1. Noldorian's Avatar
    First off, howdy folks. This is my first post. I'm not new to tech but I am an Android noob so please bear with me.

    I've been using a Blackberry for business e-mail & its BB Messenger for years (and I used to really like a hardware keyboard). I've also been using an iPhone (3g & 4) for years for its browsing and various excellent (non-gaming) apps.

    I've finally decided to switch to Android, specifically the Samsung Galaxy 3. Reason being is that I've gotten over my dislike for software keyboards (so having the Blackberry isn't a big plus anymore, plus my Blackberry hardware and software feels like dinosaur - just awful.) Also, I'll be dumping my iPhone 4. It's ok but I'm very, very tired of a small screen as well as Apple preventing me from customizing my phone (iOS jailbreaking is pretty unstable situation) and the hardware has a locked battery plus no way to add in a SD card. I love that I can do that with the S3.

    I know, it's nothing you folks don't know already, I just thought I'd preface my question.

    What I'm worried about with Android, is updating the OS.

    I mean, Blackberry was a p.o.s. in terms of carrier updates so I essentially used the same terrible OS for four years. iPhone, on the other hand, is pretty damn good in the way it handles OS as it comes directly from Apple as well as app updates from the App Store. Basically, I don't want to get into another Blackberry situation (terrible updating situation) with Android.

    I've heard that Android updates might be few and far between. Is this true via Samsung? Android 4 looks and runs great -- I've hacked my wife's HP Touchpad and it runs ICS but it's not very stable and reboots a lot (I'm not sure it's my lack of skills here -- I have a friend in tech who has the same difficult with his Android-hacked Touchpad) -- but I don't want to get into a not-easy hacking situation with my S3. (also i'm not so comfortable with rooting, etc. to risk f'ing up my only phone). I just want to be able to download an OS update and not worry about it.

    Is such a thing possible on my S3? or will it require me to constantly tinker with it to upgrade it, whether for OS upgrades? Is Samsung good about updating or barely-ever?

    I know these are very noob questions, but I warned you.

    Thanks in advance for your help easing my mind because I really, really want to buy the S3.
    06-20-2012 07:15 PM
  2. ThatGuyLurkin's Avatar
    Im pretty sure these Android phones can do anything your iPhone can. Just a different process.

    Software keyboards aren't that bad as well. Once you get use to it, it's really easy.

    Along with ICS, the UI is very simple. More user friendly, especially with what Samsung is doing to it.


    The HP Touchpad might reboot alot because the ICS is unstable, is it a custom rom?


    Doing OS updates on an Android is alot easier than you may think it is as well. It practically does the whole process by itself.

    Sent from my LG-VM670 using Tapatalk 2
    06-20-2012 07:55 PM
  3. nkawal's Avatar
    If you want direct updates then your best bet is to get the galaxy nexus. Its a strict google phone so updates go to it first. Google send its updates to carriers who then customizes it and then pushes to the phones. The later, takes longer because carriers then to sit on it. However if you root, the developers creates ROM's with the latest updates before you are even aware there was an update. Hope this helps.
    06-20-2012 08:01 PM
  4. EvilMonkey's Avatar
    If you want direct updates then your best bet is to get the galaxy nexus. Its a strict google phone so updates go to it first. Google send its updates to carriers who then customizes it and then pushes to the phones. The later, takes longer because carriers then to sit on it. However if you root, the developers creates ROM's with the latest updates before you are even aware there was an update. Hope this helps.
    Well, you miss the step where the manufactures get ahold of it first, then send to the carriers. So Samsung gets the update, modifies their Touchwiz (or HTC modifies Sense or Motorola modifies Blur) then it gets pushed to the carriers, who test it on their networks and get their bloat onto it, who finally pass it onto us, the consumer.

    In all honesty, it's not a great process and why the ICS penetration numbers are kindof pathetic. If you are concerned about updates (and don't want to be hassled), the best bet is probably the Nexus, since it's a "pure" Android phone and gets updates straight from Google.

    That being said, rooting and installing custom ROMS (while daunting when you start reading about it) is not overly hard or even that complicated (although I'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous as hell the first time I did it).

    I'm not saying it's a great option, but you can always go that route to get the latest version of the OS if you desire.
    06-20-2012 09:28 PM
  5. Ry's Avatar
    Until you can't get the essential apps you need for your phone because you're "stuck" on an older OS, the only updates you need to concern yourself with are bug fixes and security patches.


    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Android Central Forums
    06-20-2012 09:32 PM
  6. firetruck41's Avatar
    If you like the SGS3 when you get it, then Jelly Bean, and Key Lime Pie (?) updates are just a bonus if they come. You will probably be able to run almost any app for at least the next two years or more, so any new OS version is just going to be "value added". That's how I look at it anyway. In the meantime there will be periodic, automatic security and bug fix updates from Samsung/carrier.
    06-20-2012 09:46 PM
  7. Ricky Babalu's Avatar
    Well, you miss the step where the manufactures get ahold of it first, then send to the carriers. So Samsung gets the update, modifies their Touchwiz (or HTC modifies Sense or Motorola modifies Blur) then it gets pushed to the carriers, who test it on their networks and get their bloat onto it, who finally pass it onto us, the consumer.

    In all honesty, it's not a great process and why the ICS penetration numbers are kindof pathetic. If you are concerned about updates (and don't want to be hassled), [HL]the best bet is probably the Nexus, since it's a "pure" Android phone and gets updates straight from Google.[/HL]

    That being said, rooting and installing custom ROMS (while daunting when you start reading about it) is not overly hard or even that complicated (although I'd be lying if I said I wasn't nervous as hell the first time I did it).

    I'm not saying it's a great option, but you can always go that route to get the latest version of the OS if you desire.
    Except on Verizon
    06-20-2012 09:58 PM
  8. firetruck41's Avatar
    Except on Verizon
    Except "what" on Verizon?

    Sent from my A500 using Android Central Forums
    06-20-2012 11:07 PM
  9. kjnangre's Avatar
    Except "what" on Verizon?

    Sent from my A500 using Android Central Forums
    Verizon Galaxy Nexus owners have been waiting to get an update to 4.0.4 even though Google released that version many months ago
    06-20-2012 11:52 PM
  10. Ricky Babalu's Avatar
    Except "what" on Verizon?

    Sent from my A500 using Android Central Forums
    Updates do not come directly from Google like they do on a traditional Nexus; They must first be approved and tested by Verizon.
    06-21-2012 12:01 AM
  11. hoovhartid's Avatar

    What I'm worried about with Android, is updating the OS.

    I've hacked my wife's HP Touchpad and it runs ICS but it's not very stable and reboots a lot (I'm not sure it's my lack of skills here -- I have a friend in tech who has the same difficult with his Android-hacked Touchpad) -
    I understand your concern. You don't want a difficult experience with the phone in the future.

    however, I have to ask...why did you update the touchpad? was something missing from the stock OS that she needed?

    I know many people feel like the latest OS is "needed" for some reason...but the truth is, its not like a computer OS which may be susceptible to a hack or attack without the latest update. also, I don't know of many (any) apps that work on ICS that wont work on honeycomb. So looking back, was upgrading to ICS really worth the instability? Was something gained that was worth the resets? ..I don't mean to be rude, and I really hope I'm not coming off that way. I just see this many times and I wonder if it can be avoided. I understand you had no way to know if the ICS would run bad. and ...its not your fault it did...but before I upgrade ANYTHING...i always ask...what am i missing in the update that I don't have now? Then i ask, is having it, worth the risk of messing up my device? Is there a way for me to get it without a major upgrade like a new OS...is there a similar app or theme that will achieve the same effect?

    I know in the apple world, updates are expected to just be done when they are available to the public...but on my ipad2...i don't update until I have seen people talk about it for a bit and see that there are no issues. I just don't want to jump in and take the chance until I am almost certain it won't mess up my device...and even then I look to see what the update is for. If is says some vague description like "security patches and updates"...I've come to believe its REALLY "we found another way to block your root or jailbreak"...unless I do some research and find a known security problem that REALLY was patched.

    anyway...with the amount of people buying this device...the support community will be unrivaled by almost anything out so far. I'm sure the upgrade process will be very easy when the time comes.
    Ricky Babalu likes this.
    06-21-2012 12:05 AM
  12. Ricky Babalu's Avatar
    I understand your concern. You don't want a difficult experience with the phone in the future.

    however, I have to ask...why did you update the touchpad? was something missing from the stock OS that she needed?

    I know many people feel like the latest OS is "needed" for some reason...but the truth is, its not like a computer OS which may be susceptible to a hack or attack without the latest update. also, I don't know of many (any) apps that work on ICS that wont work on honeycomb. So looking back, was upgrading to ICS really worth the instability? Was something gained that was worth the resets? ..I don't mean to be rude, and I really hope I'm not coming off that way. I just see this many times and I wonder if it can be avoided. I understand you had no way to know if the ICS would run bad. and ...its not your fault it did...[HL]but before I upgrade ANYTHING...i always ask...what am i missing in the update that I don't have now? Then i ask, is having it, worth the risk of messing up my device? Is there a way for me to get it without a major upgrade like a new OS...is there a similar app or theme that will achieve the same effect?[/HL]

    I know in the apple world, updates are expected to just be done when they are available to the public...but on my ipad2...[HL]i don't update until I have seen people talk about it for a bit and see that there are no issues. I just don't want to jump in and take the chance until I am almost certain it won't mess up my device...and even then I look to see what the update is for. If is says some vague description like "security patches and updates"...I've come to believe its REALLY "we found another way to block your root or jailbreak".[/HL]..unless I do some research and find a known security problem that REALLY was patched.

    anyway...with the amount of people buying this device...the support community will be unrivaled by almost anything out so far. I'm sure the upgrade process will be very easy when the time comes.
    I live by this, that is why I am still on Froyo on my X without any issues what so ever; unlike the many who updated to Gingerbread.
    06-21-2012 12:14 AM
  13. timbo4656's Avatar
    HP Touch Pad is a non-andorid device. It runs WebOS. he loaded CM9 on it to get ICS/Andoird.

    i suggest you load one of the more recent nightlies, OP. I did and got rid of most my problems with my touchpad (dropped wifi, random reboots).... and head towards the XDA or rootzwiki forums if you want to troubleshoot some more. Re: the timeliness of updates- to give you an idea, ICS was released late last year. the GS2 didn't get it till just a month or two ago
    hoovhartid likes this.
    06-21-2012 12:17 AM
  14. bulvine420's Avatar
    To all those complaining about the Verizon galaxy nexus we have had 4.0.4 for months Verizon just release there version late May. But if you rooted your galaxy nexus (if you have an unrooted galaxy nexus what's the point?) there are over 50 great roms that are ten times better than the Verizon rom. However if you don't want to root get a RAZR maxx it has great camera, screen and battery just not as much support if you want to have fun with your phone and want a great community of divs fur of great people get a Verizon galaxy neus or any galaxy nexus for that matter.

    Sent from my VTAB1008 using Android Central Forums
    06-21-2012 12:31 AM
  15. hoovhartid's Avatar
    HP Touch Pad is a non-andorid device.
    oh!



    mibad
    06-21-2012 12:55 AM
  16. Crispy's Avatar
    On Android, you're at the mercy of the carriers for updates. Carriers don't want to give you updates, because they want you to buy a new phone. Put that together and you can see where it leads.

    The simple fact is unlike Microsoft and Apple, Google don't care about giving their customers updates. They don't even consider Android users customers, from their point of view its a carrier problem.

    This is the worst part about Android, the total lack of care from Google.
    06-21-2012 01:17 AM
  17. firetruck41's Avatar
    Updates do not come directly from Google like they do on a traditional Nexus; They must first be approved and tested by Verizon.
    Your previous post makes sense now that I see it in a browser. When I replied earlier it was from the Android Central app, and it does not show the highlights you marked, which make it clear what you are referring too.
    06-21-2012 02:24 AM
  18. kjnangre's Avatar
    Google don't care about giving their customers updates.
    I don't think this is true. Google has repeatedly expressed frustration at how slow carriers are to roll out updates. For that reason, they've started selling the Nexus directly (bypassing the carriers) and have said they plan to do that with all future Nexus phones as well.
    Noldorian likes this.
    06-21-2012 02:32 AM
  19. ragnarokx's Avatar
    When the Galaxy S1 came out, Moment owners warned that they got very slow updates and that the S1 would as well. When the Galaxy S2 came out, S1 owners warned S2 owners about slow updates. This is especially true with CDMA Samsung phones (GSM versions seem to always get updates faster). As a former S1 owner, I was two major OS versions behind for quite a while. And Sprint's S2 still has no ICS release date in sight.

    Does this mean you shouldn't buy the phone? Of course not. It's an amazing piece of technology. Use if for yourself, and if you like it - buy it. But if you're someone who must have the latest OS, and also someone who will not root or flash ROMs to get it, this could be a deal breaker. If you're more adventurous, you always have custom ROMs and leaks to keep you up to date. I just want to give you the information I wish I was given before buying my S1. Unfortunately, I am one of those people who has to be on the cutting edge of software (hence my move to the Nexus).

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus
    06-21-2012 03:10 AM
  20. Noldorian's Avatar
    Folks, thanks for the information. I really appreciate it.

    Hoovhartid -- you weren't coming across as rude at all. I put ICS on the Touch Pad because I bought it on HP's firesale and used it as a 'test bed'; if I ended up bricking it, it wouldn't have been the end of the world.

    timbo4656 -- Thanks for the advice. I will do that and hopefully the instability issues will clear up some. I'm not expecting a miracle -- it's a non-Android device after all.

    ECripsy -- sorry to hear that. Helpful info.

    Overall, it sounds like security patches, etc. arrive when they need to and are easy enough to apply -- that's basically what I was concerned with.
    06-21-2012 05:11 AM
  21. biff6789's Avatar
    The HP Touchpad is glitchy because it isn't supposed to be running Android in the first place. It's an OS that has been ported to a WebOS device. So don't worry too much about that as it isn't a fair indicator of Android glitchy-ness.

    On the contrary, Forbes found that apps crash less often on Android than they do on iOS these days, so if you've been happy with iOS then you should be happy with Android in this regard:

    Do iOS Apps Crash More Than Android Apps? A Data Dive - Forbes

    And to expand on what some others have been saying, the S3 will have a fantastic dev community thanks to its market penetration and so you can just unlock the bootloader and flash a custom ROM as custom ROMs will always make sure you are running the latest version of Android as quickly as possible. I've got a spare HTC Incredible laying around that was flashed to ICS 4 months ago
    06-21-2012 11:45 AM
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