01-29-2018 08:16 PM
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  1. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Did you ever get it to work? This happened to my N8 about 2 weeks ago!


    My phone went to zero one night, I plugged it in, got a small lightening bolt, but not the usual charging dial. I didn't think much of it, went to do other things, a minute or two later, I heard it vibrate/buzz a could of times (thought that's wierd, it's not booted), went to look at it, and it was dead. Just like the yours, nothing would revive it, it was dead dead.


    I wound up replacing it under warranty. The problem with warranty is you get recycled/rebuilt phone. I had to reload all my apps thru the PlayStore because the activation process is flawed. When you get to the step where it reloads your apps, the screen just goes black and the phone locks up; I had to hard reboot. After two retries, I skipped this step, and went thru the PlayStore.


    Luckily, I use Nova Launcher and had backed up, and was able to get my apps & screens reorganized quickly


    Maybe somebody can help me out. The biggest pain with a new phone it all your android settings are gone, trusted places/devices, security settings, VPN, etc. If there's a way to completely image all your settings, I'm not aware of it.
    Never let it go below 20%. Your battery will last MUCH longer. I don't understand why everyone refuses take this into consideration!
    01-24-2018 12:24 PM
  2. pchain's Avatar
    Never let it go below 20%. Your battery will last MUCH longer. I don't understand why everyone refuses take this into consideration!
    Sometimes it's unavoidable - it's not just a simple matter of refusing to understand proper battery management.
    01-24-2018 12:34 PM
  3. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Sometimes it's unavoidable - it's not just a simple matter of refusing to understand proper battery management.
    It is always avoidable if you plan ahead. Keep a charger or extended battery case with you or just turn it off if not needed during certain times. Also tweak settings etc. as described all over the place.
    01-24-2018 12:58 PM
  4. pchain's Avatar
    It is always avoidable if you plan ahead. Keep a charger or extended battery case with you or just turn it off if not needed during certain times. Also tweak settings etc. as described all over the place.
    Life happens. It's not always avoidable. Your point is well taken however if you can plan ahead.

    But sometimes you simply can't know what will happen on any given day to you, your phone, your vehicle, your chargers, the cellular network, your WiFi connection, app updates, etc..... unless of course you are omniscient. LOL
    01-24-2018 01:42 PM
  5. Note8uzer's Avatar
    Well I’m just saying it’s hard to believe people find it acceptable or persons fault that phone can’t handle going to zero... if newer phones can’t be expected to do that when older phones can... battery technology has gone backwards in that area IMO. I find it unacceptable if happens to me even though I am anal in making sure I charge properly. Guess we’ll agree to disagree.
    It is the user's fault for letting the phone go to zero. Nobody else can be blamed. If nothing else, shut the phone off until you can charge it.

    I ran my battery down to 0 percent on purpose and the phone shut off. I plugged the phone in and it turned on, I charged the phone and away I went. Besides being careless, I'm thinking he has a phone issue. Not all Note 8 phones die at zero percent.
    01-24-2018 02:01 PM
  6. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Life happens. It's not always avoidable. Your point is well taken however if you can plan ahead.

    But sometimes you simply can't know what will happen on any given day to you, your phone, your vehicle, your chargers, the cellular network, your WiFi connection, app updates, etc..... unless of course you are omniscient. LOL
    Yes it is always avoidable. Don't let it reach anything below 20%. If it does, turned it off or charge it. If you don't do that, then you have made a conscious choice to not take any action and let it die. So when you are saying it's not always avoidable, what you really mean is, you decided to ignore the issue and let it happen. If it goes to zero when you didn't realize it, that just means it's not that important to you and you decided to allow yourself to forget about it and let it die.
    01-25-2018 12:25 AM
  7. pchain's Avatar
    Yes it is always avoidable. Don't let it reach anything below 20%. If it does, turned it off or charge it. If you don't do that, then you have made a conscious choice to not take any action and let it die. So when you are saying it's not always avoidable, what you really mean is, you decided to ignore the issue and let it happen. If it goes to zero when you didn't realize it, that just means it's not that important to you and you decided to allow yourself to forget about it and let it die.
    Unfortunately, you're completely missing my point here, but that's alright, you are otherwise doing an excellent job of explaining how to minimize the likelihood of running into the issue.

    Unless you live in a world where you completely know about and have complete control over every aspect of it, the best you can do is minimize the potential for and impact from unexpected things happening.

    My point being when you speak in terms of absolutes (always or never) you will likely run into misunderstandings, and also risk coming across as conceited. You wouldn't want to do that because it devalues your otherwise good remarks.

    There is an infinite number of possibilities that can occur beyond your own level of control and planning. To argue that is unproductive.

    But then again, maybe you are omniscient, in which case you already know I'm not arguing with you but simply trying to lend you some advice. :-)
    Ryano89 likes this.
    01-25-2018 02:02 AM
  8. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Unfortunately, you're completely missing my point here, but that's alright, you are otherwise doing an excellent job of explaining how to minimize the likelihood of running into the issue.

    Unless you live in a world where you completely know about and have complete control over every aspect of it, the best you can do is minimize the potential for and impact from unexpected things happening.

    My point being when you speak in terms of absolutes (always or never) you will likely run into misunderstandings, and also risk coming across as conceited. You wouldn't want to do that because it devalues your otherwise good remarks.

    There is an infinite number of possibilities that can occur beyond your own level of control and planning. To argue that is unproductive.

    But then again, maybe you are omniscient, in which case you already know I'm not arguing with you but simply trying to lend you some advice. :-)
    Sorry if I came across as conceited. Does your phone run down to 0% often? Are you comfortable with an extended battery case like a Mophie?
    01-25-2018 06:39 AM
  9. pchain's Avatar
    Sorry if I came across as conceited. Does your phone run down to 0% often? Are you comfortable with an extended battery case like a Mophie?
    As a rule I try not to run my phones down below 10 or 15%. Most days I don't go below 25 or 30%. I charge on a slow charger each night and start at 100% each morning.

    I also try to always charge to 100% whenever i do charge rather than charging for short bursts here and there. Not sure that makes any difference but seems like a good idea to me.

    I've never considered a battery case, I really don't require one.

    I have had a couple phones from different manufacturers that have shown 20+% and shut off 15 minutes later. It's like the phone doesn't know how much battery is actually left and needs to be recalibrated. In such cases I use the original OEM charger and charge to 100% before turning on again. Of course occasionally restarting the phone on a regular basis is a good practice as well.

    I know battery tech has changed a bit over the years so i admit I am probably not current with the dos and don'ts of battery management.
    01-25-2018 12:42 PM
  10. Gayle Lynn's Avatar
    I think the software trying to guess how much battery juice and time is.... Guessing. Dark art voodoo to be taken with grain salt.
    pchain likes this.
    01-25-2018 12:56 PM
  11. Almeuit's Avatar
    It is the user's fault for letting the phone go to zero. Nobody else can be blamed. If nothing else, shut the phone off until you can charge it.

    I ran my battery down to 0 percent on purpose and the phone shut off. I plugged the phone in and it turned on, I charged the phone and away I went. Besides being careless, I'm thinking he has a phone issue. Not all Note 8 phones die at zero percent.
    I don't think it is acceptable for your phone to perma die when it hits 0-1% battery. It should shut itself off so it can be charged later.

    I rarely ever let my phone get that low but if I was it shouldn't just die permanently because it did. Sorry that isn't normal by any case and even Samsung agrees hence them trying to replace the units that showed this behavior.. So I am kind of lost how you could be okay with it or blame a user when even the phone maker agrees that is wrong.
    01-25-2018 05:57 PM
  12. MarcoB2's Avatar
    Never let it go below 20%. Your battery will last MUCH longer. I don't understand why everyone refuses take this into consideration!
    Maybe because there's no consensus that this is actually the optimal way of increasing battery life?

    How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University

    See table 2 and table 4.

    80% depth of discharge instead of 100% increases the number of cycles by between 33% and 50%.

    But charging to 80% instead of to 100% increases the number of cycles by between 280% and 300%.

    So, according to the source above, if you want to trade individual runtime for battery longevity, it is far better to use the bottom 80% than the top 80%. In other words, your battery will last far longer if you keep it between 0% and 80% than between 20% and 100%.

    Two considerations specific to Note 8:

    1) Battery safety circuit should shut the device down before battery is completely depleted and permanently damaged, so 0%, as reported by the device, should still be within safe range. This may not be the case for a small number of Note 8 devices according to reports. This is absolutely the fault of the device, not the user, and it is completely unacceptable. Samsung acknowledged this by admitting there's a problem instead of blaming it on the users. It is your call how you want to proceed here. I deliberately drained my Note 8 after finding this out because if my device is affected I would rather have it replaced than to try to go out of my way to work around the issue.

    2) Note 8 charges the battery to 4.3V instead of a more common 4.2V. So if we take a more common 4.2V to be 100% Note's battery is charged to between 110 and 115%. Consistently, charging to 4.3V instead of 4.2V increases the runtime slightly but halves the battery life, just like dropping the voltage by 0.1V decreases individual runtime by the same amount and doubles the number of cycles.
    pchain and KruseLudsMobile like this.
    01-27-2018 12:14 PM
  13. j_hansen's Avatar
    not really important unless you plan to keep your Note for 3 or 4 years which maybe only 1% of Note owners do, I'm charging whenever it's handy and to keep going as like most other Note owners, I'll be getting the next one anyway, even if I keep one of my Note 8s when the Note 9 comes out it will not go through many charging cycles before two years are up on the battery and it will still be just fine for the next owner
    kj11 likes this.
    01-27-2018 12:39 PM
  14. jimd1050's Avatar
    Maybe because there's no consensus that this is actually the optimal way of increasing battery life?

    How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University

    See table 2 and table 4.

    80% depth of discharge instead of 100% increases the number of cycles by between 33% and 50%.

    But charging to 80% instead of to 100% increases the number of cycles by between 280% and 300%.

    So, according to the source above, if you want to trade individual runtime for battery longevity, it is far better to use the bottom 80% than the top 80%. In other words, your battery will last far longer if you keep it between 0% and 80% than between 20% and 100%.

    Two considerations specific to Note 8:

    1) Battery safety circuit should shut the device down before battery is completely depleted and permanently damaged, so 0%, as reported by the device, should still be within safe range. This may not be the case for a small number of Note 8 devices according to reports. This is absolutely the fault of the device, not the user, and it is completely unacceptable. Samsung acknowledged this by admitting there's a problem instead of blaming it on the users. It is your call how you want to proceed here. I deliberately drained my Note 8 after finding this out because if my device is affected I would rather have it replaced than to try to go out of my way to work around the issue.

    2) Note 8 charges the battery to 4.3V instead of a more common 4.2V. So if we take a more common 4.2V to be 100% Note's battery is charged to between 110 and 115%. Consistently, charging to 4.3V instead of 4.2V increases the runtime slightly but halves the battery life, just like dropping the voltage by 0.1V decreases individual runtime by the same amount and doubles the number of cycles.
    Wow!
    01-27-2018 12:55 PM
  15. als369's Avatar
    Happened to me twice. I'm ony third . Thank God for the year warranty
    01-27-2018 10:56 PM
  16. als369's Avatar
    Happened to me twice. I'm ony third . Thank God for the year warranty
    I'm on my*
    01-27-2018 10:57 PM
  17. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Maybe because there's no consensus that this is actually the optimal way of increasing battery life?

    How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University

    See table 2 and table 4.

    80% depth of discharge instead of 100% increases the number of cycles by between 33% and 50%.

    But charging to 80% instead of to 100% increases the number of cycles by between 280% and 300%.

    So, according to the source above, if you want to trade individual runtime for battery longevity, it is far better to use the bottom 80% than the top 80%. In other words, your battery will last far longer if you keep it between 0% and 80% than between 20% and 100%.

    Two considerations specific to Note 8:

    1) Battery safety circuit should shut the device down before battery is completely depleted and permanently damaged, so 0%, as reported by the device, should still be within safe range. This may not be the case for a small number of Note 8 devices according to reports. This is absolutely the fault of the device, not the user, and it is completely unacceptable. Samsung acknowledged this by admitting there's a problem instead of blaming it on the users. It is your call how you want to proceed here. I deliberately drained my Note 8 after finding this out because if my device is affected I would rather have it replaced than to try to go out of my way to work around the issue.

    2) Note 8 charges the battery to 4.3V instead of a more common 4.2V. So if we take a more common 4.2V to be 100% Note's battery is charged to between 110 and 115%. Consistently, charging to 4.3V instead of 4.2V increases the runtime slightly but halves the battery life, just like dropping the voltage by 0.1V decreases individual runtime by the same amount and doubles the number of cycles.
    Thank you for setting me straight and for this information. Where did you get it? Can you send a link? For example, the Samsung charging the battery to the equivalent of 110% or 120%?
    01-28-2018 07:49 AM
  18. MarcoB2's Avatar
    Thank you for setting me straight and for this information. Where did you get it? Can you send a link? For example, the Samsung charging the battery to the equivalent of 110% or 120%?
    I dug into it further and I take that back, article I was reading wrongly stated that they are using regular cells. Samsung is using lithium cells with graphene additive that are rated to 3.85V nominal and 4.4V charging voltage. When charged to 4.4V they should have similar lifespan as standard cells charged to 4.2V. So no issues in that regard, if anything Samsung is slightly undercharging them.
    KruseLudsMobile likes this.
    01-28-2018 12:23 PM
  19. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    I dug into it further and I take that back, article I was reading wrongly stated that they are using regular cells. Samsung is using lithium cells with graphene additive that are rated to 3.85V nominal and 4.4V charging voltage. When charged to 4.4V they should have similar lifespan as standard cells charged to 4.2V. So no issues in that regard, if anything Samsung is slightly undercharging them.
    Yeah sorry I didn't realize you already supplied the link for your research.
    01-29-2018 08:16 PM
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