02-27-2018 05:54 AM
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  1. Fred98TJ's Avatar
    01-01-2018 06:45 PM
  2. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    I have yet to run my N8 down to 0 charge. Sometime during the warranty period, perhaps, I should purposefully do that to see if it will recharge. Yet, even if it does once is no guarantee it would continue to do so. Furthermore, it isn't good for the battery to run it down like that even as a test. I hope, therefore, that Samsung will replace or fix a phone outside of the warranty period should it have a charging problem. Maybe my hope, however, is a pipe dream.
    01-01-2018 09:02 PM
  3. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    I have yet to run my N8 down to 0 charge. Sometime during the warranty period, perhaps, I should purposefully do that to see if it will recharge. Yet, even if it does once is no guarantee it would continue to do so. Furthermore, it isn't good for the battery to run it down like that even as a test. I hope, therefore, that Samsung will replace or fix a phone outside of the warranty period should it have a charging problem. Maybe my hope, however, is a pipe dream.
    I wouldn't recommend it. Besides, I'm not entirely sure it's a phone problem. My wife accidentally ran hers down to zero today and it charged back up with no worries. It shut off on its own and when I put it on my wireless charger it showed it charging. It powered up with no problems.

    It's possible that certain apps (likely games) could shut down the safety shutdown feature to get maximum performance. If that's the case, then it's possible for the phone run down past the safe battery level. In other words, there is a lot of information missing about this and Samsung is just knee jerking and trying to take control of the narrative. It is a little gun shy because of last year's Note 7 debacle.
    01-01-2018 10:15 PM
  4. Fred98TJ's Avatar
    And it’s a good thing that Samsung is acknowledging because of last years 7 problems. They certainly don’t want to ignore another possible battery problem.
    Samsung is trying to be somewhat proactive and that’s a good thing.
    If it is an app or game that’s somehow disabling the battery safety systems (and i really don’t believe that to be the case) then this is a very serious bug in the SW (Samsung’s and/or androids).
    If an app can do that then it can allow for overcharging (again protected by the build in safety systems, which is almost certainly HW) and cause fires or explosions.
    01-01-2018 11:17 PM
  5. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    Yes you're correct about the potential problems that overriding the safety features could have. I've read up a little more on LiIon and LiPoly batteries. The protection circuit is built into the battery and not the OS, so overriding it is nearly impossible.

    So the only way for batteries to reach the point to not be able to charge would be if the the over discharge protection circuit or the controlling firmware could be bad or corrupted.

    In any case the not charging once the battery goes below 2.7v safety feature still works.

    https://www.quora.com/Why-cant-lithi...h-zero-percent
    Gayle Lynn likes this.
    01-01-2018 11:34 PM
  6. Rukbat's Avatar
    First, discharging the battery even below 40% isn't healthy for the battery's life span. (Especially in a phone with a non-removable battery).

    Second, charging a lithium battery that's been drained down to 0 can cause an explosion and/or fire, which is why the safety feature in all lithium batteries. gernerttl, I suspect that your wife's shutoff point is a bit above 0, so even though her phone shut off, the battery wasn't fully discharged. But discharging it to close to 0 on every charge cycle will kill the battery in a few months. (The manufacturers don't tell us that, because battery replacement is a high-profit job.)

    If you can't charge the battery when it drops below 40%, shut it off. It's seldom worth $60 (unless Samsung raised the price) to do whatever you're doing at that point.
    LuvULongTime likes this.
    01-02-2018 02:18 PM
  7. 103Softail's Avatar
    It's called "Max Power Saving Mode"
    01-02-2018 04:49 PM
  8. Almeuit's Avatar
    Glad to see they have acknowledged it and are working with the ones that are experiencing the issue.
    01-02-2018 05:13 PM
  9. LuvULongTime's Avatar
    First, discharging the battery even below 40% isn't healthy for the battery's life span. (Especially in a phone with a non-removable battery).

    Second, charging a lithium battery that's been drained down to 0 can cause an explosion and/or fire, which is why the safety feature in all lithium batteries. gernerttl, I suspect that your wife's shutoff point is a bit above 0, so even though her phone shut off, the battery wasn't fully discharged. But discharging it to close to 0 on every charge cycle will kill the battery in a few months. (The manufacturers don't tell us that, because battery replacement is a high-profit job.)

    If you can't charge the battery when it drops below 40%, shut it off. It's seldom worth $60 (unless Samsung raised the price) to do whatever you're doing at that point.
    This is interesting. I need to do more reading on batteries. I haven't always observed the 40% recharge rule. I always thought that recharging too often would also shorten the batteries life span.
    01-02-2018 05:34 PM
  10. LuvULongTime's Avatar
    On another note (no pun intended), how difficult would it be to replace the battery on these phones?
    01-02-2018 05:38 PM
  11. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    This is interesting. I need to do more reading on batteries. I haven't always observed the 40% recharge rule. I always thought that recharging too often would also shorten the batteries life span.
    I've never heard of that rule either. LiIon and LiPoly batteries start to degrade after about 750ish (laptops are around 1000) cycles.

    One cycle is from "zero" to full charge. So, if you charge at 40% to 100%, pull it off the charger and put it back on at 60% and charge until 100% that counts as one cycle.

    That means on average, it'll take approximately two years before you see any significant battery degradation. That's why I threw the BS flag for Apple's explanation of why they were throttling the CPUs of its iPhone 6s an 7 phones.
    LuvULongTime likes this.
    01-02-2018 10:39 PM
  12. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    On another note (no pun intended), how difficult would it be to replace the battery on these phones?
    I wouldn't try it. Without the proper tools and parts you'd lose the IP68 rating. That's one of the reasons why I got the S8+ and now a Note 8.
    LuvULongTime likes this.
    01-02-2018 10:41 PM
  13. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    First, discharging the battery even below 40% isn't healthy for the battery's life span. (Especially in a phone with a non-removable battery).

    Second, charging a lithium battery that's been drained down to 0 can cause an explosion and/or fire, which is why the safety feature in all lithium batteries. gernerttl, I suspect that your wife's shutoff point is a bit above 0, so even though her phone shut off, the battery wasn't fully discharged. But discharging it to close to 0 on every charge cycle will kill the battery in a few months. (The manufacturers don't tell us that, because battery replacement is a high-profit job.)

    If you can't charge the battery when it drops below 40%, shut it off. It's seldom worth $60 (unless Samsung raised the price) to do whatever you're doing at that point.
    As far as the OS is concerned, it shuts off at 0%. The protection chip tells the OS via firmware what the battery reading is. Meaning that 0% = 2.7v (depending on manufacturer).

    Discharging past 2.7v won't cause a fire. It happens if you try to recharge a LiIon/LiPoly battery once it's gone below 2.7v.
    01-02-2018 10:50 PM
  14. magichoward's Avatar
    Don't forget Samsung has guaranteed theat after two years use we will only lose 2 percent of our charge.. No mention of how you charge it
    01-02-2018 11:37 PM
  15. Almeuit's Avatar
    Don't forget Samsung has guaranteed theat after two years use we will only lose 2 percent of our charge.. No mention of how you charge it
    Not sure if that is really the case here since the main issue is them dying completely.
    01-03-2018 12:05 AM
  16. Blues Fan's Avatar
    If I were this guy I'd be livid buying a brand new phone less than a month old and they send you a refurb with wear on it.

    01-03-2018 01:07 AM
  17. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Good that they’re acknowledging it.

    BUT, replace them with new phones. Replacing them with refurbished units just seems like a slap in the face, especially when you’re that guy who bought a brand new unit less than a month ago.

    I know companies are just going to do the absolute minimum when it comes to issues but when you’re getting PR attention, what you don’t want is more PR attention of the negative kind and to my eye, replacing a phone which is still brand new with one that’s older due to it being a refurb is um.....pretty bad in terms of PR.
    01-03-2018 03:18 AM
  18. Iva_LadyDiCaprio98's Avatar
    I've had my phone drop to 0% a few times and always managed to get my phone to charge. So far *knock on wood* I've not had any problems with charging and I've has this phone since September
    01-03-2018 07:26 AM
  19. anon(5630457)'s Avatar
    Second, charging a lithium battery that's been drained down to 0 can cause an explosion and/or fire, which is why the safety feature in all lithium batteries.
    That's not true at all. Otherwise, there'd be mini bombs going off every day.
    01-03-2018 10:47 AM
  20. anon(7901790)'s Avatar
    I've had my phone drop to 0% a few times and always managed to get my phone to charge. So far *knock on wood* I've not had any problems with charging and I've has this phone since September
    That's because you're not one of the few with a defective battery (or at least a battery with defective/corrupted firmware). To be honest, had the Note 7 debacle not happened, this would be a non-issue.
    01-03-2018 11:37 AM
  21. Blues Fan's Avatar
    Good that they’re acknowledging it.

    BUT, replace them with new phones. Replacing them with refurbished units just seems like a slap in the face, especially when you’re that guy who bought a brand new unit less than a month ago.

    I know companies are just going to do the absolute minimum when it comes to issues but when you’re getting PR attention, what you don’t want is more PR attention of the negative kind and to my eye, replacing a phone which is still brand new with one that’s older due to it being a refurb is um.....pretty bad in terms of PR.
    If it was within the return period and the carrier wouldn't swap it out for a new one I would totally be fuming, would even consider some kind of legal action.
    01-03-2018 12:04 PM
  22. Cherries01's Avatar
    Since day one (Sept), haven't encountered any charging issues. I do Fast charge when I'm at work or on the road, but I use the older samsung wireless slow charger when I'm charging over night.
    01-03-2018 03:19 PM
  23. kirksucks's Avatar
    Its funny seeing all the "replacement battery" stuff. especially since no batteries are removable and when I had battery issues before with my Note 4 my insurance wouldn't just send me a new battery, they would send me a whole new (refurb) phone. Now I'm hearing that they will only "repair" phones which is essentially just putting a new battery in.
    01-03-2018 08:24 PM
  24. Blues Fan's Avatar
    Its funny seeing all the "replacement battery" stuff. especially since no batteries are removable and when I had battery issues before with my Note 4 my insurance wouldn't just send me a new battery, they would send me a whole new (refurb) phone. Now I'm hearing that they will only "repair" phones which is essentially just putting a new battery in.
    That's why I mentioned if this happens if you're better off going to Cellaris, Sprint store (some have repair techs) Batteries Plus or another repair shop and just pay to have a new battery installed rather than rolling the dice with Samsung and possibly taking weeks AND getting a refurb with scratches sent to you.

    Does anyone know what a factory battery runs for this phone? I can't find it for sale on Aliexpress yet.

    I would rather take it to a shop knowing I get my actual phone back.
    01-03-2018 08:55 PM
  25. Doug Moffat's Avatar
    And this all could have been avoided if Samsung had not chosen "style" and eliminated the replaceable battery.
    01-07-2018 03:10 PM
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