09-08-2012 03:52 PM
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  1. crackberrytraitor's Avatar
    Actually, those images quite accurately illustrate the difference that I am talking about. The CRT shows you detailed images of what was burned in, quite literally.

    The OLED screen just shows dim/dark spots where the text/icons were. It is not a "burn in" so much as a "burn out."

    And the words image retention mean that the display is retaining the images, not losing the capacity to display new ones. The CRT monitor has a retained image physically burned into a layer on the screen. The OLED display just lacks the brightness in those frequently updated pixel areas. There is no retained image there.

    While an interesting divergence into a different topic, this is also not what I was originally describing seeing.
    Look man, dark splotches in the exact shape of whatever was burned in=image retention. I can literally see which icons are what. As I said, the mechanism may be different, but it still ends up with burn in overlaying whatever you're looking at. Pretty sure most people with burn wouldn't feel at all comforted by knowing that it's not caused by phosphorus.

    But this is off topic since it's not likely what OP was describing.

    Sent from my One X using Android Central Forums
    09-07-2012 06:08 PM
  2. 534n's Avatar
    Look man, dark splotches in the exact shape of whatever was burned in=image retention. I can literally see which icons are what. As I said, the mechanism may be different, but it still ends up with burn in overlaying whatever you're looking at. Pretty sure most people with burn wouldn't feel at all comforted by knowing that it's not caused by phosphorus.

    But this is off topic since it's not likely what OP was describing.

    Sent from my One X using Android Central Forums
    What happens when you put a bright, vivid image on that screen that is "burned in?" You get the proper picture with dull spots. What you are saying is just false. It is not the same mechanism. There is nothing functionally the same about the methods of how they are burned in or the effects that are present. The only time I see an "overlay" is on a blank screen. There is no physical change in the pixel color in a worn OLED display, hence the image is not "burned in" and referring to it that way is incorrect. With old screens, you can see one image on top of the other. With OLED you still see the proper image with dark spots or dull spots. Excluding dead/stuck pixels, there is no "overlay." If you look at phones with pictures or the screens having color on them, while you may see shapes and outlines (one person had his home screen clock on it) they are just dark spots. There is NO color or sharp detail. Another odd source of this phenomena was someone had a fake screen image over their phone in sunlight (display model) and it became burned into the screen by UV rays. That is the only actual "burn in" I could think of for these displays.
    09-07-2012 06:31 PM
  3. crackberrytraitor's Avatar
    What happens when you put a bright, vivid image on that screen that is "burned in?" You get the proper picture with dull spots. What you are saying is just false. It is not the same mechanism. There is nothing functionally the same about the methods of how they are burned in or the effects that are present. The only time I see an "overlay" is on a blank screen. There is no physical change in the pixel color in a worn OLED display, hence the image is not "burned in" and referring to it that way is incorrect. With old screens, you can see one image on top of the other. With OLED you still see the proper image with dark spots or dull spots. Excluding dead/stuck pixels, there is no "overlay." If you look at phones with pictures or the screens having color on them, while you may see shapes and outlines (one person had his home screen clock on it) they are just dark spots. There is NO color or sharp detail. Another odd source of this phenomena was someone had a fake screen image over their phone in sunlight (display model) and it became burned into the screen by UV rays. That is the only actual "burn in" I could think of for these displays.
    Please read my posts. I've said like 3 times now, while the mechanism is different, the result is fairly similar and just as annoying.

    Sent from my One X using Android Central Forums
    09-07-2012 11:02 PM
  4. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    Please read my posts. I've said like 3 times now, while the mechanism is different, the result is fairly similar and just as annoying.

    Sent from my One X using Android Central Forums
    And the point I was trying to make above is that most people will agree with you. While technically it might be accurate, it's close enough to them to be the same problem.


    BUT, I have to agree with everything both of you have said.
    09-08-2012 12:34 AM
  5. 534n's Avatar
    Just for closure on the topic, I never disagreed with you about the annoyance or end result. I just wanted to point out what was really happening and I don't care how people want to refer to it, but some of it is incorrect for anyone that wanted to learn about it. Lots of what the media says is from management and is aimed at the regular consumer, not from an engineering perspective. So in one hand, you're right.

    This debate is a lot like the endless "light bleed" topics with ASUS tablets, some of which are comical, but I won't go any further with that or this.
    09-08-2012 11:08 AM
  6. 534n's Avatar
    omg another intelectual ego rap battle by people i like want me to do the human geek-box
    Lol, that's great
    09-08-2012 03:09 PM
  7. funkylogik's Avatar
    omg another intelectual ego rap battle by people i like want me to do the human geek-box
    crackberrytraitor likes this.
    09-08-2012 03:46 PM
  8. crackberrytraitor's Avatar
    Just for closure on the topic, I never disagreed with you about the annoyance or end result. I just wanted to point out what was really happening and I don't care how people want to refer to it, but some of it is incorrect for anyone that wanted to learn about it. Lots of what the media says is from management and is aimed at the regular consumer, not from an engineering perspective. So in one hand, you're right.

    This debate is a lot like the endless "light bleed" topics with ASUS tablets, some of which are comical, but I won't go any further with that or this.
    The difference being, if you have light bleed you'll know right away and get a replacement. If you have burn in, it generally occurs past the initial warranty period, and you're just screwed. I'd also point out that light bleed is a defect, while burn in is not and can occur on any AMOLED display.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Android Central Forums
    09-08-2012 03:52 PM
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