1. CSI Guy's Avatar
    Google admits to reading our GMail, what do most of you use and what do you think? I use GMail and don't really know what to think about this. It is not that I have anything to hide but it is just
    the principal of the thing. Do many of you use Yahoo or some other service. Do these other services read our mail also? Should this be anything to worry about as there are millions of email
    sent each day thru their servers. I don't think that they single our individuals, not enough manpower to read all of the love letters each day. lol
    08-14-2013 09:05 PM
  2. Aquila's Avatar
    Yeah, if you read the full context of the story they actually are not doing anything other than what they've been doing the whole time, which is using automated programs to find patterns to facilitate advertisement relevance. It's been crystal clear both how and what they were doing for many years. The only update to the story this time is that they cited an argument from another case that indicated that correspondence sent to a third party doesn't have an absolute concept of privacy. That quote was then misquoted by attributing it to Google and being truncated: they ran with only part of the quote and none of the context.

    The real story here is that people don't seen to understand the difference between data mining and privacy breaching snooping.

    That and Google wasn't commenting on their own subscribers, who all agreed to ad content provided at no monetary cost in exchange for automated data mining of their content and behavioral profile. This is about customers of other providers sending e-mails to Google. Obviously the inverse applies... if I send an e-mail from G-Mail to someone at mobilenations.com, we should both expect the TOS to apply both ways in that entire communication.
    08-14-2013 09:10 PM
  3. yankeesusa's Avatar
    Microsoft doesn't do it. But Yahoo just started doing it this year. They sent out policy changes this year. There are more options though. It's a matter of searching. It's all about choosing security over convenience.

    Sent from the Great Galaxy Note 2 using Tapatalk 2
    08-14-2013 09:15 PM
  4. CSI Guy's Avatar
    Yea, I really don't care, If I had something to hide I might but I don't. Oh well Big Brother is alive and well.
    08-14-2013 09:20 PM
  5. efyoiphone's Avatar
    Idk why people get all bent out of shape over this. Did they really think Google shows them an ad in their GMail for the car they searched for yesterday because they just magically 'know'?

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
    Shon123 likes this.
    08-14-2013 09:50 PM
  6. Aquila's Avatar
    Google Now tells you when your flight times are, whether the flight is delayed, etc. It shows you shipping progress on FedEx and USPS and UPS tracking information that's e-mailed to you. It obviously is taking this information from confirmation e-mails.
    08-14-2013 09:54 PM
  7. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    Relevant, from Internet Policy Analyst, and founder of the Global Coalition for Transparent Internet Performance, Lauren Weinstein:

    False Attack on Google Highlights the Web's "Idi0t Echo Chamber"
    efyoiphone, neiljay6 and Aquila like this.
    08-15-2013 12:33 AM
  8. Aquila's Avatar
    Relevant, from Internet Policy Analyst, and founder of the Global Coalition for Transparent Internet Performance, Lauren Weinstein:

    False Attack on Google Highlights the Web's "Idi0t Echo Chamber"
    She's right. We're trading integrity for "now, now, now"... and it's sad, because doing it honestly would only take slightly longer and one would think that developing a reputation for ethical reporting would generate more clicks long term, even if at the expense of losing some ground initially. Maybe that hurdle is too hard to pass now, I don't know but the gravitation to fear mongering is definitely a two way street. If the content providers won't put the brakes on and ignore non-stories, report honestly, fairly and promote informational growth amongst their potential subscribers, then it's up to the readers to lash back a little rather than buying into the frenzy.
    efyoiphone likes this.
    08-15-2013 12:42 AM
  9. efyoiphone's Avatar
    Relevant, from Internet Policy Analyst, and founder of the Global Coalition for Transparent Internet Performance, Lauren Weinstein:

    False Attack on Google Highlights the Web's "Idi0t Echo Chamber"
    She put it in a nutshell. Its to the point that I disregard all 'Breaking News' reports. Even the mainstream news services are so much in a rush to be the first with the big scoop that they deliver rumors to the public then retract later. I've realized if I wait to read the update to the story the next day I'll get more of the truth.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
    Aquila and doorules like this.
    08-15-2013 01:16 AM
  10. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    She's right. We're trading integrity for "now, now, now"... and it's sad, because doing it honestly would only take slightly longer and one would think that developing a reputation for ethical reporting would generate more clicks long term, even if at the expense of losing some ground initially. Maybe that hurdle is too hard to pass now, I don't know but the gravitation to fear mongering is definitely a two way street. If the content providers won't put the brakes on and ignore non-stories, report honestly, fairly and promote informational growth amongst their potential subscribers, then it's up to the readers to lash back a little rather than buying into the frenzy.
    She put it in a nutshell. Its to the point that I disregard all 'Breaking News' reports. Even the mainstream news services are so much in a rush to be the first with the big scoop that they deliver rumors to the public then retract later. I've realized if I wait to read the update to the story the next day I'll get more of the truth.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 4
    I'll be honest sometimes not writing something until you know whats going on is difficult. We try to do that for every post we put on Android Central, and think for the most part we do it well. It's frustrating seeing everyone talking about OMG QUALCOMM BROKE ALL THE NEXUS 7 and not saying anything, but a little investigation and talking to the right people saved us from jumping on that train and having to back-pedal. I'm glad Phil trained us all that way.

    /hijack over. Sorry OP.
    Aquila, gabbott and efyoiphone like this.
    08-15-2013 01:24 AM
  11. Almeuit's Avatar
    I am one of those people that simply say.... If you thought companies and the government weren't watching certain things (regardless of if it's right or not)... You need to open your eyes more. It was normal for snooping and things like that in the past.. Why not do it when it's so easily accessed all online?

    I have nothing to hide and also knew Gmail was doing that.. As someone else said how did people think Google knew what ads to throw in their face?

    Sent from my T-Mobile HTC One using AC Forums.
    08-15-2013 07:05 AM
  12. antman451's Avatar
    I always assume Google can see everything I do...but they provide a benefit that helps streamline my life, so I'm ok with it.

    I always assume the gov can see everything I do...but I'm still waiting on the benefit there...

    Sent via F-22 Raptor
    08-15-2013 07:15 AM
  13. paintdrinkingpete's Avatar
    I am one of those people that simply say.... If you thought companies and the government weren't watching certain things (regardless of if it's right or not)... You need to open your eyes more. It was normal for snooping and things like that in the past.. Why not do it when it's so easily accessed all online?

    I have nothing to hide and also knew Gmail was doing that.. As someone else said how did people think Google knew what ads to throw in their face?

    Sent from my T-Mobile HTC One using AC Forums.
    I always assume Google can see everything I do...but they provide a benefit that helps streamline my life, so I'm ok with it.

    I always assume the gov can see everything I do...but I'm still waiting on the benefit there...

    Sent via F-22 Raptor
    It's a free service and the terms are all laid out in the privacy policy that no one actually reads.

    No one should expect 100% privacy when sending any data online unless they've taken the necessary steps to encrypt it themselves.

    If you want completely private email, here's how to do it:
    1. Build your own email server. You'll need to get the appropriate DNS and MX records setup as well, but that doesn't cost *too* much...
    2. Get an email encryption cert, preferably from a commercial vendor with trusted roots, but I supposed a self-signed cert could work with a little extra setup
    3. Make sure you have an email client that supports encryption
    4. Get all of your friends/family/contacts to perform steps 1, 2, and 3 (this is obviously the easy step)
    5. Exchange public keys with your contacts so that you can facilitate the 2-way encryption process
    6. Send all email using the appropriate certificates to encrypt messages

    *Before anyone pokes holes at the procedure above, keep in mind it's meant as a joke...
    08-15-2013 09:20 AM
  14. asdfasdfgasdfadfs's Avatar
    It's a free service and the terms are all laid out in the privacy policy that no one actually reads.

    No one should expect 100% privacy when sending any data online unless they've taken the necessary steps to encrypt it themselves.

    If you want completely private email, here's how to do it:
    1. Build your own email server. You'll need to get the appropriate DNS and MX records setup as well, but that doesn't cost *too* much...
    2. Get an email encryption cert, preferably from a commercial vendor with trusted roots, but I supposed a self-signed cert could work with a little extra setup
    3. Make sure you have an email client that supports encryption
    4. Get all of your friends/family/contacts to perform steps 1, 2, and 3 (this is obviously the easy step)
    5. Exchange public keys with your contacts so that you can facilitate the 2-way encryption process
    6. Send all email using the appropriate certificates to encrypt messages

    *Before anyone pokes holes at the procedure above, keep in mind it's meant as a joke...
    one more step to add #7. Get familiar with federal prison life, for when big brother asks you to release the e-mails to them, and you refuse.
    08-15-2013 12:38 PM

Similar Threads

  1. Email- (hotmail) just keeps loading and wont send or recieve emails
    By monstercookie in forum Samsung Galaxy S4
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-27-2013, 05:58 PM
  2. What is your level of satisfaction with the Google Edition S4?
    By planoman in forum Samsung Galaxy S4 Google Edition
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-15-2013, 01:43 PM
  3. Outlook.com Exchange Calendar sync to S Planner
    By rileyjsg in forum Samsung Galaxy S4
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-14-2013, 10:14 PM
  4. Question on SoftKeyz and Like
    By harryhoudini66 in forum Google Nexus 7 (2013) Rooting, ROMs, & Hacks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-14-2013, 08:28 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-14-2013, 06:09 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD