08-23-2017 11:22 AM
50 12
tools
  1. dfb8085's Avatar
    I really don't even know why I am reading up on the S4. By the time my upgrade gets here it will be about 1 1/2 years old and something else will be on the way.
    jhill110 likes this.
    05-08-2013 08:26 PM
  2. Jaimeg123prmt's Avatar
    I had my BlackBerry Pearl for almost five years. Then I bought the Evo 4G; then a year later the Epic 4G Touch; then a year later the galaxy s3. Between those phones there was a huge difference. However, between the s3 and s4, there isn't a higher huge difference, I think.
    05-08-2013 11:32 PM
  3. jhill110's Avatar
    It should last forever as long as you take care of it really.
    The good thing about the S4 is that with its removable battery, it can be replaced after the battery starts to get near its life end of about 5000 cycles

    I'm definitely getting the S5 though whenever it comes out
    I've been with Sprint for 9 years and I'm on my 5th phone and have never had one fail. I've only replaced 1... Lost and then later found.
    The Phones should last at least 2 years (IMO).

    I've been waiting for the S4 32gb to hit the streets so I could spend entirely 2 much for one. But... I'm thinking June 2014 when my next upgrade comes up I'll get the S5. My S3 has been a great phone and I'm sure it'll still be going strong in a year.
    I don't really suffer from gotta have it-itis. Afterall, at my age, a year goes by pretty fast.

    Sent From The Galaxy VIA Subspace
    05-09-2013 12:00 AM
  4. bembol's Avatar
    I agree at least 5 years.

    Update Cycle? It's getting shorter down to 4-6 months. I can't remember the last time I kept one for more than a year.
    05-09-2013 12:13 AM
  5. Smartext's Avatar
    We all know that products that were made in the last century are mostly build to last. That is not what we have today. Smartphones technology brings big news to the market every 2-3 years, therefore, they will make sure that you will want to replace your smartphone - every 2-3 years. After those 3 years, which is the average time of an ( Y generation ) individual to upgrade their smartphones, they will buy it back from you ( not directly ) and sell it to the third world countries. ( in 3 years, most of africa will have the proper Infrastructure to handle S4 technology) That how it works, no matter what we want or expect.
    05-09-2013 07:29 AM
  6. kilofoxtrot's Avatar
    How often do you (or plan to) buy a new phone? every OTHER new product cycle?
    Before I can answer, what time is it?
    05-09-2013 08:25 AM
  7. jensigner's Avatar
    Thanks for all the really good comments. So assuming there aren't any REALLY discontinuous/revolutionary features in a new phone, I'm thinking 3 years is my phone refresh cycle (which is in sync with my carrier contract). Longevity wise, based on some comments above, I'd say that at LEAST 6 years is a realistic expectation assuming proper care, so that selling it after 2 or 3 years is a good selling proposition.
    05-09-2013 09:38 AM
  8. paintdrinkingpete's Avatar
    The difference between a smart phone and other electronics is that these devices are used constantly and carried with us everywhere. I can't believe that folks actually expect them to last more than 2 years to be honest. Even if the technology wasn't evolving as fast as it is, these devices take on a lot of wear and tear. I guess a lot of it depends on how much you use it and what you use it for...but for me I actually expect to upgrade my phone every 12-18 months.

    5 or 6 years?!? When you think about the fact that the original Motorola Droid (Milestone) was released in October of 2009 (about 3 and half years ago), and that it came with 256 MB RAM and 512 MB internal app storage, and it's already well past obsolete. Even if you had kept it in pristine condition, it would be 3 or 4 OS updates behind and incompatible with many of the apps in the Play store, even if you had enough free storage to load them.
    05-09-2013 10:46 AM
  9. decepticlone's Avatar
    5 or 6 years?!? When you think about the fact that the original Motorola Droid (Milestone) was released in October of 2009 (about 3 and half years ago), and that it came with 256 MB RAM and 512 MB internal app storage, and it's already well past obsolete. Even if you had kept it in pristine condition, it would be 3 or 4 OS updates behind and incompatible with many of the apps in the Play store, even if you had enough free storage to load them.
    You can say the same about cars. Personally, I prefer to own my car. I've had it for almost 9 years and don't plan on getting another. It still looks fairly new because I take care of it. Just bought my wife a new vehicle and we will keep it until it peters out. Some like to pour money into new cars every 2 years, others like to build retirement accounts with that otherwise wasted money. Yearly updates for cars, phones, expensive cable TV plans, etc., add up drastically.
    05-09-2013 11:00 AM
  10. dlinares90's Avatar
    It should last forever as long as you take care of it really
    I certainly agree that if you take care of your device it should last a long time, but every processor will fail eventually.
    05-09-2013 11:21 AM
  11. paintdrinkingpete's Avatar
    You can say the same about cars. Personally, I prefer to own my car. I've had it for almost 9 years and don't plan on getting another. It still looks fairly new because I take care of it. Just bought my wife a new vehicle and we will keep it until it peters out. Some like to pour money into new cars every 2 years, others like to build retirement accounts with that otherwise wasted money. Yearly updates for cars, phones, expensive cable TV plans, etc., add up drastically.
    But it's not the same as cars. I recently bought a new car, trading in one that was 11 years old, so I get that, but mobile phone technology is moving exponentially faster than new car technology is. Though it may not have some of the newer features, a car is not going to be obsolete after a few years. My only point was that matter how much care you take with your device, the technology itself will be near obsolete after 3 years with a smart phone. I mean the original Droid is practically a Model T if you equated today's Android phones to current model vehicles....at least in my opinion. And like a Model T, if kept in good shape, it may be a collector's item, but you couldn't exactly take one out on the Interstate.
    05-09-2013 11:52 AM
  12. MikeDubC's Avatar
    I update every 3-4 months...I am not normal though
    05-09-2013 11:56 AM
  13. decepticlone's Avatar
    But it's not the same as cars. I recently bought a new car, trading in one that was 11 years old, so I get that, but mobile phone technology is moving exponentially faster than new car technology is. Though it may not have some of the newer features, a car is not going to be obsolete after a few years. My only point was that matter how much care you take with your device, the technology itself will be near obsolete after 3 years with a smart phone. I mean the original Droid is practically a Model T if you equated today's Android phones to current model vehicles....at least in my opinion. And like a Model T, if kept in good shape, it may be a collector's item, but you couldn't exactly take one out on the Interstate.
    I agree, but the logic is based upon carriers' locked down bootloaders and limited access to Android OS versions. If AT&T would allow consumers to update their phones to the latest OS, they wouldn't sell as many every 12 months. The GS4 could potentially last the consumer 5 years or more if they could update to the latest OS. How it stands now, the carriers (most of them) require a phone upgrade to get the latest OS. So, the actual hardware is far from obsolete, rather the carriers use planned obsolescence via preventing OS updates. I work in the computer hardware and software industry and phone hardware is not obsolete until it either doesn't have the storage capacity to hold the latest OS or its processor or RAM begin to degrade. Additionally, I have a Motorola Atrix from 2011 which was dropped in water. We are still using it to test android app compatability.
    05-09-2013 12:17 PM
  14. taynxtlvl's Avatar
    I update every 3-4 months...I am not normal though
    WoW! As much work as it is to set up all new twitter, FB, Tumblr, Foursquare, games etc etc, port contacts and everything 3-4 months is wild, that just seems tiring. I think every 2 years give or take a month on either side is reasonable and entirely in line with most peoples contracts. My last phone my lovely EVO 3D was right on time and concidentally (Or not so coincidentally) I was eligable for upgrading the first of April. so 22 months. And the was still performing flawlessly especially after the software upgrade last summer.
    05-09-2013 12:35 PM
  15. jensigner's Avatar
    It seems to me that we are pretty close to USEFUL features-saturation in smartphones so why bother upgrading so quickly? Whatever happened to wants vs needs? Of course if you have tons of kids, as brilliantly pointed out above, you have arguable justification for refreshing your phone every few months ... hmmmm :-)
    05-09-2013 01:00 PM
  16. ibcop's Avatar
    I usually trade out devices when something new comes out - usually about every 6 months or so.
    05-09-2013 01:06 PM
  17. paintdrinkingpete's Avatar
    I agree, but the logic is based upon carriers' locked down bootloaders and limited access to Android OS versions. If AT&T would allow consumers to update their phones to the latest OS, they wouldn't sell as many every 12 months. The GS4 could potentially last the consumer 5 years or more if they could update to the latest OS. How it stands now, the carriers (most of them) require a phone upgrade to get the latest OS. So, the actual hardware is far from obsolete, rather the carriers use planned obsolescence via preventing OS updates. I work in the computer hardware and software industry and phone hardware is not obsolete until it either doesn't have the storage capacity to hold the latest OS or its processor or RAM begin to degrade. Additionally, I have a Motorola Atrix from 2011 which was dropped in water. We are still using it to test android app compatability.
    We can just agree to disagree on this one. I used the Motorola Droid (Milestone) as an example because it is only about 3 1/2 years old, and even if it had a large enough hard drive, I don't think it could run current versions of Android. Is the pace of technology now such that the GS4 may still be able to run whatever version of Android is around in 4 years? Maybe, maybe not.

    WoW! As much work as it is to set up all new twitter, FB, Tumblr, Foursquare, games etc etc, port contacts and everything 3-4 months is wild, that just seems tiring. I think every 2 years give or take a month on either side is reasonable and entirely in line with most peoples contracts. My last phone my lovely EVO 3D was right on time and concidentally (Or not so coincidentally) I was eligable for upgrading the first of April. so 22 months. And the was still performing flawlessly especially after the software upgrade last summer.
    3 to 4 months is nothing, considering those of us that root and install ROMs have to go through this process each time. Once you've done it enough, you get very familiar with how to backup and restore, and which settings need to be fixed, etc. I can usually go from a fully reset phone to how I want it setup in about 30-40 minutes...depending on how long it takes apps to download.
    05-09-2013 01:10 PM
  18. MikeDubC's Avatar
    WoW! As much work as it is to set up all new twitter, FB, Tumblr, Foursquare, games etc etc, port contacts and everything 3-4 months is wild, that just seems tiring. I think every 2 years give or take a month on either side is reasonable and entirely in line with most peoples contracts. My last phone my lovely EVO 3D was right on time and concidentally (Or not so coincidentally) I was eligable for upgrading the first of April. so 22 months. And the was still performing flawlessly especially after the software upgrade last summer.
    I have everything backed up so it is very easy actually. I can get up an running in under an hour.
    05-09-2013 04:29 PM
  19. Reformed IOS User's Avatar
    I just came from a iPhone 3GS - only got a new phone because I broke it trying to change the battery
    05-09-2013 04:35 PM
  20. americasteam's Avatar
    About every 3 months for me. I have issues. :O(

    Posted via Android Central App
    05-09-2013 11:22 PM
  21. vasekvi's Avatar
    About every 3 months for me. I have issues. :O(

    Posted via Android Central App
    I'd go broke.

    Sent from my AT&T Samsung Galaxy S4 using Tapatalk 2
    05-10-2013 12:24 AM
  22. Ansh Narula1's Avatar
    6 Months! I upgrade every 6 months. Can't stand old tech....My kids love me.
    Wait till they grow up and ask you where all the money went? Buy some stocks for them every once in a while they'll love you till you live & beyond.
    09-13-2013 01:11 PM
  23. Jordan Samuel's Avatar
    I've only recently reboxed my Galaxy S (1!) and I bought that when it came out. There's not a scratch on it as I had a screen protector and a nice silicone case to protect it throughout all those years, Back in its original box, with original non depleted battery like brand new. Waiting until one day it might be an antique . It was a great phone, but now I've upgraded that to an even better one. the S5, Hopefully that will last as long, and even more so because of all the nice new features and the power of it is just wow!

    Over and out.
    10-24-2014 09:17 AM
  24. MarcoDelgallego's Avatar
    I've had the S2 for 5 years and it still works great, my only 2 complaints are battery life and app storage. Since apps are much bigger than they used to be I can only have like 4 apps, like Youtube, Instagram, Whatsapp, and EasyTaxi. I guess bigger apps also translates to decreased battery life, I'm not sure if it was the same when I first got it. I had to replace it a while ago because it was lasting less than 3 hours. The new one gets down to 10% in like 8 hours with light usage.

    So yeah, this should give you a clue about how long your phone should last, I think an S4 should definitely last a lot longer because app storage is probably much bigger as well as the battery. You will probably have to replace the battery soon though.
    03-12-2017 09:40 AM
  25. Gerald Feather's Avatar
    Hi!
    I realize it's been about 5 years since the original post, but in case people are still wondering how these devices held up, I have a Samsung Galaxy note 2 and note 3. The note 3 gets the most usage. I am typing this post on it now. It's 5 years old approximately and still working pretty good. I do notice the battery doesn't last as long as it once did. And because I have never done a factory reset, (I know I should but can't bring myself to backup all my texts etc. I havent) it is quite a bit slower... but that is my fault. The note 2, which isn't bogged down with excessive apps is quite fast and is 6 years old. I have dropped this phone more times than I care to admit, still working fine.
    08-23-2017 11:22 AM
50 12

Similar Threads

  1. How long do you think this phone will be up to date?
    By RavenSword in forum HTC One M7
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 04-28-2013, 01:01 PM
  2. How long will you wait for 2.2?
    By MakaiOokami in forum AT&T Captivate
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 12-28-2010, 01:22 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-11-2010, 08:15 PM
  4. How long will the BOGO on the Fascinate last?
    By joebob2000 in forum Verizon Fascinate
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-18-2010, 01:24 PM
  5. How long will the Evo be out of stock after release?
    By Jerzey McNasty in forum HTC EVO 4G
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-11-2010, 09:38 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD