return mine until November since I was traveling. The stories of Note7 fires stopped or were diminished greatly well before the "As of November 5th" date.
    12-03-2016 01:38 PM
  16. Aquila's Avatar
    No, I'm talking about the week or two after the final recall was announced.in mid October. All the daily reports of fires suddenly ended after speculation Samsung would make an announcement on Oct 9 and then they subsequently officially announced I think on the 13th. There is no way the majority of phones were returned during those 2 weeks and there were reports before November about how well more than half in the US were still not returned. I personally did not return mine until November since I was traveling. The stories of Note7 fires stopped or were diminished greatly well before the "As of November 5th" date.
    Ok, I don't have the statements from Samsung you're referencing, but on November 5th they announced that more than 85% of the Note 7's had been turned in and the two numbers given for phones in the US were less than 40,000 and less than 50,000 still in the wild. Given that was 4 weeks ago, the number is probably much smaller by now.

    October 9th is on or about the day that the carriers stopped selling them and was when the recall was initiated. At that time there were around 300,000 Note 7's in the wild so it's obviously not only possible, but incredibly likely that between 10/9 and 11/5 it'd be very easy to have 250,000 of them turned in during that 4 week period.

    This is given that in the period between the first recall (9/2) and just 8 days after they resumed sales (9/21) in the US on 9/29, over 95% of Note 7 devices in the US from the original recall were returned, which was over 425,000 devices in 4 weeks.
    12-03-2016 01:59 PM
  17. KupKrazy's Avatar
    Ok, I don't have the statements from Samsung you're referencing, but on November 5th they announced that more than 85% of the Note 7's had been turned in and the two numbers given for phones in the US were less than 40,000 and less than 50,000 still in the wild. Given that was 4 weeks ago, the number is probably much smaller by now.

    October 9th is on or about the day that the carriers stopped selling them and was when the recall was initiated. At that time there were around 300,000 Note 7's in the wild so it's obviously not only possible, but incredibly likely that between 10/9 and 11/5 it'd be very easy to have 250,000 of them turned in during that 4 week period.

    This is given that in the period between the first recall (9/2) and just 8 days after they resumed sales (9/21) in the US on 9/29, over 95% of Note 7 devices in the US from the original recall were returned, which was over 425,000 devices in 4 weeks.
    I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to point out. The statement from Samsung referring to their recall is still on their site - that came a few days after Oct. 9. You were here on the forums during that span, right? There were constant reports of fires the week or two leading up to Oct 9 and then after then, they all practically stopped. The Verge had no more articles all of a sudden. Exactly how much of an impact in the amount of Note7s in the wild could have possibly shifted over a weekend even before Samsung officially made their final recall statement?

    I find it hard to believe that there were only 300k Note7s in the wild on Oct. 9, but regardless, it's not the point. I am not sure if you recall (no pun intended) how difficult it was during the first weeks of the official final recall to actually get information from the carriers to take the device back. The point is that right after Oct 9, when it's highly likely the number of Note7s that were in the wild right before Oct 9 was similar, the reports all but stopped and perhaps there was one other one in China and a report about a GS7e. So right on Oct. 9 or a day after, everyone who had a Note7 either returned it or turned it off, which accounts for there being no more fires reports. That part, I do not buy.

    Whether they had 300k or 3million out there before Oct 9, the bottom line is that the reports practically stopped immediately.
    12-03-2016 02:32 PM
  18. nahoku's Avatar
    Not every single Note 7 will catch fire... this is already known... by the fact that not every single Note 7 has caught fire. However, Samsung saw enough potential in this happening to pull the entire line... at great expense. I can hardly wait for some regular on this board to lose their Note 7 because it caught fire... then everyone can jump on him and say it's a false report! Not wishing bad on anyone, but how much will it take to convince people to turn in the phone? Do they need their very own Note 7 to catch fire? Judging from the comments on this board, I'm going to guess the answer to that question is... Yes! Good luck, you all!
    pkcable likes this.
    12-03-2016 03:12 PM
  19. Aquila's Avatar
    It's even more simple. Out of hundreds of cases, 26 are alleged to be false - and of those 26, 15 or more are demonstrably not verified as being false claims. This trash reporting makes it sound like 26 people lied and the fact is that the article itself is lying about more than half of the cases it lumped into the 26.

    Since we don't have a global count of reports, let's just say the number is 200 reports. That's obviously low, because over 100 happened in the US and the US accounted for merely 40% of sales globally. So we should expect at least 250 reports to have been confirmed by Samsung, but we can use 200. If 11 out of 200 are alleged to be false, then 95% of reports are assumed to be true. But the article has 26 cases, 15 of which are falsely reported as being false reports (hope I said that right) - so it has a maximum accuracy rate of around 45%.

    That means that 95% of cases can be assumed to be true + nearly half of the remaining 5% due to the fictitious nature of the tech blog report. That means we're in the 97-98% of cases being true, and if there are only 200 globally, that'd mean roughly 3 in every 100 reports *might* be false, however we don't actually know.

    So to give the conspiracy theorists as much ammunition as possible to continue beating the dead horse - let's go ahead and give then 10 times as many false reports. Let's say 60 reports were false out of the 200 cases. That'd mean 140, which is a low figure, because we know over 100 were in the US alone. Can you name another device that has 140 units experience spontaneously inside of a 60 day period?

    Here's the thing. No matter how this gets parsed out, the simple fact is that Samsung recognized that the rate of failure was WAY higher than any other device and that it posed a safety risk to their customers and so they voluntarily accepted a $20 Billion, with a frickin' B, write down. That's $20,000,000,000 in expense + lost revenue and doesn't include the damage to their brand.

    The idea that this entire thing is an elaborate hoax is just preposterous and the leaps in logic in order to continue to espouse that claim are simply logically perverse. That isn't to say that the logic behind wanting to keep the device is wrong, the risk is very low relative to many other every day tasks. But to pretend there isn't and never was an issue is just nonsensical. And thankfully this article can be used to highlight the ridiculousness when put into context alongside the actual facts that have come out regarding this situation.
    7AndTRT, nahoku and pkcable like this.
    12-03-2016 03:34 PM
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