08-18-2021 10:44 AM
38 12
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  1. Rumblee1's Avatar
    Doesn't fast charging degrade your battery quicker?
    07-25-2021 11:37 AM
  2. mustang7757's Avatar
    I haven't noticed anything over the years
    J Dubbs and Laura Knotek like this.
    07-25-2021 04:13 PM
  3. jope28's Avatar
    Well, what's always been said is that fast charging generates more heat and that heat shortens battery life/health.
    07-25-2021 11:35 PM
  4. mustang7757's Avatar
    Well, what's always been said is that fast charging generates more heat and that heat shortens battery life/health.
    It probably would if it wasn't controlled, it's up to certain point it fast charges then it's like a trickle charge after
    07-25-2021 11:41 PM
  5. marzfreerider's Avatar
    There are a lot of different opinions on the topic and both sides have good points. Easiest thing to do is use fast charging when you need to and regular speeds when you don't.
    07-25-2021 11:59 PM
  6. Morty2264's Avatar
    I thought I heard something to that effect, but as another user said, usage cases vary and there are good analogies for both sides. My motto is: charge how you need to, don't let your phone go to 100%, and try not to sweat the charging stuff! If you have device protection or insurance, rest easy!
    Dan_B1979 likes this.
    07-26-2021 06:11 AM
  7. Roadijeff's Avatar
    Doesn't fast charging degrade your battery quicker?
    That has always been my theory, whether it is a cell phone battery or some other rechargeable device. All I know that since the latest July software update I am now getting close to 5 days out of a single charge with low to medium use. I turned off the option for fast charging in my settings and I put my phone on the wireless charging stand when I go to bed on the day I want to recharge it. It's back up to 100% by the next morning. S21U
    07-28-2021 01:48 PM
  8. J Dubbs's Avatar
    Most phones come with fast chargers they are designed to handle... so I highly doubt the fast charging is the problem. All night charging every night, and running your phone down super low IS a battery killer though. I've never had a battery die in a phone, and I keep them for years. I just retired my 2016 pixel a month ago and the battery was still doing it's job. But I never run my phones down low, and I only charge them to full then unplug them for the night.

    My pixels only use a few percent overnight so I wake up with them basically full. But I do understand heavy users (which I'm not) will have different case scenarios so they would have to do things a little differently. Maybe keep it plugged in if you use it in bed then unplug it when you go to sleep. And maybe top it off during the day if possible, or carry a small battery with you to top it off.

    Now if you get a new phone every year, toss all that out the window and do as you please lol.
    Morty2264 and mustang7757 like this.
    07-29-2021 05:55 AM
  9. Morty2264's Avatar
    Most phones come with fast chargers they are designed to handle... so I highly doubt the fast charging is the problem. All night charging every night, and running your phone down super low IS a battery killer though. I've never had a battery die in a phone, and I keep them for years. I just retired my 2016 pixel a month ago and the battery was still doing it's job. But I never run my phones down low, and I only charge them to full then unplug them for the night.

    My pixels only use a few percent overnight so I wake up with them basically full. But I do understand heavy users (which I'm not) will have different case scenarios so they would have to do things a little differently. Maybe keep it plugged in if you use it in bed then unplug it when you go to sleep. And maybe top it off during the day if possible, or carry a small battery with you to top it off.

    Now if you get a new phone every year, toss all that out the window and do as you please lol.
    I agree with you when it comes to not letting the phone sit on the charger every night!
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-29-2021 07:11 AM
  10. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    Nothing wrong with leaving a phone on charge overnight. It's just superstition at this point left over from only partly understood information from two or three decades ago.
    david61983, Roadijeff and 1raygin like this.
    07-30-2021 04:41 AM
  11. rjack22's Avatar
    Nothing wrong with leaving a phone on charge overnight
    Glad to hear this. I have always left my phone on the charger overnight with no adverse effects. My last phone, a S9, lasted 3 years and then the battery was still fine. I just wanted a new phone (smile).
    1raygin likes this.
    07-30-2021 05:34 AM
  12. Morty2264's Avatar
    Nothing wrong with leaving a phone on charge overnight. It's just superstition at this point left over from only partly understood information from two or three decades ago.
    Maybe it's superstition but I still think it's good practice to not leave a device of any sort plugged in for an extended period of time/when you are not there to supervise and monitor for heat/other warning signs.
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-30-2021 06:19 AM
  13. gomezz's Avatar
    I thought the whole point of modern charging is that the circuitry detects when approaching full charge so changes to trickle charge then eventually switches charging off?
    07-30-2021 06:43 AM
  14. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    Maybe it's superstition but I still think it's good practice to not leave a device of any sort plugged in for an extended period of time/when you are not there to supervise and monitor for heat/other warning signs.
    I mean, your fridge spends it's time pressurising (quite possibly highly flammable) gases into liquids with a compressor which gets quite hot and is cooled by being partially submerged in those very same (possibly) flammable liquids... And I'd bet good money you let it run 24/7 without giving it a second thught.

    I'm not here to tell you how to charge your phone, the right answer is always what works best for you. I just don't like FUD over nothing.
    Morty2264 likes this.
    07-30-2021 06:44 AM
  15. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    I thought the whole point of modern charging is that the circuitry detects when approaching full charge so changes to trickle charge then eventually switches charging off?
    That is correct. A lot of people seem to not trust the control circuitry, but if you really mistrust it that much you shouldn't own a phone.
    07-30-2021 06:50 AM
  16. Morty2264's Avatar
    I mean, your fridge spends it's time pressurising (quite possibly highly flammable) gases into liquids with a compressor which gets quite hot and is cooled by being partially submerged in those very same (possibly) flammable liquids... And I'd bet good money you let it run 24/7 without giving it a second thught.

    I'm not here to tell you how to charge your phone, the right answer is always what works best for you. I just don't like FUD over nothing.
    I totally see what you are saying. I'm also not trying to tell you or anyone else what to do with charging! Just sharing my two cents' worth and experiences. I have a bit of a different experience with charging and leaving phones on the charger. In my building, a fire started due to an old charger cable. It wasn't my unit but it was very alarming and so perhaps I'm a bit more squeamish about the charging of devices I *can* control - obviously not fridges, freezers, etc. I wouldn't call it FUD if I legitimately had to evacuate my building with my husband and cat at 5 AM lol.
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-30-2021 06:51 AM
  17. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    I totally see what you are saying. I'm also not trying to tell you or anyone else what to do with charging! Just sharing my two cents' worth and experiences. I have a bit of a different experience with charging and leaving phones on the charger. In my building, a fire started due to an old charger cable. It wasn't my unit but it was very alarming and so perhaps I'm a bit more squeamish about the charging of devices I *can* control - obviously not fridges, freezers, etc. I wouldn't call it FUD if I legitimately had to evacuate my building with my husband and cat at 5 AM lol.
    That's terrible! And had I known I*may*have not said something that could make you paranoid about your fridge lol.

    Unfortunately, people are NOT safe. I do agree that you should unequivocally never use damaged or incompatible electronics.

    As I like to say, anything is a smoke machine if you use it wrongly enough. And you can't engineer around user stupidity.
    Morty2264 likes this.
    07-30-2021 07:34 AM
  18. Morty2264's Avatar
    That's terrible! And had I known I*may*have not said something that could make you paranoid about your fridge lol.

    Unfortunately, people are NOT safe. I do agree that you should unequivocally never use damaged or incompatible electronics.

    As I like to say, anything is a smoke machine if you use it wrongly enough. And you can't engineer around user stupidity.
    LOL no worries at all! I totally agree with you that people are not safe at all! That's one of the many reasons why I want to get out of apartment living. You may be safe but then there's the fool down the hall that decides "hey, let's leave the stove on - oh, well!"

    Also, your whole "anything is a smoke machine if you use it wrongly enough" analogy is SO TRUE!
    07-30-2021 07:42 AM
  19. Mike Dee's Avatar
    I mean, your fridge spends it's time pressurising (quite possibly highly flammable) gases into liquids with a compressor which gets quite hot and is cooled by being partially submerged in those very same (possibly) flammable liquids... And I'd bet good money you let it run 24/7 without giving it a second thught.

    I'm not here to tell you how to charge your phone, the right answer is always what works best for you. I just don't like FUD over nothing.
    Refrigerant is not flammable and it does not cool the compressor. The compressor and condenser are cooled by the condenser fan.
    07-30-2021 09:14 AM
  20. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    Refrigerant is not flammable and it does not cool the compressor. The compressor and condenser are cooled by the condenser fan.
    Depends on the refrigerant used and the model.

    Some refrigerants (especially modern ones) are highly flammable, others are not, hence the use of words like "possibly".

    Obviously you're not aware, but a widely used domestic refrigerant is R290... You may have heard R290 referred to by its common name, "propane".
    07-30-2021 09:29 AM
  21. Roadijeff's Avatar
    Nothing wrong with leaving a phone on charge overnight. It's just superstition at this point left over from only partly understood information from two or three decades ago.
    I totally agree. Once the battery reaches 100%, the charger stops trying to charge it.
    07-30-2021 12:19 PM
  22. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Nothing wrong with leaving a phone on charge overnight. It's just superstition at this point left over from only partly understood information from two or three decades ago.
    There is partly misunderstood information on both sides, like your statement.

    With Li-ion batteries, it's not a threat of overcharging that is the problem (what it sounds like you are referring to), but dwelling at a high charge state. If you charge to full, unplug it, and let it sit on a shelf long term, that elevated charge state is still going to accelerate wear on the battery. Anything over about 75% can be considered elevated.

    I mean, your fridge spends it's time pressurising (quite possibly highly flammable) gases into liquids with a compressor which gets quite hot and is cooled by being partially submerged in those very same (possibly) flammable liquids... And I'd bet good money you let it run 24/7 without giving it a second thught.

    I'm not here to tell you how to charge your phone, the right answer is always what works best for you. I just don't like FUD over nothing.
    If you leave a phone plugged in, it's not likely to catastrophically fail due to the safeguards in place with the circuitry, just how a properly running refrigerator isn't going to go up in flames when left plugged in. What will happen is the battery will wear out faster if kept fully charged (my record was less than 6 months when I kept a phone plugged in at all times), just like how a fridge will wear out sooner if you set the temps at the coldest setting causing it to run more often.
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-30-2021 12:57 PM
  23. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Doesn't fast charging degrade your battery quicker?
    As others said, "it depends." Phones will throttle the charge rates based on temp, charge level, and if you're actively using it. One thing not yet mentioned is how fast is too fast. If we assume all the other boxes are checked to allow the fastest rates, the phone negotiates with the charger on what that is. Assuming the charger is capable of matching or charging faster than the phone is designed for, the phone will limit the charge to the maximum safe level.

    The reason we now see faster charging abilities is largely due to increased battery size. The maximum safe charging rate is dependent on battery size; the larger the battery, the more current it can handle. It wouldn't be safe to charge a 1,000mAh battery at 5A, but a 5,000mAh battery would be fine during the initial fast charge stage as long as it isn't allowed to get hot during use or high ambient temps. The time to full hasn't really changed much over the years.
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-30-2021 01:10 PM
  24. fuzzylumpkin's Avatar
    There is partly misunderstood information on both sides, like your statement.

    With Li-ion batteries, it's not a threat of overcharging that is the problem (what it sounds like you are referring to), but dwelling at a high charge state. If you charge to full, unplug it, and let it sit on a shelf long term, that elevated charge state is still going to accelerate wear on the battery. Anything over about 75% can be considered elevated.



    If you leave a phone plugged in, it's not likely to catastrophically fail due to the safeguards in place with the circuitry, just how a properly running refrigerator isn't going to go up in flames when left plugged in. What will happen is the battery will wear out faster if kept fully charged (my record was less than 6 months when I kept a phone plugged in at all times), just like how a fridge will wear out sooner if you set the temps at the coldest setting causing it to run more often.
    I mean, yeah, there's the "never charge above 80% or drop below 40%" crowd, but that's an entirely different silly argument.

    What I was specifically referring to is the difference between fully charging, than removing it from charge. And fully charging and leaving it overnight. Which is effectively none.

    What you're doing here is a bit of a Straw-man... I'm obviously talking about overnight charging and not leaving a device plugged in for days, weeks or months on end.
    07-30-2021 01:22 PM
  25. Mooncatt's Avatar
    What you're doing here is a bit of a Straw-man... I'm obviously talking about overnight charging and not leaving a device plugged in for days, weeks or months on end.
    What I'm doing is correcting a factually wrong statement on your part, and your misappropriated analogy. You said there is "nothing wrong" with overnight charging, when that isn't exactly the case.
    J Dubbs likes this.
    07-30-2021 01:32 PM
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