02-27-2013 06:21 PM
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  1. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    Last I checked, people still had the option of recharging on the go with portable battery packs.

    It's actually relevant. If only a h andful of people actually bought spare batteries, does it make sense for OEMs to support user-removable batteries? Probably not.
    Hmm, I can get two spare batteries for my GS3 for about $10. What's an external battery pack cost? And I can't help but think far more than "a handful" of people buy spare batteries. They're available on Amazon, ebay, and every internet vendor that sells cell phone accessories. Do you really think they'd be so widely available if no one was buying them?

    Of course it's better to have the option to replace the battery with no fuss. But it really isn't a big deal when you think of the options available.

    Again, rechargeable battery packs can easily take the place of user-replaceable batteries.

    And when those batteries get old and start fading out, you're probably out of warranty anyway. It's either time to buy a new phone anyway or crack the phone open and replace it yourself. Looking at teardowns, it looks like it's possible for a lot of phones.
    Oh, my, yes. I'd much rather take apart a phone that wasn't designed for user access than simply pop off the back and swap in a new battery. That's soooo logical. I don't think very many cell phone users would even know where to start taking their phone apart, and the odds of removing a soldered in battery, replacing it, and putting the phone back successfully are slightly between zero and Hell freezing over for most people. Let's be realistic. Rechargable battery packs? At what, 5 times the price and bulk of a simple battery? That's nothing but a work-around to poor design.

    You say "Of course it's better" to have the option, but then proceed to make all kinds of excuses why it's not better. If you personally don't care about a replaceable battery, that's fine by me. But don't pretend the lack of one comes without disadvantages.
    01-02-2013 02:48 PM
  2. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    Exactly lol. But I think Samsung is trying to make their phones too much like the I phone.
    Seriously? The S3 and Note are about as different from the iPhone as you can get.
    01-02-2013 02:51 PM
  3. Suntan's Avatar
    I can't tell you how many times I've been sitting at a restaurant and thought to myself, "Gee, I sure wish I could help that guy over there out with a boost. I mean, I'm going to be sitting here for the next half hour eating my supper, I might as well let that dude sit next to me while his phone charges back up."

    -Suntan
    01-02-2013 02:54 PM
  4. Ry's Avatar
    Hmm, I can get two spare batteries for my GS3 for about $10. What's an external battery pack cost? And I can't help but think far more than "a handful" of people buy spare batteries. They're available on Amazon, ebay, and every internet vendor that sells cell phone accessories. Do you really think they'd be so widely available if no one was buying them?
    How many do spare batteries do you have? Of all the people you know who carry phones that have user-replaceable battery, how many of them actually have a spare battery? Are you assuming that these spare batteries are literally flying off the virtual shelves of Amazon and eBay? I'm simply going off of my own experiences with friends, family, and coworkers. I'd be curious to see if in your experience, if everyone you know who has a phone where they can easily replace the battery actually purchased a spare battery. In mine, a spare is rarely purchased.


    Oh, my, yes. I'd much rather take apart a phone that wasn't designed for user access than simply pop off the back and swap in a new battery. That's soooo logical. I don't think very many cell phone users would even know where to start taking their phone apart, and the odds of removing a soldered in battery, replacing it, and putting the phone back successfully are slightly between zero and Hell freezing over for most people. Let's be realistic. Rechargable battery packs? At what, 5 times the price and bulk of a simple battery? That's nothing but a work-around to poor design.

    You say "Of course it's better" to have the option, but then proceed to make all kinds of excuses why it's not better.
    Excuses? No. They're reasons why it's "not the end of the world" to not have a user replaceable battery. People are acting like just because phones that don't let users replace the battery easily, they can somehow get stuck in a situation where their phone dies and they can't easily recharge it on the go. That's simply not the case no matter how much you want to dismiss potential solutions.

    And again, no one is forcing you to buy a phone that doesn't have a user-replaceable battery. "No phone is perfect, each has its strengths and weaknesses. Do the research and buy the one that best meets your most important needs."
    01-02-2013 02:57 PM
  5. Suntan's Avatar
    Seriously? The S3 and Note are about as different from the iPhone as you can get.
    It is a fair comment to compare the two. Sammy does do some things that mimic Apple. Which I am personally fine with.

    I appreciate the physical home button and it is something I am glad they cribbed from Apple.

    I'm just glad they decided not to copy the overly restrictive nature, fully locked down and simple icon interface and 6-months-behind cellular technology that Apple offered at the time.

    -Suntan
    SenseMonkey likes this.
    01-02-2013 02:58 PM
  6. SenseMonkey's Avatar
    It is a fair comment to compare the two. Sammy does do some things that mimic Apple. Which I am personally fine with.

    I appreciate the physical home button and it is something I am glad they cribbed from Apple.

    I'm just glad they decided not to copy the overly restrictive nature, fully locked down and simple icon interface and 6-months-behind cellular technology that Apple offered at the time.

    -Suntan
    Thank you for that, that's what I was trying to say.

    Sent from my Behemoth of a phone, the Galaxy Note 2
    01-02-2013 03:02 PM
  7. Suntan's Avatar
    How many do spare batteries do you have?
    Personally, I've bought extra batteries for 3 out of the 5 cell phones I've had over the years. Not because I wanted to swap them daily, but because I wanted to continue using the phone past the point that the original batt was still holding a good charge.

    https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp...w=1920&bih=917

    4 million hits... Obviously nobody at all is talking about replaceable batteries.

    -Suntan
    01-02-2013 03:05 PM
  8. Suntan's Avatar
    Thank you for that, that's what I was trying to say.

    Sent from my Behemoth of a phone, the Galaxy Note 2
    Yeah, but it goes both ways. It seems so many phone makers are trying so hard to purposefully stay clear of any little feature that comes even slightly close to the iphone that the design suffers as a result.

    Look at the 4 or 5 phones with leaked pictures in the last couple of months. They all have (what I would consider) too small of a radius on the corners. Making them look like silly rectangles. If I were to put on my conspiracy hat, I would say they are doing it to stay well away from the radius size that Apple has staked a claim onto. That's silly.

    Phone makers should add the best options they think people will like and be done with it. If anything, the continued success of gadgets that aren't Apple should only help to reduce this issue going forward, where good design elements are just used, with less fear of "copying." I mean, how many different ways can you make a flat, thin, rectangular gadget without having some of them look similar in some respects?

    -Suntan
    SenseMonkey likes this.
    01-02-2013 03:12 PM
  9. anonuk's Avatar
    I'm assuming you're being sarcastic. If not, get your eyes checked.

    Sent from my Galaxy S3
    Aye, I own one too ;]
    01-02-2013 03:25 PM
  10. A-android-B's Avatar
    I have to agree with suntan there are only so many ways to put a screen on a rectangle. All (most for you lawyer like technicals out there lol) cars have four wheels, a windshield bumpers and airbags.

    I probably shouldn't have brought this up but one plus that I have experienced from removable batteries is I have saved over ten phones after being subject to water damage-not exaggerated- by taking out the battery right away blowing out with compressed air then left in a bag of rice overnight.

    tea candles are the duct tape of candles
    SenseMonkey likes this.
    01-02-2013 03:40 PM
  11. itssdanny86's Avatar
    The Galaxy S II played a big part in the S III success.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
    01-02-2013 03:46 PM
  12. Ry's Avatar
    Personally, I've bought extra batteries for 3 out of the 5 cell phones I've had over the years. Not because I wanted to swap them daily, but because I wanted to continue using the phone past the point that the original batt was still holding a good charge.

    https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sugexp...w=1920&bih=917

    4 million hits... Obviously nobody at all is talking about replaceable batteries.

    -Suntan
    Not sure where I said "talking" about replaceable batteries but whatever floats your boat.

    Personally, I've bought at least one extra battery for every phone I've owned so far, usually about 9 months in.

    So let's recap -

    IMO, not having a user-replaceable battery shouldn't be a big deal because there are still ways to charge on the go.

    In my own observations, people (regular users, the types who don't go online to have pissing contests on cell phone forums) who have phone where the battery can be replaced don't carry spares around. I however, use a phone that does have a replaceable battery and yes I carry a spare (extended) battery in my work bag.

    Apparently, this is absurd.
    hossman12 likes this.
    01-02-2013 03:57 PM
  13. Ry's Avatar
    And back to the topic -

    In my circles of family and friends, I'm usually the go-to guy when it comes to questions like "what phone should I get?". Something was different in the recent months though.

    Instead of me recommending a phone from a blank slate, this was happening:

    In early 2012, people were asking "should I get a RAZR MAXX?" When the Galaxy S III was released on all carriers, the question turned into "should I get the Galaxy S III?"

    Gone was the "what phone should I get?" question. They were asking me what I knew about those two phones specifically.

    "I heard the RAZR MAXX" has insane battery life, should I get it?"

    "How does that sharing by touching phones thing work on the GS3?"

    It wasn't about the processor. It wasn't about megapixels. It wasn't about storage. It wasn't about whether or not batteries could be replaced. It was about how these phones were being marketed to them.
    01-02-2013 04:04 PM
  14. Ry's Avatar
    Yes, under hearing. Attachment 55490

    Sent from my Behemoth of a phone, the Galaxy Note 2
    Since it's in that menu, to help with "disabled" users - I wouldn't say it's copying. It's probably in similar locations on both devices for good reasons.
    01-02-2013 04:06 PM
  15. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    How many do spare batteries do you have? Of all the people you know who carry phones that have user-replaceable battery, how many of them actually have a spare battery? Are you assuming that these spare batteries are literally flying off the virtual shelves of Amazon and eBay? I'm simply going off of my own experiences with friends, family, and coworkers. I'd be curious to see if in your experience, if everyone you know who has a phone where they can easily replace the battery actually purchased a spare battery. In mine, a spare is rarely purchased.
    A common logical fallacy. "Because in a very small sample population something is true, it must therefore be true of the larger population." Your experience based on even a couple of dozen phone owners can't be extrapolated to 200 million phone owners. It's just not statistically meaningful. Of the 4 members of my family, 3 have extra batteries. Can I therefore say 75% of phone owner buy extra batteries? Of course not. I believe I CAN say that all of these accessory resellers wouldn't carry them if people weren't buying them. Oh, I have two, my oldest son has 1, and my youngest has two. Not that we really need two, but a package of two batteries and a charger is so cheap it made sense to buy that way.


    Excuses? No. They're reasons why it's "not the end of the world" to not have a user replaceable battery. People are acting like just because phones that don't let users replace the battery easily, they can somehow get stuck in a situation where their phone dies and they can't easily recharge it on the go. That's simply not the case no matter how much you want to dismiss potential solutions.
    I already agreed it's not the end of the world. But it's certainly less convenient and more expensive.You even admitted having the option is better than not, but keep trying to prove the opposite.
    01-02-2013 04:23 PM
  16. Ry's Avatar
    A common logical fallacy. "Because in a very small sample population something is true, it must therefore be true of the larger population." Your experience based on even a couple of dozen phone owners can't be extrapolated to 200 million phone owners. It's just not statistically meaningful. Of the 4 members of my family, 3 have extra batteries. Can I therefore say 75% of phone owner buy extra batteries? Of course not. I believe I CAN say that all of these accessory resellers wouldn't carry them if people weren't buying them. Oh, I have two, my oldest son has 1, and my youngest has two. Not that we really need two, but a package of two batteries and a charger is so cheap it made sense to buy that way.
    Not once did I try to say that my experiences were fact for all users. I made it clear that that was simply my observation. Your experiences will differ, which is why I put the question out there.

    I already agreed it's not the end of the world. But it's certainly less convenient and more expensive.You even admitted having the option is better than not, but keep trying to prove the opposite.
    All I said was -

    IMO, not having a user-replaceable battery shouldn't be a big deal because there are still ways to charge on the go.
    But if you want to go in circles, I can go in circles.
    01-02-2013 04:34 PM
  17. NotJustAPhone's Avatar
    But if you want to go in circles, I can go in circles.
    That would make me dizzy.

    Sent from my SGSIII
    Ry, SenseMonkey and Johnly like this.
    01-02-2013 04:51 PM
  18. SenseMonkey's Avatar
    That would make me dizzy.

    Sent from my SGSIII
    +1

    Sent from my Behemoth of a phone, the Galaxy Note 2
    Johnly likes this.
    01-02-2013 05:02 PM
  19. Suntan's Avatar
    But if you want to go in circles, I can go in circles.
    You're the one leading the discussion in circles.

    You want all of us to agree with you that having a replacable battery shouldn't be a big deal. Only problem is, some peope *do* find it a big deal. You don't want to acknowledge this, thus you lead us in circles trying to get us to place your round peg in a square hole.

    Anyway, unless I'm mistaken, nobody in this thread has really made any argument why the non-replaceable battery in the HOX might make it more compelling than the GSIII. So what's the point of beating this dead horse in this thread? Nobody is proclaiming that the GSIII sold millions more than the HOX solely because it has a removable battery. A couple guys commented that they liked having the option to swap batts and then you started going on about how a person "shouldn't" think its important in general.

    You want to stop going in circles? Get back on topic. Why would the non-replaceable battery in the HOX be seen as anything other than a demerit against the GSIII? Start with that question and maybe we can get back in a straight line again.

    -Suntan
    mfriedman79 likes this.
    01-02-2013 10:04 PM
  20. DroidN3WB's Avatar
    Week after I bought my S3 I bought 3 additional batteries + charger for $10 off Ebay without blinking an eye. It's one of the strengths of the S3 - user should be able to access the back of the phone.
    01-02-2013 10:10 PM
  21. Ry's Avatar
    You're the one leading the discussion in circles.

    You want all of us to agree with you that having a replacable battery shouldn't be a big deal. Only problem is, some peope *do* find it a big deal. You don't want to acknowledge this, thus you lead us in circles trying to get us to place your round peg in a square hole.

    Anyway, unless I'm mistaken, nobody in this thread has really made any argument why the non-replaceable battery in the HOX might make it more compelling than the GSIII. So what's the point of beating this dead horse in this thread? Nobody is proclaiming that the GSIII sold millions more than the HOX solely because it has a removable battery. A couple guys commented that they liked having the option to swap batts and then you started going on about how a person "shouldn't" think its important in general.

    You want to stop going in circles? Get back on topic. Why would the non-replaceable battery in the HOX be seen as anything other than a demerit against the GSIII? Start with that question and maybe we can get back in a straight line again.

    -Suntan
    It seems like you're one of those "must have the last word kind of guys" so I'm done.

    And back to the original topic -

    In my circles of family and friends, I'm usually the go-to guy when it comes to questions like "what phone should I get?". Something was different in the recent months though.

    Instead of me recommending a phone from a blank slate, this was happening:

    In early 2012, people were asking "should I get a RAZR MAXX?" When the Galaxy S III was released on all carriers, the question turned into "should I get the Galaxy S III?"

    Gone was the "what phone should I get?" question. They were asking me what I knew about those two phones specifically.

    "I heard the RAZR MAXX" has insane battery life, should I get it?"

    "How does that sharing by touching phones thing work on the GS3?"

    It wasn't about the processor. It wasn't about megapixels. It wasn't about storage. It wasn't about whether or not batteries could be replaced. It was about how these phones were being marketed to them.

    Insane advertising. That's what made the GS3 so popular.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Android Central Forums
    01-03-2013 12:59 AM
  22. Suntan's Avatar
    It seems like you're one of those "must have the last word kind of guys" so I'm done.
    This isn't about having the last word, it's a conversation. In any case, I would have been more than happy to let you have the last word, if you would have actually expressed an opinion about batteries that actually relates to the topic at hand. I said as much above that perhaps there is something I am missing when looking at the battery situation between the HOX and the GSIII. But it seems that when asked to provide any relevant information, you have no response. So be it.

    As for the notion of it being "all" marketing, you're making the illogical assumption that the marketing is actually creating the demand. The marketing is communicating the features to customers in a way that piques their interest. Nothing more. It wasn't the marketing advert that put that big battery in the Maxx, nor was it a marketing sound bite that put NFC support and S Beam into that GSIII that your acquaintances keep asking you about. It was the respective design teams that put features into the phone that people find compelling. The marketing teams just got the word out. Thats their job.

    With that in mind, and your assertion that it was all marketing, what should HTC have marketed better? What features should they have shown off to make the HOX stand out? I guess Im wondering if you have any thoughts that go beyond misplaced anecdotal evidence from your friends and family. Do you?

    -Suntan
    01-03-2013 07:51 AM
  23. sledge007's Avatar
    Week after I bought my S3 I bought 3 additional batteries + charger for $10 off Ebay without blinking an eye. It's one of the strengths of the S3 - user should be able to access the back of the phone.
    I thought about buying extra batteries, but I got a 6600mA (one 2A or two 1A outputs) recharger block for Christmas, 1.5x1.5x3" and 6 ounces, and can charge 2 phones at once, or one tablet. This one wasn't cheap at $100 but I didn't pay for it either My Otterbox Defender is a PITA to keep taking off/putting back on, so this solution works for me.

    As for the marketing debate, for me it was the lawsuit. That really drew my attention to the SGS3...I couldn't have cared less for the ads, although there were some good ads. Apple vs Samsung really sparked my interest to see what was so great about the SGS3. After reading a pretty comprehensive 17 page review, my contract being eligible for upgrade, and a store offering $0 for the phone with a resign back in August, I bit the bullet.
    Ry likes this.
    01-03-2013 08:03 AM
  24. Almeuit's Avatar

    As for the notion of it being "all" marketing, you're making the illogical assumption that the marketing is actually creating the demand. The marketing is communicating the features to customers in a way that piques their interest. Nothing more. It wasn't the marketing advert that put that big battery in the Maxx, nor was it a marketing sound bite that put NFC support and S Beam into that GSIII that your acquaintances keep asking you about. It was the respective design teams that put features into the phone that people find compelling. The marketing teams just got the word out. Thats their job.

    -Suntan
    Quote: "The marketing teams just got the word out. Thats their job."

    Title of thread: "Why did this device get so popular?".


    In my opinion Ry's response is valid. Sure the features of the phone made it popular but advertising is what can make anything popular.. You even just said it yourself right there lol.

    Sure Samsung put in NFC but I can bet most don't use it so.. It wasn't like consumers knew it and ran out to buy the s3 for this... It only got popular with the consumers because of the advertising.

    So.. As the thread says how did it become popular? Good marketing.. They also related to consumers by poking fun at iPhone line waiters and made their phone look so nonchalantly cool .

    Sent from my Sprint S3 using AC forums
    Ry likes this.
    01-03-2013 08:40 AM
  25. The Hustleman's Avatar
    First of all I think the S3 is awesome. i was just wondering how this one device become pretty much the flagship Android phone of the year? (Besides the Nexus 4)
    I look back months ago when i was deciding to buy either the S3 or the HTC One X and was reading reviews on both which made them appear almost equivalent. Needless to say i ended up with the One X and feel like i got the short end of the stick. People never recognize my phone as anything special and i constantly wonder why the One X has been forgotten and is such an underdog while the S3 dominated in popularity? The One X is pretty great, but i think i should have just gotten the S3 at the time.
    Could it be all the advertising? What made this phone so popular? Opinions? Sound off here ! Let me know what you think !

    (P.S I just bought the Note II)

    What makes it so great?
    Voice control, motion control, being able to take screen shots by simply swiping your hand across the screen instead of some weird button combination, picture in picture native to the device, taking pictures by simply saying cheese, shoot, or capture, big screen, light weight, excellent build quality, expandable storage, replaceable batteries (battery dies in the middle of the day? Simply replace it and keep it moving, no need to tether yourself to an outlet), panoramic camera, taking pictures while shooting video, the ability to s beam an entire movie, watching videos while checking email on the pop-up video player, different color choices, ability to completely customize the phone with a new look by simply changing the battery door, great camera, and 2 gigabytes of memory.

    Why is there any question of this being the best android device?

    Why WOULDN'T it become popular?

    Only device better is the note 2 because it does everything and adds more function plus a beefed up processor to go with the 2 gigs of ram.

    sent from the best smart phone (not phablet) on the worst network- the galaxy S III unfortunately on T-Mobile
    01-03-2013 08:57 AM
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