04-04-2016 04:53 PM
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  1. ilordvader's Avatar
    I am sure more that 60% will need a Power Bank for there phones

    After you get your GS6, Please do mention which Power Bank you got
    & how long does it take you to charge the phone fully drained

    hoping to get one that charges the phone within 2hrs
    MLazarusM2 and bcbbanga4l like this.
    03-08-2015 02:37 PM
  2. Rukbat's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.)

    2) As long as the source of power - wall, power bank, tamed lightning - can supply as much current as the phone draws, it charges in the same amount of time. You don't push more current into the phone by using a larger power bank - electricity doesn't work that way. (At least it didn't back when I got my electrical engineering degree, and I haven't read about anyone discovering a new kind of electricity.) The phone draws what it's designed to draw. Put it on a 500,000mAh power bank and it'll charge just as fast as from a 5,000mAh power bank. The larger the power bank capacity, the more times you can charge the phone before having to charge the power bank (which you also shouldn't drop below 40% of its capacity), but the larger it is, the longer it usually takes to charge. (The ones with built-in chargers that are designed for a 1C charge, will all recharge in the same amount of time, regardless of their capacity - about 60 minutes. But if you're recharging a 10,000mAh power bank with a 2 Amp charger, it's going to take a minimum of about 4.5 hours if you charge it from 40%. A 10 Amp battery, with a 75% charging efficiency, needing a 6 Amp-hour charge, being charged at a 2 Amp rate equals 4.5 hours. 3rd grade arithmetic. Or do they wait until 4th grade to teach division?)

    If the phone charges in 2 hours, the power bank will charge it in 2 hours. If the phone charges in 3 hours, the only way to put enough power into the phone in 2 hours would be to raise the voltage of the charger. But then you don't have an S6, you have a burned out phone. Again, Electricity 101. The power bank can't change the effective resistance of the phone, and that's what determines how much current it draws (which equates to how fast it charges - assuming that the phone is off; if it's on, running enough stuff [like a really weak phone signal and the screen turned up all the way] so it's using 1000mA, and it can only draw 1200mA, it's charging at a 200mA rate [0.2 Amps]) - and no power bank in the world is going to change that. (My phone charges just as fast from the 2 Amp OEM wall charger as it does from my 30 Amp bench supply. It draws 1200mA in either case. That's how it's designed. I could put it on a 500 Amp supply and it would still take the same time.)

    Your house is a 200 Amp supply, but a 100 Watt light bulb still draws a little under 1 Amp. Connect it to a 5,000 Amp supply and it'll draw the same current. Put it on a 220 Volt supply and it'll draw 2 Amps? No, it'll act like a flash bulb. POP! (You'll actually hear that.) Then it'll be a burned out light bulb. A buck shot in an experiment. Put 10 Volts on your phone and it gets a little more expensive. What's the retail price going to be? $700? $800?
    03-08-2015 03:20 PM
  3. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    It would be nice if there were one that supported Quick charge 2.0. I saw that there was one out that supported it but you have to buy it in bulk unfortunately.
    03-08-2015 04:25 PM
  4. npaladin-2000's Avatar
    It would be nice if there were one that supported Quick charge 2.0. I saw that there was one out that supported it but you have to buy it in bulk unfortunately.
    Where was it? Has to be a way to get one.
    03-09-2015 12:03 AM
  5. jcp007's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.)

    2) As long as the source of power - wall, power bank, tamed lightning - can supply as much current as the phone draws, it charges in the same amount of time. You don't push more current into the phone by using a larger power bank - electricity doesn't work that way. (At least it didn't back when I got my electrical engineering degree, and I haven't read about anyone discovering a new kind of electricity.) The phone draws what it's designed to draw. Put it on a 500,000mAh power bank and it'll charge just as fast as from a 5,000mAh power bank. The larger the power bank capacity, the more times you can charge the phone before having to charge the power bank (which you also shouldn't drop below 40% of its capacity), but the larger it is, the longer it usually takes to charge. (The ones with built-in chargers that are designed for a 1C charge, will all recharge in the same amount of time, regardless of their capacity - about 60 minutes. But if you're recharging a 10,000mAh power bank with a 2 Amp charger, it's going to take a minimum of about 4.5 hours if you charge it from 40%. A 10 Amp battery, with a 75% charging efficiency, needing a 6 Amp-hour charge, being charged at a 2 Amp rate equals 4.5 hours. 3rd grade arithmetic. Or do they wait until 4th grade to teach division?)

    If the phone charges in 2 hours, the power bank will charge it in 2 hours. If the phone charges in 3 hours, the only way to put enough power into the phone in 2 hours would be to raise the voltage of the charger. But then you don't have an S6, you have a burned out phone. Again, Electricity 101. The power bank can't change the effective resistance of the phone, and that's what determines how much current it draws (which equates to how fast it charges - assuming that the phone is off; if it's on, running enough stuff [like a really weak phone signal and the screen turned up all the way] so it's using 1000mA, and it can only draw 1200mA, it's charging at a 200mA rate [0.2 Amps]) - and no power bank in the world is going to change that. (My phone charges just as fast from the 2 Amp OEM wall charger as it does from my 30 Amp bench supply. It draws 1200mA in either case. That's how it's designed. I could put it on a 500 Amp supply and it would still take the same time.)

    Your house is a 200 Amp supply, but a 100 Watt light bulb still draws a little under 1 Amp. Connect it to a 5,000 Amp supply and it'll draw the same current. Put it on a 220 Volt supply and it'll draw 2 Amps? No, it'll act like a flash bulb. POP! (You'll actually hear that.) Then it'll be a burned out light bulb. A buck shot in an experiment. Put 10 Volts on your phone and it gets a little more expensive. What's the retail price going to be? $700? $800?
    Can we make this a sticky?
    dancing-bass likes this.
    03-09-2015 12:41 AM
  6. atakin77's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.)

    2) As long as the source of power - wall, power bank, tamed lightning - can supply as much current as the phone draws, it charges in the same amount of time. You don't push more current into the phone by using a larger power bank - electricity doesn't work that way. (At least it didn't back when I got my electrical engineering degree, and I haven't read about anyone discovering a new kind of electricity.) The phone draws what it's designed to draw. Put it on a 500,000mAh power bank and it'll charge just as fast as from a 5,000mAh power bank. The larger the power bank capacity, the more times you can charge the phone before having to charge the power bank (which you also shouldn't drop below 40% of its capacity), but the larger it is, the longer it usually takes to charge. (The ones with built-in chargers that are designed for a 1C charge, will all recharge in the same amount of time, regardless of their capacity - about 60 minutes. But if you're recharging a 10,000mAh power bank with a 2 Amp charger, it's going to take a minimum of about 4.5 hours if you charge it from 40%. A 10 Amp battery, with a 75% charging efficiency, needing a 6 Amp-hour charge, being charged at a 2 Amp rate equals 4.5 hours. 3rd grade arithmetic. Or do they wait until 4th grade to teach division?)

    If the phone charges in 2 hours, the power bank will charge it in 2 hours. If the phone charges in 3 hours, the only way to put enough power into the phone in 2 hours would be to raise the voltage of the charger. But then you don't have an S6, you have a burned out phone. Again, Electricity 101. The power bank can't change the effective resistance of the phone, and that's what determines how much current it draws (which equates to how fast it charges - assuming that the phone is off; if it's on, running enough stuff [like a really weak phone signal and the screen turned up all the way] so it's using 1000mA, and it can only draw 1200mA, it's charging at a 200mA rate [0.2 Amps]) - and no power bank in the world is going to change that. (My phone charges just as fast from the 2 Amp OEM wall charger as it does from my 30 Amp bench supply. It draws 1200mA in either case. That's how it's designed. I could put it on a 500 Amp supply and it would still take the same time.)

    Your house is a 200 Amp supply, but a 100 Watt light bulb still draws a little under 1 Amp. Connect it to a 5,000 Amp supply and it'll draw the same current. Put it on a 220 Volt supply and it'll draw 2 Amps? No, it'll act like a flash bulb. POP! (You'll actually hear that.) Then it'll be a burned out light bulb. A buck shot in an experiment. Put 10 Volts on your phone and it gets a little more expensive. What's the retail price going to be? $700? $800?
    Can you explain not charging below 40%? I've heard that but also heard you should try to limit the number of charging cycles which seems to run counter to this. Might make me reconsider what I consider an all day battery if you need to really consider 50% or so drained and needing to be on a charger. Thanks in advance.
    03-09-2015 04:21 AM
  7. clevin's Avatar
    Can you explain not charging below 40%? I've heard that but also heard you should try to limit the number of charging cycles which seems to run counter to this. Might make me reconsider what I consider an all day battery if you need to really consider 50% or so drained and needing to be on a charger. Thanks in advance.
    Charge cycle is not number of times you charge it. An partial discharge and recharge is not one cycle.

    @T-Mobile GN3
    03-09-2015 05:09 AM
  8. atakin77's Avatar
    Charge cycle is not number of times you charge it. An partial discharge and recharge is not one cycle.

    @T-Mobile GN3
    What constitutes a charge cycle then? And how many per battery? I've heard 300 - 500 cycles before the battery starts to degrade.
    MLazarusM2 likes this.
    03-09-2015 05:28 AM
  9. dancing-bass's Avatar
    What constitutes a charge cycle then? And how many per battery? I've heard 300 - 500 cycles before the battery starts to degrade.
    A charge cycle is a full charge from almost empty. So 5x charches from 80% to 100% (20% charge X 5 = 100%) would be one charge cycle.

    I always plug my phone in whenever I can, esp if it's going to be more than 15 minutes. I'd rather do a few top up charges rather then a longer charge (which I don't night regardless). I don't have a desk job so if I have a few minutes where I can charge I take advantage of it.
    MLazarusM2 likes this.
    03-09-2015 06:03 AM
  10. clevin's Avatar
    What constitutes a charge cycle then? And how many per battery? I've heard 300 - 500 cycles before the battery starts to degrade.
    There is actually no clear answer to the definition of charge cycle, although above post makes alot of sense. Still, use and understand the concept of DoD (depth of discharge). read here Battery Discharge Methods – Battery University .

    300-500 is commonly seen, but it does not mean battery is always good until 300-500 cycle runs out, as the battery capacity is always continuously degrading.

    The number means, after 300-500 full discharge cycles, battery capacity reaches a predetermined threshold, which is normally 75% of original charge. read here How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University

    Note, 300-500 is based on assumption of normal usage, you can actually increase that number, by following the link above. I have a write up here as well http://forums.androidcentral.com/goo...tery-life.html
    atakin77 likes this.
    03-09-2015 06:14 AM
  11. atakin77's Avatar
    There is actually no clear answer to the definition of charge cycle, although above post makes alot of sense. Still, use and understand the concept of DoD (depth of discharge). read here Battery Discharge Methods – Battery University .

    300-500 is commonly seen, but it does not mean battery is always good until 300-500 cycle runs out, as the battery capacity is always continuously degrading.

    The number means, after 300-500 full discharge cycles, battery capacity reaches a predetermined threshold, which is normally 75% of original charge. read here How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University

    Note, 300-500 is based on assumption of normal usage, you can actually increase that number, by following the link above. I have a write up here as well http://forums.androidcentral.com/goo...tery-life.html
    Thank you, I'm going to read these. Very helpful...
    Bodrul likes this.
    03-09-2015 06:19 AM
  12. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    Where was it? Has to be a way to get one.
    Here's the link
    http://m.alibaba.com/product/6002043...asRedirected=y
    03-09-2015 09:29 AM
  13. ilordvader's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.)

    2) As long as the source of power - wall, power bank, tamed lightning - can supply as much current as the phone draws, it charges in the same amount of time. You don't push more current into the phone by using a larger power bank - electricity doesn't work that way. (At least it didn't back when I got my electrical engineering degree, and I haven't read about anyone discovering a new kind of electricity.) The phone draws what it's designed to draw. Put it on a 500,000mAh power bank and it'll charge just as fast as from a 5,000mAh power bank. The larger the power bank capacity, the more times you can charge the phone before having to charge the power bank (which you also shouldn't drop below 40% of its capacity), but the larger it is, the longer it usually takes to charge. (The ones with built-in chargers that are designed for a 1C charge, will all recharge in the same amount of time, regardless of their capacity - about 60 minutes. But if you're recharging a 10,000mAh power bank with a 2 Amp charger, it's going to take a minimum of about 4.5 hours if you charge it from 40%. A 10 Amp battery, with a 75% charging efficiency, needing a 6 Amp-hour charge, being charged at a 2 Amp rate equals 4.5 hours. 3rd grade arithmetic. Or do they wait until 4th grade to teach division?)

    If the phone charges in 2 hours, the power bank will charge it in 2 hours. If the phone charges in 3 hours, the only way to put enough power into the phone in 2 hours would be to raise the voltage of the charger. But then you don't have an S6, you have a burned out phone. Again, Electricity 101. The power bank can't change the effective resistance of the phone, and that's what determines how much current it draws (which equates to how fast it charges - assuming that the phone is off; if it's on, running enough stuff [like a really weak phone signal and the screen turned up all the way] so it's using 1000mA, and it can only draw 1200mA, it's charging at a 200mA rate [0.2 Amps]) - and no power bank in the world is going to change that. (My phone charges just as fast from the 2 Amp OEM wall charger as it does from my 30 Amp bench supply. It draws 1200mA in either case. That's how it's designed. I could put it on a 500 Amp supply and it would still take the same time.)

    Your house is a 200 Amp supply, but a 100 Watt light bulb still draws a little under 1 Amp. Connect it to a 5,000 Amp supply and it'll draw the same current. Put it on a 220 Volt supply and it'll draw 2 Amps? No, it'll act like a flash bulb. POP! (You'll actually hear that.) Then it'll be a burned out light bulb. A buck shot in an experiment. Put 10 Volts on your phone and it gets a little more expensive. What's the retail price going to be? $700? $800?
    Thank+ that was very helpful
    03-10-2015 02:27 PM
  14. STEVESKI07's Avatar
    Some interesting and insightful stuff posted here, thanks guys. But I'm still a little unclear as to what is good and what is bad for the battery? I see that draining it down to 0 is bad and keeping it between 30-80% is optimal, but what about for those of that want to go to 100%? Is it bad to leave the phone plugged in at 100% all night? Would it be better to leave my phone uncharged at night and then just charge it when I get to work and keep it in that 30-80% range when possible?

    Obviously there are times when I'll be gone all day and will leave it on the charger all night so I can be at 100% in case I need the full battery the next day, but when I can, am I correct in reading that I shouldn't charge to 100% and if I do charge to 100% it is bad to leave the phone plugged in while its at 100%?
    03-10-2015 03:10 PM
  15. Almeuit's Avatar
    I am sure more that 60% will need a Power Bank for there phones

    After you get your GS6, Please do mention which Power Bank you got
    & how long does it take you to charge the phone fully drained

    hoping to get one that charges the phone within 2hrs
    60%? I am curious where you got that number.
    03-10-2015 03:34 PM
  16. akutch34's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.
    Here we go with this again... I never understood this argument. I always let my phones drain to 10% or under... usually not necessarily by choice, just because that's what it ends up being when I go to bed at night. I always plug my phone in @ bed and charge over night. I have never once needed to replace any of my phone batteries, nor have I ever had any issue with my batteries holding a charge. The only problem I've ever had was a broken usb port, and that was due being stepped on. Basically, I very rarely see people with this actual issue, more just people freaking out over it for no reason...
    Bodrul, lindseybp, deeb215 and 3 others like this.
    03-10-2015 04:03 PM
  17. smooth4lyfe's Avatar
    1) NEVER fully drain the battery. Unless it's impossible, don't let it drop below 40%. Replacing the battery in an S6 isn't a $15 affair - you'll pay more than that just for the labor. Drain the battery all the way every time and you'll be replacing it in 6 months. (That's how lithium battries work. You want one you can drain all the way? You'll need a lead-acid battery - a storage battery of the type used in cars. One large enough for a cellphone weighs pounds.)
    There are so many theories on this idk what to believe...I here don't drain, I hear drain fully

    Gorilla Gadgets say drain to 5% before filling up
    Extended Battery
    lindseybp likes this.
    03-10-2015 04:14 PM
  18. clevin's Avatar
    Here we go with this again... I never understood this argument. I always let my phones drain to 10% or under... usually not necessarily by choice, just because that's what it ends up being when I go to bed at night. I always plug my phone in @ bed and charge over night. I have never once needed to replace any of my phone batteries, nor have I ever had any issue with my batteries holding a charge. The only problem I've ever had was a broken usb port, and that was due being stepped on. Basically, I very rarely see people with this actual issue, more just people freaking out over it for no reason...
    I am unsure fact will change whether you understand or not. These are test-based, science driven conclusions. You don't need to understand completely, and your individual evidence doesn't overwrite vast experiment and test done.

    Is it bad to leave the phone plugged in at 100% all night? Would it be better to leave my phone uncharged at night and then just charge it when I get to work and keep it in that 30-80% range when possible?
    with rapid charging, why not charge it in the morning for half an hr instead lugged in all night long?

    charging overnight would means the battery is near 100% all night, and high battery level/high voltage of the battery cell, is a negative factor for battery longevity.
    03-10-2015 04:22 PM
  19. akutch34's Avatar
    I am unsure fact will change whether you understand or not. These are test-based, science driven conclusions. You don't need to understand completely, and your individual evidence doesn't overwrite vast experiment and test done.
    No need to be rude. I am simply saying PERSONALLY I've never experienced this issue, and I've never met anyone in real life that has. That's why it's never been important in my eyes whether I charge at 50% or if I just use my phone as usual, it drains during the day, and charge at night. I'm not discounting YOUR testing results. Was just stating personal experience.
    03-10-2015 05:31 PM
  20. clevin's Avatar
    There are so many theories on this idk what to believe...I here don't drain, I hear drain fully

    Gorilla Gadgets say drain to 5% before filling up
    Extended Battery
    I trust batteryuniversity.com much more than gorilla gadget, I have a 6400 mAh gorilla gadget battery, they sent me the wrong colored back! Now my phone has black front and white back, ridiculous!
    03-10-2015 05:47 PM
  21. smooth4lyfe's Avatar
    I trust batteryuniversity.com much more than gorilla gadget, I have a 6400 mAh gorilla gadget battery, they sent me the wrong colored back! Now my phone has black front and white back, ridiculous!
    Lol sucks, I haven't had any bad experience with them their batteries are pretty good
    03-10-2015 06:43 PM
  22. ilordvader's Avatar
    03-19-2015 02:03 AM
  23. iphoner5454's Avatar
    Waiting for the OPO powerbank 10mAh and $14.99 !!! INSANE !! And based on their quality products so far ( include accessories ) I don't thnik they are going to fail ...
    03-19-2015 03:47 AM
  24. clevin's Avatar
    Waiting for the OPO powerbank 10mAh and $14.99 !!! INSANE !! And based on their quality products so far ( include accessories ) I don't thnik they are going to fail ...
    you mean 10Ah?
    03-19-2015 04:57 AM
  25. jcp007's Avatar
    I am unsure fact will change whether you understand or not. These are test-based, science driven conclusions. You don't need to understand completely, and your individual evidence doesn't overwrite vast experiment and test done.

    Power bank results aside. The poster makes a good point. Absent a bad battery or the USB, issues experienced by some, not me, I am in the same boat. Charge overnight. Charge in car when needed. Charge at office as needed. Even on business or personal travel where charging isn't always possible, never had issues needing battery swaps only saw wall hungers and never batteries being swapped out. It seems that those missing it the most are in the minority.

    with rapid charging, why not charge it in the morning for half an hr instead lugged in all night long?

    charging overnight would means the battery is near 100% all night, and high battery level/high voltage of the battery cell, is a negative factor for battery longevity.
    03-19-2015 06:59 AM
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