07-01-2015 04:05 PM
51 123
tools
  1. chezm's Avatar

    Here is how crappy the 3gb ram utilisation is. It gets destroyed in multitasking and reloading apps by the M9. Even the iPhone beats it!
    Galaxy S6 vs. HTC One M9 vs. iPhone 6 Speed Test:
    Utilization and optimization are completely different things that people misconstrued. Android OEM dont have the hardware with OS as well optimized as Apple does with their own hardware, with that said iOS is a very process idle platform and very limited to how it functions. Android exceeds apple in the area that it can function as a portable PC, which it is utilized to do. Apple utilization is next to none and can get by on 1gb of ram due to is very rigiment and halting processing. There are many things Android can do that it's could never and that's where the lack of knowledge lies in the ones who consistently raise these arguments.

    Does that mean iOS is poor? Definitely not, it's super solid and performs as it's expected. Is it better than Android on terms of optimization? Yes definitely. Is it better in utilization? Completely different systems running very different spectrums. How you want and what you want from your phone is the key.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 08:14 AM
  2. Bodzm's Avatar
    Utilization and optimization are completely different things that people misconstrued. Android OEM dont have the hardware with OS as well optimized as Apple does with their own hardware, with that said iOS is a very process idle platform and very limited to how it functions. Android exceeds apple in the area that it can function as a portable PC, which it is utilized to do. Apple utilization is next to none and can get by on 1gb of ram due to is very rigiment and halting processing. There are many things Android can do that it's could never and that's where the lack of knowledge lies in the ones who consistently raise these arguments.

    Does that mean iOS is poor? Definitely not, it's super solid and performs as it's expected. Is it better than Android on terms of optimization? Yes definitely. Is it better in utilization? Completely different systems running very different spectrums. How you want and what you want from your phone is the key.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Were you not surprised how slow the S6 was at multitasking then? This isn't an iOS or Android debate. The M9 is Android and performed much better than the S6.
    05-02-2015 09:52 AM
  3. Gator352's Avatar
    Were you not surprised how slow the S6 was at multitasking then? This isn't an iOS or Android debate. The M9 is Android and performed much better than the S6.
    Until we get the update....

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 10:05 AM
  4. chezm's Avatar
    Were you not surprised how slow the S6 was at multitasking then? This isn't an iOS or Android debate. The M9 is Android and performed much better than the S6.
    Honestly the multitasking is fine, I have no personal issues with it. Coming from a nexus 5 which is stock I expected a slight delay with touch wiz but it's better than I honestly expected. As for HTC, my buddy has an M8 and it's definitely lightening fast but the difference isn't very noticeable.

    I have far too much things going on that a split second doesn't really get noticed...that's me.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    deeb215 likes this.
    05-02-2015 11:40 AM
  5. warpdrive's Avatar
    Of course there's a ram issue. This again just highlights how some users don't notice things or are happy with performance because they're used to it. One size doesn't fit all. Like saying no lag but then I play on the S6 and see dropped frames and make it lag within minutes. It's there, but if you're used to it or don't mind it, then it's nothing to worry about

    Here is how crappy the 3gb ram utilisation is. It gets destroyed in multitasking and reloading apps by the M9. Even the iPhone beats it!
    Galaxy S6 vs. HTC One M9 vs. iPhone 6 Speed Test:

    Lollipop does have a memory leak issue but Samsung has it's own problems since you don't see the M9 struggling
    Some of you are in denial but will quickly change your tune when you see improvements.


    Posted via the Android Central App
    Actually I watched the video twice and I didn't see any multitasking done on any phone. Call it semantics or call it proper use of the English language, but task switching or reopening of apps is NOT multitasking. (and if you are a phone website (that makes videos) that clearly doesn't know the difference, then you are a failure)

    Of the 3 the only phone that can do two things at once (limited as it might be) is the S6. That doesn't mean that the S6 doesn't have issues. Maybe it will be fixed in an update, but Sofar I'm not too concerned. Since I'm a pretty heavy gamer, I find that most of the time my apps reopening without the need to reload them. But I'm also not trying to get my phone to fail like in the video.

    Now you might say that I'm being too nitpicky about my choice of words... Task switching vs multitasking.
    But the fact is that if we here in the community don't use the proper words, than why even bother discussing it and confusing our fellow readership who might know far less than us? Why not just make up words all the time when we talk about phones? Heck, why even call them phones at all? Why not call them puppies? After all, my puppy is far better than your puppy and my sapphire black puppy looks great out in the sunlight. Or should we even use the word sunlight at all, and just call it a different name too like jello or peanut butter. Because you know how hot our puppies look outside in bright peanut butter, right?

    PS: I'm sorry, it will be my last rant of the day.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 01:38 PM
  6. jcp007's Avatar
    Actually I watched the video twice and I didn't see any multitasking done on any phone. Call it semantics or call it proper use of the English language, but task switching or reopening of apps is NOT multitasking. (and if you are a phone website (that makes videos) that clearly doesn't know the difference, then you are a failure)

    Of the 3 the only phone that can do two things at once (limited as it might be) is the S6. That doesn't mean that the S6 doesn't have issues. Maybe it will be fixed in an update, but Sofar I'm not too concerned. Since I'm a pretty heavy gamer, I find that most of the time my apps reopening without the need to reload them. But I'm also not trying to get my phone to fail like in the video.

    Now you might say that I'm being too nitpicky about my choice of words... Task switching vs multitasking.
    But the fact is that if we here in the community don't use the proper words, than why even bother discussing it and confusing our fellow readership who might know far less than us? Why not just make up words all the time when we talk about phones? Heck, why even call them phones at all? Why not call them puppies? After all, my puppy is far better than your puppy and my sapphire black puppy looks great out in the sunlight. Or should we even use the word sunlight at all, and just call it a different name too like jello or peanut butter. Because you know how hot our puppies look outside in bright peanut butter, right?

    PS: I'm sorry, it will be my last rant of the day.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    I agree task switching is far different from having the browser and email client open on the screen at the same time. The only phone that does it better is the GN4.
    05-02-2015 02:29 PM
  7. Bodzm's Avatar
    Actually I watched the video twice and I didn't see any multitasking done on any phone. Call it semantics or call it proper use of the English language, but task switching or reopening of apps is NOT multitasking. (and if you are a phone website (that makes videos) that clearly doesn't know the difference, then you are a failure)

    Of the 3 the only phone that can do two things at once (limited as it might be) is the S6. That doesn't mean that the S6 doesn't have issues. Maybe it will be fixed in an update, but Sofar I'm not too concerned. Since I'm a pretty heavy gamer, I find that most of the time my apps reopening without the need to reload them. But I'm also not trying to get my phone to fail like in the video.

    Now you might say that I'm being too nitpicky about my choice of words... Task switching vs multitasking.
    But the fact is that if we here in the community don't use the proper words, than why even bother discussing it and confusing our fellow readership who might know far less than us? Why not just make up words all the time when we talk about phones? Heck, why even call them phones at all? Why not call them puppies? After all, my puppy is far better than your puppy and my sapphire black puppy looks great out in the sunlight. Or should we even use the word sunlight at all, and just call it a different name too like jello or peanut butter. Because you know how hot our puppies look outside in bright peanut butter, right?

    PS: I'm sorry, it will be my last rant of the day.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Multitasking in common English is to do more than one task at a time, have more than one app open and switch between them to "get stuff done" without losing where you were, thereby making progress at you discretion. Perhaps you are typing something on the AC forums, you switch to Chrome and a few other apps, then switch back to AC and it decides to re-load the app and lose your post - that's poor "multitasking." Perhaps that isn't multitasking in a technical sense, but it illustrates the point.

    And if you want to be pedantic, all 3 phones DO multitask - you can listen to music whilst browsing the net for instance, or upload photos whilst you play a game. And if you want to be even more pedantic, running the cell phone application in the background during the entire day whilst using your phone is running multiple processes, which is in fact multitasking and i'd say all smartphones can do this. There's no need to be so pedantic on an informal forum where the initial context was pretty clear.
    05-02-2015 03:00 PM
  8. DSMpowerhousegroup's Avatar
    It's already clearly the fastest phone I've owned.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    mxrider821 likes this.
    05-02-2015 03:03 PM
  9. Gator352's Avatar
    It's already clearly the fastest phone I've owned.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Yeah same here. It's a powerhouse! Just my reception sucks and sprint has now acknowledged it. No fix any time soon.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    racedog likes this.
    05-02-2015 04:24 PM
  10. jcp007's Avatar
    Multitasking in common English is to do more than one task at a time, have more than one app open and switch between them to "get stuff done" without losing where you were, thereby making progress at you discretion. Perhaps you are typing something on the AC forums, you switch to Chrome and a few other apps, then switch back to AC and it decides to re-load the app and lose your post - that's poor "multitasking." Perhaps that isn't multitasking in a technical sense, but it illustrates the point.

    And if you want to be pedantic, all 3 phones DO multitask - you can listen to music whilst browsing the net for instance, or upload photos whilst you play a game. And if you want to be even more pedantic, running the cell phone application in the background during the entire day whilst using your phone is running multiple processes, which is in fact multitasking and i'd say all smartphones can do this. There's no need to be so pedantic on an informal forum where the initial context was pretty clear.
    What you've just described is task switching in which one task is running in the background while doing a task. Multi-tasking involves having the same display with two different tasks at the same time. The GS6 can do this with another task running in the background.
    05-02-2015 04:44 PM
  11. Bodzm's Avatar
    What you've just described is task switching in which one task is running in the background while doing a task. Multi-tasking involves having the same display with two different tasks at the same time. The GS6 can do this with another task running in the background.
    No it's not. Multitasking is two or more concurrent tasks. It is not restricted to viewing two windows at once
    05-02-2015 05:14 PM
  12. Wiggum333's Avatar
    No it's not. Multitasking is two or more concurrent tasks. It is not restricted to viewing two windows at once
    Exactly.
    05-02-2015 05:33 PM
  13. warpdrive's Avatar
    Multitasking in common English is to do more than one task at a time, have more than one app open and switch between them to "get stuff done" without losing where you were, thereby making progress at you discretion. Perhaps you are typing something on the AC forums, you switch to Chrome and a few other apps, then switch back to AC and it decides to re-load the app and lose your post - that's poor "multitasking." Perhaps that isn't multitasking in a technical sense, but it illustrates the point.

    And if you want to be pedantic, all 3 phones DO multitask - you can listen to music whilst browsing the net for instance, or upload photos whilst you play a game. And if you want to be even more pedantic, running the cell phone application in the background during the entire day whilst using your phone is running multiple processes, which is in fact multitasking and i'd say all smartphones can do this. There's no need to be so pedantic on an informal forum where the initial context was pretty clear.
    You're right. In common English multitasking is doing 2 or more things at once. So when I'm cleaning the house while listening to music, I'm multitasking well. But we aren't talking about common English. We are talking about computers or technical terms of said computer function. So when talking about multitasking in computers, while they multitask tons of things in the background, what we are describing is two or more things on your screen.

    So when I talk about task switching or switching between the latest tasks that you have performed, I don't just use words that are not related and can confuse a typical consumer. For example, I don't call the recent app button the multitask button because a) that's not what Google or Android calls it, and b) the function doesn't do a multitask event on your screen, it just opens up the task switcher to allow you to switch between your recent apps.

    Speaking of the task switcher, why didn't Google just call it the multitasking page if it describes what your taking about? The answer is simple. It doesn't. They call it the task switcher because you use it to switch between the apps that you recently used. And if you read some of the functions of such "thingie" you'll find that you can remove such recent apps (not multitask apps) from the task switcher by swiping them away (or in the case of the S6 you not only can do it that way, but also by hitting the close button (the X)).

    This might be a boring topic to discuss in your point of view. But remember, this forum is here to help people learn about their phone and not confuse them more. It's because people in general didn't learn the technical terms properly is how this got confusing to most people. So confusing for some that when they try to make an informative video that the do called experts sometimes call it the wrong name and further confusing the general public on what he is talking about.

    I'm just wondering, do you always call the screen on a phone the lookieloo or do you call or the screen? Do you call the home button the dropdown button? Do you call the battery the energy dodad? And lastly do you call the back button the forward button because it forward you to the last thing that you were on?
    Many of the above are words used by lay people and that's fine as they are not here to help, teach, or inform anyone, but are here to ask for help. There is also no reason not to use general terms to describe a button when a lay person doesn't know what you are talking about, such as the overflow menu button is described allot like a button that looks like a hamburger.... But we don't call it the hamburger button generally, we call it the overflow menu button.

    Notice how I still didn't talk about the test in question yet? That's because this test can have drastically different results for each time that you do it. In fact, if I'm not mistaken this isn't the first time the S6 was tested in such a way by this website. Only the m9 wasn't included back then just before the reviews were out. And in that test between the two phones (S6 vs ip6) the iPhone 6 won instead of the S6 like in this case.
    Just think, the S6 was winning the whole time, yet maybe location services enabled just before he tried to open the game and NOW the game couldn't connect to Google's play game service to log in the user and enable any saves, thus why the game hung the second time it tries to load. It's a bad test. A really bad test and should be taken with a huge grain of flavor infusion material that everyone calls salt and not some other name because it is popular at the time to mix up words.

    PS: I'm sorry to the readership for not keeping my promise.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    jcp007 likes this.
    05-02-2015 06:19 PM
  14. warpdrive's Avatar
    No it's not. Multitasking is two or more concurrent tasks. It is not restricted to viewing two windows at once
    Correct, only the task that was listed in the task switcher is NOT running concurrently. It was put to sleep and is now considered a recent or recently used app.

    A good test is open your settings and goto the battery. Now you have the battery graph listed on your screen with the percentage shown. Now hit the home button. Now do anything else for the next few minutes, it doesn't matter what. All this time your battery should drain at least a little bit. But after a few minutes if you were to hit the recent button, you'll notice that if you flick through the recent apps in there, without opening the battery monitor the battery percent is listed as the same as what it was at the time of you closing the battery monitor. But once you hit it to reopen, it will now update the percentage to be what it is really at right now.

    That's because it is NOT multitasking or running concurrently, but was put to sleep and was then a recent app. If it was multitasking, it would be always updating the percentage even from within the task switcher and not fully on your screen.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 06:39 PM
  15. Wiggum333's Avatar
    Warpdrive ... I'm no expert, so I'll concede that what you are saying is technically correct. However, I have a hard time wrapping my head around what you're saying.

    By your logic/explanation, even if I'm running windows 7 and have 4 applications open, but only have ONE of them pulled up on my monitor (even though all 4 are "maximized" behind it ... I'm not (ie: the computer is not) "multitasking"???

    I just find it hard to understand how displaying an open app vs. not displaying it determines whether or not you are "multitasking". By that logic, multitasking depends as much on the video card and video capabilities as it does the ability of the computer to run multiple processes and applications simultaneously.

    I'm not arguing with you ... I'm just genuinely confused since you say (to paraphrase) that you have to have the apps VISIBLE ON SCREEN AT THE SAME TIME to consider it "multitasking".
    05-02-2015 06:40 PM
  16. jcp007's Avatar
    You're right. In common English multitasking is doing 2 or more things at once. So when I'm cleaning the house while listening to music, I'm multitasking well. But we aren't talking about common English. We are talking about computers or technical terms of said computer function. So when talking about multitasking in computers, while they multitask tons of things in the background, what we are describing is two or more things on your screen.

    So when I talk about task switching or switching between the latest tasks that you have performed, I don't just use words that are not related and can confuse a typical consumer. For example, I don't call the recent app button the multitask button because a) that's not what Google or Android calls it, and b) the function doesn't do a multitask event on your screen, it just opens up the task switcher to allow you to switch between your recent apps.

    Speaking of the task switcher, why didn't Google just call it the multitasking page if it describes what your taking about? The answer is simple. It doesn't. They call it the task switcher because you use it to switch between the apps that you recently used. And if you read some of the functions of such "thingie" you'll find that you can remove such recent apps (not multitask apps) from the task switcher by swiping them away (or in the case of the S6 you not only can do it that way, but also by hitting the close button (the X)).

    This might be a boring topic to discuss in your point of view. But remember, this forum is here to help people learn about their phone and not confuse them more. It's because people in general didn't learn the technical terms properly is how this got confusing to most people. So confusing for some that when they try to make an informative video that the do called experts sometimes call it the wrong name and further confusing the general public on what he is talking about.

    I'm just wondering, do you always call the screen on a phone the lookieloo or do you call or the screen? Do you call the home button the dropdown button? Do you call the battery the energy dodad? And lastly do you call the back button the forward button because it forward you to the last thing that you were on?
    Many of the above are words used by lay people and that's fine as they are not here to help, teach, or inform anyone, but are here to ask for help. There is also no reason not to use general terms to describe a button when a lay person doesn't know what you are talking about, such as the overflow menu button is described allot like a button that looks like a hamburger.... But we don't call it the hamburger button generally, we call it the overflow menu button.

    Notice how I still didn't talk about the test in question yet? That's because this test can have drastically different results for each time that you do it. In fact, if I'm not mistaken this isn't the first time the S6 was tested in such a way by this website. Only the m9 wasn't included back then just before the reviews were out. And in that test between the two phones (S6 vs ip6) the iPhone 6 won instead of the S6 like in this case.
    Just think, the S6 was winning the whole time, yet maybe location services enabled just before he tried to open the game and NOW the game couldn't connect to Google's play game service to log in the user and enable any saves, thus why the game hung the second time it tries to load. It's a bad test. A really bad test and should be taken with a huge grain of flavor infusion material that everyone calls salt and not some other name because it is popular at the time to mix up words.

    PS: I'm sorry to the readership for not keeping my promise.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Switching between two open apps using the recent apps button is multitasking only by the semantic distinction that more than one task being accomplished on a concurrent basis. With the browser and email open on the display simultaneously, the technical definition is fullfilled. If a task is running in the background, then the GS6 is performing multitasking while concurrently running another one. To get to the concurrent task, we need to access the recent apps button to perform the actual switch so the two tasks that were being performed at the same time are paused while the separate, concurrent task is accessed. At this point, you are accessing only one task. In the GS6 multitasking example mentioned earlier, you have two tasks available at the same time to be accessed without having to stop and select the recent apps button to get the other task.
    05-02-2015 06:41 PM
  17. warpdrive's Avatar
    Warpdrive ... I'm no expert, so I'll concede that what you are saying is technically correct. However, I have a hard time wrapping my head around what you're saying.

    By your logic/explanation, even if I'm running windows 7 and have 4 applications open, but only have ONE of them pulled up on my monitor (even though all 4 are "maximized" behind it ... I'm not (ie: the computer is not) "multitasking"???

    I just find it hard to understand how displaying an open app vs. not displaying it determines whether or not you are "multitasking". By that logic, multitasking depends as much on the video card and video capabilities as it does the ability of the computer to run multiple processes and applications simultaneously.

    I'm not arguing with you ... I'm just genuinely confused since you say (to paraphrase) that you have to have the apps VISIBLE ON SCREEN AT THE SAME TIME to consider it "multitasking".
    Read my reply just above yours and I hope I described it more clear for you. And yes, true multitasking does require far more resources such as a better video card and normally far more ram.

    Minimized programs or apps can and do run in the background all the time. But in the case we are talking about we are talking about apps that were closed or put to sleep and are NOT running in the background all the time.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 06:53 PM
  18. jcp007's Avatar
    Funny being separated by a common language. With concurrent tasks, the device is running two apps at the same time needing the recent apps button thus task switching. In the multitasking example, the user is performing more than one task at a time or has them available at the same time.
    05-02-2015 06:58 PM
  19. chezm's Avatar
    Minimized programs or apps can and do run in the background all the time. But in the case we are talking about we are talking about apps that were closed or put to sleep and are NOT running in the background all the time.
    This is exactly the case with iOS.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 07:18 PM
  20. warpdrive's Avatar
    This is exactly the case with iOS.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    This is exactly the case with all Android phones as well. The difference with an S6 is that like most of the latest flagships from Samsung (and LG) it can an does true multitasking if the app is supported.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 07:41 PM
  21. chezm's Avatar
    This is exactly the case with all Android phones as well. The difference with an S6 is that like most of the latest flagships from Samsung (and LG) it can an does true multitasking if the app is supported.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Android at it's core is not built that way, if the app as you stated is truly multitasking, on Android it can be done whereas on iOS it cannot...that's the major difference.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-02-2015 10:12 PM
  22. Jason383's Avatar
    Same issue for Galaxy S5...
    05-02-2015 11:49 PM
  23. warpdrive's Avatar
    Android at it's core is not built that way, if the app as you stated is truly multitasking, on Android it can be done whereas on iOS it cannot...that's the major difference.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    If you press and hold the recent key on the S6, you get true multitasking. Of course, you can also do it from the task switcher with anything that has the two Windows label on it.

    Yes, on Android it can be done if programed to do so and the app supports it. I wouldn't be surprised if Apple wanted it to work on iOS, it would be done as well.

    The problem really is getting the developers to add such a feature on the app. it's why the myth that iphones have better apps is false. Because if that were true then on a Samsung device you would never have true multitasking wroth some non Sammy apps because who would want to spend time and resources creating a feature for just one brand of phone? But both the fanbois of iphones as well as Apple are never into speaking the truth. They are just into flaming anything not Apple.

    But like others and I said before, on all of our phones we have tons of apps or system programs running in the background. Such as your clock/Weather widget or app syncing of any app.

    But the real difference is that with Apple, they are willing to pay big money for exclusives. Be they games or standard apps. While Google promotes nothing. Not games or even Google wallet. Google let's the manufacturer promote features and/or exclusives.

    What I'm getting at is that if an app developer puts out an app on android that is not as good as on iphones, then a) the developers are lazy or
    b) they were paid not to improve it for Android.
    Conspiracy much? Sure, it sounds outrageous. But it happens all the time. Just look at some exclusive games like bioshock 2 that still never made it to Android. Or how on the NVidia shield tablet you can play half life 2, but not on the latest nexus tablet that has an Nvidia chipset in it or on iOS. Such exclusivity is only because of payments and in my book only hurts the developers and consumers the most in the long run.

    But my point is that developers that are not lazy can do anything they want on both iOS and Android if they put their heart and soul into it. Including true multitasking. So again, if Apple wants it too, then and only then will iOS have it. It's not that hard to implement and if Samsung can do it then clearly Apple can. Most developers are willing, but might need a push or payment to do so. After all, you don't work for free so why should an app developer?

    The only other thing that hurts Android when it comes to app development are what I call Apple myths. The total BS that Apple and it's fanbase regurgitate repeatedly that not only the fanbois believe but maybe the developers of some apps do as well. There is no other possible explanation why a developer wouldn't want to make extra money on Android other than he/she believes that the phones are not worth it to produce for the platform. After all, android has about a 45% user base in just the US. World wide, it's more like 75%. Just look at the loss of revenue regardless that some Android devices aren't flagship material. But the myths are strong with the dark one. Only the educated know the truth.

    But multitasking is not truly built into Android. Samsung added it in. LG followed. The rest are only task switching at best.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-03-2015 12:42 AM
  24. warpdrive's Avatar
    The two screen shots below are true multitasking.



    As you can see, both YouTube and an after market browser are both displayed because Samsung added in the feature and the app supports it. Some apps from tiny company's even support such multitasking, like cpuz. Now while totally unrelated, if a small company with a tiny budget like cpuz can add in a multitasking feature for Samsung devices, do you really think that a huge company like instagram can't fix a compression algorithm for Android phones in a year and a half?
    So while off topic, yes it is always the developers fault if something is or isn't done to improve it. It's not that Apple has better apps, it's that the bad apps are the developers fault on android because they are lazy or not paid off.

    Beemed to you with the GS6
    05-03-2015 01:12 AM
  25. warpdrive's Avatar
    Another multi-window or true multitasking with a Microsoft app that only came to Android a few months ago and cpuz (a tiny company) .



    Beemed to you with the GS6
    05-03-2015 01:17 AM
51 123

Similar Threads

  1. samsung browser pop up ads annoying.
    By AC Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-01-2015, 11:48 PM
  2. Lock Screen Issues
    By matt3166 in forum Samsung Galaxy S6 edge
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-01-2015, 11:49 AM
  3. Samsung Tab Pro 8.4 - Screen Flickering when Scrolling
    By AC Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-01-2015, 11:03 AM
  4. photos from N 6 to Picasa
    By yosemite1970 in forum Google Nexus 6
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-01-2015, 10:43 AM
  5. Samsung Galaxy S2 (SGH-I777) cannot boot into Recovery mode.
    By Kiran Johny in forum AT&T Galaxy S II
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-01-2015, 08:56 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD