06-16-2012 11:44 AM
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  1. zack7687's Avatar
    I'm not a fan of LG and until they prove they will support their products both through updates and if something goes wrong with the phone ill stay away. Not releasing drivers and not updating the phones makes them a no go for me ATM.
    Exact reasons why I have never considered LG a top maker of android devices. I'll stick with my S3
    06-15-2012 05:08 PM
  2. RaiderWill's Avatar
    Sounds Like My "S3 In The Hand G-Note 2 In The Bush Thread...."
    06-15-2012 05:09 PM
  3. soothslyr's Avatar
    lol. this wasn't intended to be, but it may be close to it.

    i agree that LG needs to step their game up, especially with the new wave of devices on the horizon.

    hopefully, they take a lesson from HTC's playbook, and focus on flagship products, instead of playing the field. make it simple, and we will buy :P

    ... oh, and make it powerful too. just in case you didn't know that already lol
    06-16-2012 03:52 AM
  4. crashvoodoo's Avatar
    The whole "there will always be something newer coming soon" argument is valid, but there are cases when I say it holds to less of a degree. An example of when it does not apply is when a phone is coming out with a cortex A9 processor more than a year after A9s were introduced on phones. Yes, clock speeds have been steadily rising that whole time, and benchmarks and performance has been improving, but these have been essentially modifications to the same base. A15 will be a new base and be a leap forward vs. little steps forward. That's why it makes sense when a A9 phone comes out (way after A9s were first released) to want to wait until the A15s hit, so that you can upgrade at a time when a great leap is made vs. upgrading at a time when only little steps are being made.

    Now the GS3 with the S4 is kind of close to a leap, since the S4 is more advanced than cortex A9, but the thing that keeps it still just a little step is the GPU. Adreno 225 (and even the international's Mali) are both undeniably little steps forward vs. leaps. They are effectively mild improvements over 2011 GPUs, vs. Adreno 320 and the upcoming Mali which will be a new gen. The way I see it, I would MUCH rather make the decision to upgrade when a whole new generation of specs comes out than make the decision to upgrade at the end of a specs cycle. For those into cars, here's my analogy: the GS3 (and One X) are kind of like the last model year of a midcycle facelift. Compared to the initial release of the generation, the styling has been mildly updated, the HP and torque have been bumped (but they're still using the same fundamental engine, just tweaked for a bit more performance), some nice new features have been added to the interior, and things like the suspension and brakes have also been tweaked for performance. Still, it would be a bummer to get the last model year just before the next generation comes out, which is more than just an update.

    Ultimately, it depends on where you are coming from, since if you're coming from a really old phone then the GS3 or One X may be a completely new gen to you. But if you're coming from a 2011 phone, you're essentially looking at the last evolution of your generation, which is why some people might want to wait until this fall/winter to see specs that so eclipse their phone as to warrant their designation as a completely new gen. That's where I'm at. Yes, the One X and GS3 are both better than my Sensation, but not "enough" for me. That's of course subjective, and I know the upgrade addicts probably don't agree, but there are also a lot of people like me out there.
    I agree with this. My Nexus S is going on for nearly 2 years old and my next upgrade will be my first multicore phone. I have the option of picking up the GSIII now but as much as I love the device I know that in a few months time Touchwiz will be annoying me and I'll be regretting actually getting it when the next Nexus is released. I like stock android too much.

    I made the same mistake last time when I plumped for the Desire Z, regretted it and dumped it in favour of the Nexus S. I'm holding off this time and seeing what Google I/O or November brings with regards to the Nexus line. I could pick up the GNex but its going on for 7 months old now and I'm not selling my NS just to buy out the remainder of my contract for that. If I'm taking a new contract I want the new stuff.

    Contract is up in November and the spec bump from my NS to whatever is out then should be fairly epic.
    06-16-2012 07:57 AM
  5. monkeyluis's Avatar
    If you let things like that get to you, you'll never buy a phone. There's always something new around the corner. Just get the SIII now and get another phone when the next "latest and greatest" comes out

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Android Central Forums
    Totally agree. Waiting on the next best thing will just keep you from enjoying technology.
    06-16-2012 08:35 AM
  6. soothslyr's Avatar
    i agree that if you wait for the latest and greatest, you'll end up waiting forever, but my point is to not jump on the end of development cycles.

    an example is last year - i bought a laptop with an i7 sandybridge processor.

    i knew that ivybridge wasn't going to be a huge performance leap, so i was okay with taking the plunge when i did.

    here, we all know that the A15 will be a huge leap over the A9 chips. that was my only concern. we're at the end of a development cycle, and the next wave of chips are a huge leap forward. do you take the plunge now, knowing that they're just a couple of months away?

    why did the SIII have to be so darn tempting!! lol
    Danger_Mouse#AC likes this.
    06-16-2012 09:00 AM
  7. LoganK's Avatar
    I agree with this. My Nexus S is going on for nearly 2 years old and my next upgrade will be my first multicore phone. I have the option of picking up the GSIII now but as much as I love the device I know that in a few months time Touchwiz will be annoying me and I'll be regretting actually getting it when the next Nexus is released. I like stock android too much.
    Two years, huh? It must have been a gift from Google since it wasn't really available to the public until, essentially, January of 2011.

    (I'm just joshing you ... you do say your contract is up in November which would somehow put you in the year-and-a-half category.)

    I have essentially the same phone (Samsung Vibrant), and it still runs quite well to this day. Unlike the general consensus, I hate stock Android in 4.0[1]. However, Samsung makes phones that are easy for developers to modify, so I can get stock android, Cyanogen, and a hundred ROMs beyond that. Obviously community support is going to be better on a Nexus device, but it hasn't been bad for me on a carrier-branded device.

    [1] No tap-to-hold to add widgets, horizontally paginated app drawer, no quick settings in the notification menu, no lock screen delay, fewer device configuration options, infinite home screen scrolling ... that's without really looking for differences. Most of my complaints can be addressed by installing a new launcher, but I can't really fault manufacturers for trying to counter some of Google's moves.
    06-16-2012 11:44 AM
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