1. justme0485's Avatar
    Should you use a mobile security app for your android? If so what is good?
    12-01-2018 08:00 PM
  2. dieseldude's Avatar
    In my opinion you dont need anything like that if you download apps from a trusted source or avoid web sites that seem suspicious.
    12-01-2018 08:59 PM
  3. Chromium 4's Avatar
    I've always used Lookout on all my devices. Not only does it have anti-malware and security features, it also backs up your contacts and can track a lost phone. It runs in the background and does not use a lot of battery juice.
    12-02-2018 02:02 AM
  4. B. Diddy's Avatar
    My usual spiel:

    For the most part, it's still quite difficult to get an actual virus on your phone, because malware requires you to manually accept the installation (which is why they try to fool you into thinking you're installing something legitimate). Use common sense:

    1. Avoid shady websites that deal with things like porn, gambling, and "free" (aka pirated) apps/music/movies.

    2. Never ever tap on a link that appears in a popup while browsing, especially if they're warning you that your phone is infected -- they're just trying to scare you into installing some bogus "antivirus" app that is probably malicious itself.

    3. Only install apps from well-established app sources like Google Play Store or Amazon Appstore. Read a bunch of app reviews before installing an app to look for any complaints about adware or suspected malware.

    4. Turn on Google Play Protect features in Settings>Google>Security. This allows Google to periodically scan your phone's apps to look for malware.

    5. Turn off "Unknown Sources" in Settings>Security (or Settings>Apps & Notifications>Special App Access). This prevents any app that wasn't obtained from Google Play Store from being installed (which could include malicious apps that are inadvertently downloaded).
    12-02-2018 02:25 AM
  5. Gary02468's Avatar
    For the most part, it's still quite difficult to get an actual virus on your phone, because malware requires you to manually accept the installation (which is why they try to fool you into thinking you're installing something legitimate). Use common sense:
    I agree. For present-day phones I just accept the built-in security setup. For the Note9, that does include McAfee (I don't recall but I may have tapped OK to enable it at some point when asked). I install firmware updates as soon as available so I don't fall behind on security patches.
    B. Diddy and Beansr519 like this.
    12-02-2018 07:35 AM
  6. Gayle Lynn's Avatar
    Ads as in adware and also phishing are most common and not addressed well if at all by your security suite.

    Filtering ads
    DNS
    VPN

    Paid apps that don't rely on ads and adserver, which are out of the control of the app, Google. Bad actors inject malware ads. Redirected web traffic.

    Android Pie brings more security to the table.

    Too often users are tricked into opening links trusting the email. Spear-phising targeted at people and organizations.

    Routers are also targeted as they have vulnerabilities- could also be your front line of defense used properly.

    Apps siphoning user data are eventually found.

    We are helpless to data mining and large businesses with vulnerabilities and whose data are compromised or hacked, our identity for sale.

    In 30 years I've seen more downside and little upside to security suites. A good password manager though should be on the top of any list of things to use.
    B. Diddy and Gary02468 like this.
    12-02-2018 08:08 AM
  7. methodman89's Avatar
    This is a list of bad apps that made it to the playstore, but shouldn't be used.
    B. Diddy and sweetypie31 like this.
    12-02-2018 08:13 AM
  8. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I've always used Lookout on all my devices. Not only does it have anti-malware and security features, it also backs up your contacts and can track a lost phone. It runs in the background and does not use a lot of battery juice.
    Those secondary features are questionable on their use. Your contacts are already backed up onto the Google servers, and Google also has Find My Device that can track your phone (assuming a thief hasn't disabled it or blocked signal) and it's more universal.
    B. Diddy likes this.
    12-02-2018 08:27 AM
  9. Rukbat's Avatar
    We are helpless to data mining and large businesses with vulnerabilities and whose data are compromised or hacked, our identity for sale.
    One defense against that - and a mistake a lot of people make - is to never use the same password in 2 places, sites and apps both. Use a password app and let it generate long meaningless passwords. 20 characters is considered military grade, but some sites will accept 50 characters. (It costs them the same, since all passwords on a decent site are hashed, and the hash is as many bytes long as it is - if they use an MD5 hash, it's 32 bytes long, whether you use a 6 character password or a 50 character password.)

    If you need the passwords on more than one device, most password apps/programs these days let you keep the password list on their site (like Lastpass) or anywhere you like, like Drive (like KeePass).

    This way, if a business site (like the Starwood breach the other day) is hacked, they get your password to that site and nothing else. (It's amazing how many people still use 'Password' as their password - for everything.)
    12-03-2018 04:06 PM
  10. Gayle Lynn's Avatar
    When you steal a database, you grab the master keys oi f sysadmin and any master keys. I doubt even the best password stops that. Not a reason to not use strong passwords and encrypted keys, but after watching all the holes in n the data security field and lack of funding

    It is a cesspool of weak security. Routers with poor psd and old firmware. WPS itself should be big "X" No.

    I detest how users are lulled into reusing their Facebook or Twitter account for logins, as if those are safe.
    12-03-2018 07:09 PM
  11. Almeuit's Avatar
    When you steal a database, you grab the master keys oi f sysadmin and any master keys. I doubt even the best password stops that. Not a reason to not use strong passwords and encrypted keys, but after watching all the holes in n the data security field and lack of funding

    It is a cesspool of weak security. Routers with poor psd and old firmware. WPS itself should be big "X" No.

    I detest how users are lulled into reusing their Facebook or Twitter account for logins, as if those are safe.
    He didn't say a password stops it. It helps to have a more complex password. In addition if you use a unique password for each site it makes you less vulnerable because if one site does get hacked they only have the password for that site and not other sites you use.
    Beansr519 likes this.
    12-03-2018 07:40 PM
  12. Rico4you's Avatar
    My Android devices are BlackBerry and NO root has ever been successful...so yes secured. No issues.
    bigedschukar likes this.
    12-08-2018 06:05 PM
  13. Gayle Lynn's Avatar
    Malicious sites abuse 11-year-old Firefox bug that Mozilla failed to fix

    Bug dealt with in Chrome and Edge, but still a problem for Firefox users.

    https://www.zdnet.com/article/malici...-failed-to-fix
    12-09-2018 07:21 AM
  14. granblanco's Avatar
    i do internet security for a living. Malwarebytes (do not work for them or a partner of theirs) is a good option with many useful features that are not redundant to core apps. Long, complex passwords make brute force attacks more difficult (take longer to crack, may not be worth it to attacker who is after low hanging fruit). Password managers facilitate unique passwords per site/app reducing collateral damage of breaches. Security apps like Malwarebytes not only scan programs/apps (somewhat redundant if not downloading from unknown sources) but scan websites you hit or links you receive via SMS for malicious content or links to malicious content as well as helping to screen suspicious calls (for those without Pixel).
    12-09-2018 09:30 AM
  15. donm527's Avatar
    If you don’t feel 100% sure on security on Android.. or even 90%... then I feel no harm in adding in apps for peace of mind. For me, from only personal experience and ownerships of phones... I don’t feel any need for extra security measures on iPhones or iPads. Going back to Android with the Note this past year, I feel Androids are more vulnerable and you do read more often of vulnerabilities even with apps being discovered in Googles own Play Store and I have sideloaded apps even from official company websites or tempted to sideload apps like from reading XDA site and even though they sound trustworthy you never know.

    So with that in mind and, even if I chances are I won’t need it, for peace of mind I use a couple of apps I feel comfortable with and don’t think of it anymore. The ones I found I install and pretty much run invisible in the background and in past year don’t feel effect in performance or battery.

    Bitdefender mobile security and Antivirus
    And AdGuard.

    Bitdefender has a yearly subscription but I get more than enough google play money with my google rewards app that it basically free. AdGuard I had a lifetime license for PCs and Android I think on sale cost me $30 one time fee and has been the best purchase made in long time killings ads on my Android and PC.

    For peace of mind without and performance it and actually improvement of usage with AdGuard... definitely worth it.
    12-09-2018 09:30 AM
  16. donm527's Avatar
    As far as passwords mentioned... you can use app like LastPass to generate unique passwords per site or app and maintain. I have that too but I don’t use it as religiously as I should to be extra secure.
    12-09-2018 09:34 AM
  17. cardboard60's Avatar
    i do internet security for a living. Malwarebytes (do not work for them or a partner of theirs) is a good option with many useful features that are not redundant to core apps. Long, complex passwords make brute force attacks more difficult (take longer to crack, may not be worth it to attacker who is after low hanging fruit). Password managers facilitate unique passwords per site/app reducing collateral damage of breaches. Security apps like Malwarebytes not only scan programs/apps (somewhat redundant if not downloading from unknown sources) but scan websites you hit or links you receive via SMS for malicious content or links to malicious content as well as helping to screen suspicious calls (for those without Pixel).
    How does anybody expect people to remember long drawn out passwords
    Especially as many accounts as well have.
    I am continuously asking for my password.
    And when I try to put a new one it.
    It don't want to take it
    Says I don't have enough difference characters.
    Heck sometimes I can't even remember what I put in.
    Yesterday 07:56 AM
  18. Mooncatt's Avatar
    How does anybody expect people to remember long drawn out passwords
    Especially as many accounts as well have.
    I am continuously asking for my password.
    And when I try to put a new one it.
    It don't want to take it
    Says I don't have enough difference characters.
    Heck sometimes I can't even remember what I put in.
    As others mentioned, password managers can help with this. Instead of remembering tons of different passwords, you only have to remember (or keep a secured note of it somewhere) one very strong password, and the manager handles the rest. I elaborated on the topic here:

    https://forums.androidcentral.com/sh...d.php?t=899430
    Yesterday 08:07 AM
  19. Gary02468's Avatar
    How does anybody expect people to remember long drawn out passwords[?]
    You're not supposed to be able to remember them. If you can, they're not secure. You need to use a good password-manager app. Then you only need to remember one secure master password for the app itself.
    Yesterday 08:07 AM
  20. cardboard60's Avatar
    Glad I have the Titan security chip on my phone.
    Yesterday 08:47 AM
  21. Almeuit's Avatar
    How does anybody expect people to remember long drawn out passwords
    Especially as many accounts as well have.
    I am continuously asking for my password.
    And when I try to put a new one it.
    It don't want to take it
    Says I don't have enough difference characters.
    Heck sometimes I can't even remember what I put in.
    That is why password managers exist.
    Yesterday 04:33 PM
  22. svtcobra's Avatar
    Glad I have the Titan security chip on my phone.
    DITTO
    Yesterday 06:01 PM

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