07-10-2013 01:03 PM
150 1234 ...
tools
  1. ledfrog's Avatar
    1st and 3rd seem to be exactly what I said The middle one, you can buy any phone off contract. I think we're agreeing on the reasons
    Yeah you're right!
    07-02-2013 07:15 PM
  2. BOSSY TEXAS CHICK's Avatar
    If you're paying $70/month on AT&T with unlimited data, stay where you are. T-Mobile's current prices are comparable to what you're paying; their network, however, is not up to par. Not yet, anyway.
    but its getting there....

    07-02-2013 09:15 PM
  3. snookasnoo's Avatar
    No..AT&T's Go Plan does too. As well as about 10 or 15 MVNO's.

    Obviously, you're paying $0 extra instead of $449 extra, since you can't compare on-contract prices to unlocked prices. And carriers hide that extra fee in the actual phone plan.

    And which carriers offer cheaper plans for unlocked phones?

    T-Mobile. That is all.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...it?usp=sharing
    So you get the choice of an unusable number of minutes or an unusable amount of data?

    Prepaid Cell Phone Plans, No Annual Contract | Monthly 4G | T-Mobile

    On the left below "pay by the day"

    Sent from my pure Google Nexus 4 using Android Central Forums
    On the T-Mobile cellular network or wi-fi?

    And if you're worried about minutes, VoIP is an option

    Sent from my pure Google Nexus 4 using Android Central Forums
    Hmm, thanks for the clarification. Paying $720 for the plan + $650 for the phone still leads to savings of approx. $20/month compared to what I pay with AT&T, but LTE speed might be worth that.
    Speed and coverage. As bad as AT&T coverage is compared to Verizon it is still much better than T-Mobile.
    kgbkny likes this.
    07-02-2013 11:09 PM
  4. Saturn1217's Avatar
    The Google edition version also has more storage free than the regular version with a GE ROM (or so I have seen on xda). Something to do with storage partitions that are very difficult to change. ~12gb vs 9gb

    In my opinion the other nice thing is not having to deal with weird carrier bloatware/spyware. No carrier IQ, no blocking stock tethering app, no weird wifi behavior (some carriers force you to use wifi whenever you get within range), no waiting x-months to sim unlock a phone you bought at full price.

    I've been spoiled not having to deal with carriers with my GNex and I don't want to have to go read through pages of xda just to figure out how to get back to where I am right now, should I decide to buy a new phone. It would be nice for it to come out of the box that way and if I want to mod later that is fine but I don't want to feel that I HAVE to mod the phone just to use it every day the way that I want to. Personally I will be waiting for the next Nexus (hopefully it will be on par but at a much lower price) but I can see the appeal of the GE devices.
    gnr_2 likes this.
    07-02-2013 11:49 PM
  5. kgbkny's Avatar
    but its getting there....
    I remember you from the Vibrant forums on the T-Mobile site - small world!

    I ended up leaving T-Mobile due to the downstream data speeds dropping to 0.5 Mbps in my supposedly "best possible HSPA+" coverage neighborhood. T-Mobile initially acknowledged that it's an issue with my cell site. A year went by and nothing was done to rectify the problem. Eventually, T-Mobile stopped acknowledging the issue and blamed it on my phones. AT&T is certainly more expensive, but I'm loving my 30 Mbps downstream LTE speeds! The way they treat Android updates, however, leaves a lot to be desired. Hence my reason for getting the Google Edition GS4.
    07-03-2013 08:57 AM
  6. garublador's Avatar
    I think the actual answer to the OP is that the fact that it's a GE alone isn't enough to justify moving from a subsidized phone to an off-contract one. If it already makes sense for you to buy a phone off-contract then the GE version is worth considering.
    07-03-2013 09:11 AM
  7. sooner7's Avatar
    It technically makes sense for anyone to buy off contract, as you pay the same or less, and are ya know, out of contract.
    kgbkny likes this.
    07-03-2013 09:20 AM
  8. gnr_2's Avatar
    You can't use this math to compare the cost of buying a phone outright and one on contract because no matter how you get your phone (retail or subsidized), you still need service to make it work. With that said, you actually lose $450 by not signing a contract. The trade off is that you're not locked in and can leave at any time, BUT how many people switch carriers a lot? I've been with AT&T since 2006 and even longer if you count the Cingular days, so if I were to sign a contract for 2 years, it means nothing to me other than a $450 discount on a phone.

    And don't let T-Mobile fool you with their no contracts because they are actually adding that subsidized cost ($450 in this example) to your monthly bill over the next 2 years. What this means is that after the phone is paid off, your bill will actually get lower! As compared to AT&T, your bill never changes. I've paid the same amount for quite some time now and after my contract was up 3 years ago, it never moved a penny. What this tells me is that all those times I re-upped my AT&T contract, I got a truly discounted phone whereas if you're on T-Mobile you're only getting the discount price in the beginning, but will still have to pay for the full retail of the phone over 2 years. So there actually isn't any discount with T-Mobile at all!

    Maybe that's why they're getting flack for it: T-Mobile "No Contract" Plan Under Fire from Attorney General - Technorati Business
    Well, another way to look at it is that AT&T continues to charge you for the phone whether you get a new phone or not.



    Sent from the Superuser account on my newly flashed Sprint Galaxy Nexus with XenonHD
    21stNow likes this.
    07-03-2013 09:23 AM
  9. Farish's Avatar
    Well, another way to look at it is that AT&T continues to charge you for the phone whether you get a new phone or not.



    Sent from the Superuser account on my newly flashed Sprint Galaxy Nexus with XenonHD
    Here is one other thing people tend not to take into account. Resale price of the phones cover new upgrade prices of the phone. I sold my 4s and it covered my 199 price for my Galaxy S4.

    Minimizing out of pocket costs is always a nice factor to consider in being in a contract.

    That being said, I would like to switch to T-Mobile but I don't think there network will be up to ATT/Verizon level for at least another 2 years when it comes to broad coverage.
    07-03-2013 10:35 AM
  10. The Hustleman's Avatar
    I posted this in the general S4 forum but wanted to post in the dedicated Google Edition forum to possibly get some more input from people. My question is simply this: Why would I spend $649 for the GE version of the phone when I can alternatively buy the AT&T version for $199 and either save $449 by having AT&T pay the rest of the phone price for me (their data plans without subsidization cost the same it seems), or if I don't like TouchWiz or AT&T I can pay a sub-$400 ETF, get the phone unlocked, and move on to any carrier I'd like?

    Is the only advantage of the GE version that one doesn't have to go through the "hassle" of rooting one's phone to convert it to cleaner version of Android? Is that process really that complicated to justify spending hundred of extra dollars?

    Or are there actually carriers that offer cheaper plans for unlocked phones, compared to subsidized phones, so that I can get some of the $449 back?
    I'll never understand spending more money to make my phone less functional

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    07-03-2013 10:36 AM
  11. ledfrog's Avatar
    Well, another way to look at it is that AT&T continues to charge you for the phone whether you get a new phone or not.
    That is very true. I guess I never really worried about it because I just accepted the price as is...at least when compared to most other wireless services. Either way, my company pays my bill so it doesn't really matter!
    gnr_2 likes this.
    07-03-2013 10:46 AM
  12. kgbkny's Avatar
    I'll never understand spending more money to make my phone less functional

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    Functionality is in the eye of the beholder. Personally, I think that stripping away manufacturer overlays and eliminating the carrier from the update process adds to the functionality, not takes away from it.
    ledfrog, nyry and 21stNow like this.
    07-03-2013 11:12 AM
  13. ledfrog's Avatar
    Functionality is in the eye of the beholder. Personally, I think that stripping away manufacturer overlays and eliminating the carrier from the update process adds to the functionality, not takes away from it.
    Agreed! Plus I'm getting the HTC One instead of the S4 and from what I've heard, there are far less features "missing" from the HTC One Google Edition compared to the S4. The S4 will mainly miss a lot of the motion features, which I never found myself using on my SII and S3. I think the only thing I'll personally miss on the HTC One might be the infrared remote, but I think there are apps in the Play store that can bring it back to life.
    nyry and kgbkny like this.
    07-03-2013 12:09 PM
  14. The Hustleman's Avatar
    Functionality is in the eye of the beholder. Personally, I think that stripping away manufacturer overlays and eliminating the carrier from the update process adds to the functionality, not takes away from it.
    Name 3 functions that the Google Edition has that the regular one doesn't.

    Fast updates isn't a function, it's a benefit btw

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    Aquila likes this.
    07-03-2013 12:39 PM
  15. Aquila's Avatar
    Name 3 functions that the Google Edition has that the regular one doesn't.

    Fast updates isn't a function, it's a benefit btw

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    Warranty with vanilla ish ui, photosphere, wallet.

    Transmitted through spacetime.
    kgbkny likes this.
    07-03-2013 12:53 PM
  16. ledfrog's Avatar
    Name 3 functions that the Google Edition has that the regular one doesn't.

    Fast updates isn't a function, it's a benefit btw
    I'll take a stab at this...

    1. Tethering and hotspot features without needing a tethering data plan (mostly beneficial for unlimited data plan owners on AT&T)
    2. Better performance without all the carrier software running (mostly noticed on the S4 according to early reports)
    3. Google Wallet (S4 only) - From what I understand, all carriers have blocked Google Wallet from being used on carrier-branded devices? If that's not true anymore, please correct me.


    By the way, fast updates could be considered a function if the update includes new features. The carriers may end up removing or blocking certain features which would give the Play Editions a leading edge.

    Also, the use of the word functionality doesn't always mean "to have a function". For example, if you compare the camera apps between the original devices and the Google Play Editions, everyone is talking about how the GP editions lose a lot of editing features and camera settings. However, to some people...the loss of confusing settings and insane amount of menu options could be considered better functionality. I think that's what KGBKNY meant when he said, "Functionality is in the eye of the beholder."
    kgbkny likes this.
    07-03-2013 01:00 PM
  17. nyry's Avatar
    Name 3 functions that the Google Edition has that the regular one doesn't.

    Fast updates isn't a function, it's a benefit btw

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    And then you're paying extra for the GE just for dormant hardware like the IR blaster that cant do much without its respective software.

    Honestly if you have a choice between getting a subsidized S4 through your carrier vs. paying $450 out of pocket for an ASOP experience and timely updates, id hands down choose the subsidized phone that will:
    1. Always have the capability to be rooted
    2. Have the capability to use all of its hardware so that option is availible for the ir blaster and a few other things like the IR blaster if you so choose to use it, you will have it.
    3. Price is less steep compared to its GE counterpart
    4. And most importantly, the ability to flash ASOP roms or CM 10.1 if you so choose.

    Now, the GE makes sense like if you are off contract like someone said before in this thread, or you want timely updates straight from google, but It doesn't make sense In my eyes to justify spending hundreds of more dollars for the same phone with less hardware capability, especially when you can put CM 10.1 or a similar ROM on to the subsidized phone.

    Just my two cents :P
    07-03-2013 01:04 PM
  18. kgbkny's Avatar
    I don't care about the TouchWiz features. I am currently using a GS3 (until my GS4GE arrives) and have been using it for the past year. The only TouchWiz feature I've ever used is swiping the edge of my hand across the screen to take a screen shot. This is an action that can be accomplished by pushing the home key and the power button at the same time, much more quickly and efficiently than the gimmicky motion gesture. I prefer the leanness of stock Android to the bloatedness of TouchWiz.

    Name 3 functions that the Google Edition has that the regular one doesn't.

    Fast updates isn't a function, it's a benefit btw

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk 2
    07-03-2013 01:13 PM
  19. 21stNow's Avatar
    Hmm, that's only 100 minutes for voice though...

    But it is definitely an interesting deal. They don't advertise it very well!
    One reason that this is not advertised more is that this plan is in partnership with Wal-mart. You can't walk into a T-Mobile store to get this plan, so it would be confusing to have a lot of ads for it.

    I don't know if you got an answer for what people do with VOIP calling to use more than 100 minutes. There are several options out there; two of the most popular are using Google Voice with GrooVe IP or Talkatone. The free version of GrooVe IP allows you to talk on a Wi-fi network and the paid version allows you to use cellular data for your voice conversations. The minutes will not count against your voice plan this way.
    07-03-2013 01:13 PM
  20. kgbkny's Avatar
    the same phone with less hardware capability
    The hardware is exactly the same on both the carrier versions and Google Editions. If you're referring specifically to the IR blaster, I'm sure that the pertinent APKs can be sideloaded.
    07-03-2013 01:17 PM
  21. ledfrog's Avatar
    paying $450 out of pocket
    It really doesn't matter when you decide to pay the $450 extra...it's going to happen anyway. With AT&T, Verizon and Sprint, you're paying for it by signing up for a 2-year contract. Granted, you will probably stay with your carrier for longer than that, but sometimes signing a new contract means changing terms on your plan, updating pricing, losing features, etc. This is especially annoying for those who still have Verizon unlimited data plans because upgrades will remove this feature from their account. So far, AT&T has allowed their customers to keep unlimited data after upgrading, but who knows for how long.

    If you're on T-Mobile, you will pay that $450 over a period of 2 years with an added fee on your monthly bill. If you jump ship early, they will bill you for the remaining balance.

    So the real argument shouldn't be about the cost. It should be about whether you think the pure Android version is better than the manufacturer version or vice versa. For those of you who want the original HTC One without a contract or carrier bloatware, you can pick up the developer's edition and get all the great HTC software and features.
    07-03-2013 01:34 PM
  22. garublador's Avatar
    It technically makes sense for anyone to buy off contract, as you pay the same or less, and are ya know, out of contract.
    Being out of contract doesn't magically make your bill cheaper. If your monthly bill is the same either way and you're paying $200 instead of $650 then you are paying less by renewing your contract and having your phone subsidized either way. AFAIK, with Sprint, Verizon and AT&T you can't get a cheaper plan by paying full price for the phone. You might be able to get unlimited data by doing that, but if you use less than 2GB per month (on Verizon at least) there isn't a reason to keep that.

    My point is that the GE phone is only worth comparing to a phone bought off contract. If you're in the situation where you have no reason not to sign a contract (usually because the T-Mobile coverage in your area sucks or you get a discount at a different carrier), then it's almost certainly not worth $450 just to get the GE version.
    07-03-2013 02:07 PM
  23. jdbii's Avatar
    Being out of contract doesn't magically make your bill cheaper.
    Am I missing something? I am really confused when I hear people say or post this. I'm under the impression that most of the time it does make your bill cheaper. It is especially true if: 1) you can manage with a prepaid plan; and 2) you are getting a single line for one single phone. I can't think of one scenario where your bill would be the same or cheaper with a postpaid contract option, unless you are on some kind of family plan for multiple lines or other discounted plan. On prepaid, the savings by not paying taxes just by itself makes up a pretty good chunk of the extra $450 out-of-pocket upfront cost.
    07-03-2013 04:27 PM
  24. ledfrog's Avatar
    Am I missing something? I am really confused when I hear people say or post this. I'm under the impression that most of the time it does make your bill cheaper. It is especially true if: 1) you can manage with a prepaid plan; and 2) you are getting a single line for one single phone. I can't think of one scenario where your bill would be the same or cheaper with a postpaid contract option, unless you are on some kind of family plan for multiple lines or other discounted plan. On prepaid, the savings by not paying taxes just by itself makes up a pretty good chunk of the extra $450 out-of-pocket upfront cost.
    Example: I walk into AT&T right now as a brand new customer and sign up for a 2 year contract and buy a new Galaxy S4 for $200. Let's say my bill came out to be $80 per month with the data, talk and texting options all suited to my needs. So with this example, I got a $650 phone for about $200 (taxes not factored in). I saved $450 because AT&T now has me locked in for 2 years. To them, that means they gave me $450 off my phone so they can earn about $2120 (this is $200 + ($80 x 24) months).

    However, when those 2 years are up, my bill remains at $80 per month. So he's right...just because your contract ends, doesn't mean your bill goes down. NOW as far as I understand it with T-Mobile...it might be different. Since they got rid of contracts, they take that same $450 savings and divide it over a 2 year period and add in that amount to your monthly bill, which in this case would be about $18.75 per month. With that said, your bill would actually go down after 2 years if you stayed with the service. If you leave early, they charge you the remaining balance of the subsidized cost ($450) on your last bill.

    Make sense?
    jdbii likes this.
    07-03-2013 04:38 PM
  25. garublador's Avatar
    I can't think of one scenario where your bill would be the same or cheaper with a postpaid contract option, unless you are on some kind of family plan for multiple lines or other discounted plan.
    So you can't think of one scenario, but you can think of several?

    Perhaps this is a better way to put it: whether or not it's a GE phone doesn't matter when you're deciding if you should pay for your phone up front or signing a contract and getting your phone subsidized by your carrier. For that decision, nearly every other factor will be more important than whether or not it's a GE phone. In the US this probably only applies to AT&T.

    Almost everything people are arguing for are just reasons to buy the phone out-right rather than getting it subsidized. It's pretty easy to come up with scenarios where signing the contract is better as illustrated by the person I quoted who came up with multiple scenarios in one sentence. It's also easy to come up with reasons to buy it out-right. It's impossible to apply any of those reasons to someone unless you know their specific situation. Either option could very well be clearly better (despite what the annoying frozen cave man from the commercial says) depending on many factors.
    ledfrog and jdbii like this.
    07-03-2013 05:12 PM
150 1234 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Google Play edition
    By TechyMexican in forum Samsung Galaxy S4 Active
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-03-2013, 03:35 PM
  2. Google Edition Android 4.2.2 ROM
    By CrazyCamel369#AC in forum HTC One Rooting, ROMs & Hacks
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 07-03-2013, 01:12 PM
  3. Is there a way to change how the icons look on the GS4?
    By craigrn16 in forum Samsung Galaxy S4
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-29-2013, 12:37 AM
  4. Google Edition ROM question
    By psufan32 in forum HTC One M7
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-28-2013, 08:05 PM
  5. Beats Audio for Google Edition "?"
    By CS_Shane in forum HTC One Google Edition
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-28-2013, 12:47 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD