1. Roundpotato's Avatar
    I am curious.
    05-02-2013 10:13 PM
  2. jcp007's Avatar
    Once you enable it, you can hover above an email to see a preview

    Sent Via My Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 Tablet
    05-02-2013 10:25 PM
  3. Roundpotato's Avatar
    Once you enable it, you can hover above an email to see a preview

    Sent Via My Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 Tablet
    I mean hardware-wise, how does it work?
    05-02-2013 10:26 PM
  4. Roundpotato's Avatar
    Not too different from how regular capacitive touchscreens work actually.
    Check out 'capacitive sensing' on Wiki if you are interested in the technology.

    Basically instead of the glass being the sole insulator in a capacitive circuit, you have the glass + air together acting as the insulator.


    Sent from my HTC One S using Android Central Forums
    Is this the result of specific hardware Samsung is using, or could this be added through software to other phones currently on the market?
    05-03-2013 01:38 AM
  5. satannik's Avatar
    Is this the result of specific hardware Samsung is using, or could this be added through software to other phones currently on the market?
    Hardware. The device had crazy sensors

    Sent from my rooted Samsung Galaxy S 4
    smooth4lyfe likes this.
    05-03-2013 01:59 AM
  6. Roundpotato's Avatar
    Hardware. The device had crazy sensors

    Sent from my rooted Samsung Galaxy S 4
    That makes my choice between it and the One a lot more difficult, as I think the Air View feature will become standard on devices soon, and will have a lot of applications. Why must the GS4 be so aesthetically disgusting.
    05-03-2013 03:07 AM
  7. satannik's Avatar
    That makes my choice between it and the One a lot more difficult, as I think the Air View feature will become standard on devices soon, and will have a lot of applications. Why must the GS4 be so aesthetically disgusting.
    If you are going to call it greatly disgusting, then it's not for you. Go for the HTC One.
    Keeton likes this.
    05-03-2013 03:14 AM
  8. Roundpotato's Avatar
    If you are going to call it greatly disgusting, then it's not for you. Go for the HTC One. http://thebotnet.com/images/smilies/serious.png
    It might be for me if the non-aesthetic aspects of the hardware/software outweigh its disgusting nature. It has a lot more sensors, the aforementioned Air View, Gorilla Glass 3, a higher clocked Snapdragon 600, DDR3 RAM, a larger screen, multi-window apps, removable battery, SD card slot, etc. It should be no contest really, but the aesthetic valley between the two devices is just so gigantic that it makes it a very difficult decision.
    05-03-2013 04:17 AM
  9. Calidoc's Avatar
    That makes my choice between it and the One a lot more difficult, as I think the Air View feature will become standard on devices soon, and will have a lot of applications. Why must the GS4 be so aesthetically disgusting.
    I love the look and feel of the S4. Even prefer it over my (ex) iphone 5. I was always mindful of the aluminum, feeling I had to be extra careful. Plus it makes the S4 lighter.
    robstunner likes this.
    05-03-2013 07:41 AM
  10. Parafly's Avatar
    I think air view is fairly gimmicky BUT I ski in the winter a lot and for that application it would be great
    05-03-2013 08:10 AM
  11. fatboy97's Avatar
    Check out Samsung's Galaxy S4 tips and tricks page: Galaxy S 4... Air Gestures is #One... they have a Learn More link below every feature.
    05-03-2013 09:52 AM
  12. Xeriffs's Avatar
    It has nothing to do with the screen...there is an infrared senor at the top of the device.
    05-25-2013 09:38 PM
  13. exempli_gratia's Avatar
    It has nothing to do with the screen...there is an infrared senor at the top of the device.
    Isn't the sensor at the top for the hand-waving actions, not the hover over the a screen element. I would think that must be from the screen, since it's so precise (hover over a link anywhere on page to see details, etc).
    05-25-2013 09:55 PM
  14. exempli_gratia's Avatar
    Is the hover gesture using the same sensor/tech as the "High Touch sensitivity" (glove mode)?

    Is there a conflict between the two (e.g. gloved touch being read as a hover)?

    "High Touch sensitivity" is turned off by default, right? Is there a downside? Greater battery use? Or just to minimize false-touches?
    05-25-2013 09:59 PM
  15. Rudolphe's Avatar
    It has nothing to do with the screen...there is an infrared senor at the top of the device.
    That's not correct. AirView works via a Synaptics Technology called ClearPad. It's the same tech that allows you to use the screen without gloves. It can detect your finger from about 2cm away from the screen.

    Do a little research before spreading false information. Thanks.
    06-05-2013 01:38 PM
  16. Robnrbrtsn's Avatar
    If you need to use the touch screen with gloves, that's under the sensitivity settings. Air view isa different set of functions.
    06-06-2013 11:35 AM
  17. Mohamed Maricar's Avatar
    I only thought Apple used the strategy of polishing previously invented features and claiming as innovators. I think Samsung is also following them but instead the onlly difference they come up with the tech within a years time. If you go thru the below link you will see how Sony developed the floating on their Xperia Sola that launched in beginning 2012. Samsung just copied and may be got it on their high end device.

    Sony Xperia sola "floating touch" magic explained
    06-16-2013 04:15 PM
  18. zacsaturday's Avatar
    07-26-2014 09:53 AM
  19. loydtellis's Avatar
    AirView makes use of a technology known as Floating touch.

    There are two types of capacitive sensors used for touch-screens, mutual capacitance and self-capacitance. Mutual capacitance makes multi-touch detection possible. Self-capacitance generates a stronger signal than mutual capacitance, which allows accurate detection of the finger further away from the sensors.

    Floating touch works by combining these two capacitive technologies on the same touch screen, at the same time. Mutual capacitance is used for the normal touch sensing, including multi-touch. By using self-capacitance at the same time, a finger above the surface of the screen can be detected. However, since the floating touch technology depends on self capacitance, it's not possible to perform multi-touch gestures with the fingers hovering above the screen.
    source: Quora
    07-10-2016 02:55 AM

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