03-07-2016 09:12 PM
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  1. mountainman15's Avatar
    Sure, the iPhone may perform great, but the OS is horrendous when it comes to what you want to do with it. Before anyone says anything, I'm currently using an iPhone 6s Plus as my daily driver (only until my S7 edge comes in!). I hate it. I can't do any customizing with it (except the wallpaper--whoop-dee-doo). There's no app drawer to hide the apps I'll never use so I have them all on my homescreen in a folder(?) marked "extras". There's no way to uninstall or disable these apps, either. There are no widgets on the iPhone either, which I really hate. Another gripe I have with the iPhone is that the wifi speeds seem to be slow. It takes longer to open up web pages than it did on my S6 active.

    I'm looking forward to dumping this brick later this week. I'm so over Apple.
    Agree. I have the 6s Plus as well and looking forward to getting back to Android. I have to say, though, I've been pretty impressed with it - it really is blazing fast and the battery life is far better than anything I've experienced on Android. Unfortunately, the limitations of iOS are just too much for me.
    03-06-2016 12:34 PM
  2. anon(5630457)'s Avatar
    Agree. I have the 6s Plus as well and looking forward to getting back to Android. I have to say, though, I've been pretty impressed with it - it really is blazing fast and the battery life is far better than anything I've experienced on Android. Unfortunately, the limitations of iOS are just too much for me.
    Yeah, the battery life has been amazing. But that's the only thing I like about the iPhone. I hate everything else about it.
    03-06-2016 12:55 PM
  3. KimJongOMG's Avatar
    It isn't so much that there's a problem with Qualcomm (except for the 810 fiasco), it's just that Apple has become so good at mobile chip design. The A9 is an extremely well designed, efficient chip. Even Samsung with its Exynos hasn't been able to keep up with Apple.

    It's kind of like comparing Intel to AMD in the desktop/laptop CPU space. Intel has been able to to design powerful, efficient, and cool CPUs while AMD has struggled to keep up even though their processors are more than capable.

    That said, the 820 is looking like a huge improvement over the 810 and doesn't appear to have the same issues with heat or throttling.
    AMD back in its Athlon XP days was beastly. Let's just hope Samsung follows in the footsteps of Intel. AMD thrashed Intel all day long back in those days but brute strength + optimization by Intel put AMD in its place.
    03-06-2016 01:00 PM
  4. DJCBS's Avatar
    You know what boots up faster than BOTH of these phones? My Nokia 3310.

    These comparisons are always pointless because they're comparing oranges and apples. It also doesn't help that the orange here was messed with before hand by a carrier.
    Don't put any attention to these "comparisons". All they want is your view, nothing else
    03-06-2016 01:35 PM
  5. Wildo6882's Avatar
    Agree. I have the 6s Plus as well and looking forward to getting back to Android. I have to say, though, I've been pretty impressed with it - it really is blazing fast and the battery life is far better than anything I've experienced on Android. Unfortunately, the limitations of iOS are just too much for me.
    This is my experience with my 6s Plus too. iOS is the problem. It's a dumb smartphone. I'm excited to get back to something I can make work for me. Not how Zombie Steve Jobs says it should work for me.
    03-06-2016 01:49 PM
  6. LeoRex's Avatar
    But, I still think part is the problem here might be Qualcomm (just thinking).
    The 820, so far, has shown excellent performance under heavy, extended loads. It's a really good chip. The 810 (which got a raw deal, anyhow) was designed to bridge the gap while they transitioned their own designs from 32bit (Krait) to 64bit (Kryo).

    Samsung's a bit heavy when it comes to their OS. It may have lost a few pounds, but it's still dragging a lot of mass with it. Sites are doing tests now and they are still finding that the S7, in those light duty, day to day tasks, drops frames and stutters more than the less powerful 6P. It's a much more powerful chip, that's obvious, but Samsung is never going to be lean and mean.

    But even then... No need to be alarmed, concerned, disappointed, disgruntled, dejected, vexed or annoyed.
    03-06-2016 03:39 PM
  7. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Wanna know why the iPhone is faster?

    - More optimized software due to the closed-source nature of iOS
    - NVMe-based flash storage
    - Lower-res display meaning that the hardware doesn't have to work as hard

    And really, people. If we take those 2 phones apart from each other and just use it like you normally would, will you even care which is faster? These phones are pretty quick in daily use and I seriously doubt an app opening for half-a-second later than another phone will make yours feel like a tortoise by comparison. Like I have an iPad Pro, an LG G4 and a seriously overclocked HTC One M7 running on a GPe ROM (1.73GHz --> 2.16GHz). Yes, the iPad is the chart-topper, especially in benchmarks, and it beats the other 2 when you place them side-by-side.

    But when you separate them and use each of them like you normally would, will you even notice the difference? Like, I know both my G4 and M7 are slower than my iPad. Do I feel that in daily use? No. They're still pretty darn fast for daily usage and we really need to stop comparing apples to oranges. Remember, the S7 and 6S use different ecosystems and both have a different approach when it comes to software.

    Oh, and that S7 is likely using pre-release software. The phone hasn't been officially launched yet. I could be wrong though, as it's performing pretty darn well, especially the much-improved memory management.

    So guys. Don't judge a phone solely based on how quickly it launches apps and does tasks in comparison to another phone, especially one from a different ecosystem.
    limitbreak09, SR45 and Altema22 like this.
    03-06-2016 09:49 PM
  8. inffy's Avatar
    The s7 doesn't use any pre-release software. I don't know where all these pre-release software points come from.

    The software running on these phones is the final market software. The software has been ready for like ages. They can't even ship the phone with prerelease software if they want to have googles certification.
    03-07-2016 12:17 AM
  9. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    The s7 doesn't use any pre-release software. I don't know where all these pre-release software points come from.

    The software running on these phones is the final market software. The software has been ready for like ages. They can't even ship the phone with prerelease software if they want to have googles certification.
    Really? Because I know some of last year's phones ran pre-release software before they were officially released. Pre-release as in almost ready, just a little unpolished. Maybe I was wrong all this while?

    Regardless of whatever piece of software it's running on, it's still a snappy phone.
    inffy likes this.
    03-07-2016 07:21 AM
  10. LeoRex's Avatar
    Well.. as far as pre-release and full release goes... We often see phones pop up at their announcements with versions of software that aren't final. But not always. For instance, the S7 was announced at MWC and plenty of demo units were given out. Now, Samsung was looking to get the phones out the door not long after MWC ended, so the software version on those demo units was most likely the same as those that people got when they got their retail units. Oh, there will be updates, there are ALWAYS updates that get pushed not long after launch... the world is our beta...

    But sometimes the phones are announced and demo units given out that predate the release date by several weeks, if not months. OEMs are patching the builds up until the minute they start final production (and often continue long after). So if you are at a press event and holding a phone that hasn't been prepped for final shipment, it's almost certainly running pre-release software. Trust me on that... being in software for longer than I'll admit, we'll build and patch until the truck comes up to the loading dock, so to speak.
    D13H4RD2L1V3 likes this.
    03-07-2016 08:56 AM
  11. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Well.. as far as pre-release and full release goes... We often see phones pop up at their announcements with versions of software that aren't final. But not always. For instance, the S7 was announced at MWC and plenty of demo units were given out. Now, Samsung was looking to get the phones out the door not long after MWC ended, so the software version on those demo units was most likely the same as those that people got when they got their retail units. Oh, there will be updates, there are ALWAYS updates that get pushed not long after launch... the world is our beta...

    But sometimes the phones are announced and demo units given out that predate the release date by several weeks, if not months. OEMs are patching the builds up until the minute they start final production (and often continue long after). So if you are at a press event and holding a phone that hasn't been prepped for final shipment, it's almost certainly running pre-release software. Trust me on that... being in software for longer than I'll admit, we'll build and patch until the truck comes up to the loading dock, so to speak.
    Thanks for the clarification!

    That's actually pretty nicely said.
    03-07-2016 09:15 AM
  12. galaxyfive's Avatar
    OP if it makes you feel any better Apple's A9 is most likely made by Samsung, so it's a win win!
    03-07-2016 12:04 PM
  13. Dan TheMan86's Avatar
    Apple has always optimized the living hell out of their software. You're comparing apples to oranges here. Kind of like comparing a SUV to a station wagon. Seems similar on paper but it's up to the user to determine what they really need. Sure they're both cars, but are optimized for different applications.

    I have both phones and they have their own strengths. Watching videos on the Sammy though... inky blacks and popping colors galore.
    Who are you trying to fool here? This is a PHONE vs. PHONE comparison. It IS apples to apples. The appropriate metaphor for this comparison would be a Honda Accord vs Toyota Camry. Two different cars, but both targeted towards the same market to serve the same purpose. These are both phones intended to be used for making calls and opening and using apps. I don't see how comparing the latest iPhone to the latest Galaxy isn't valid. And this goes for everyone else on here saying the same thing.
    03-07-2016 03:34 PM
  14. BergerKing's Avatar
    Hehe. The s7 (and Android in general) is way more feature packed and tweak able out of the box than Apple. All that stuff does come with the extra cost that it boots slower because it has to load so much stuff.
    Not just that, but many of those Apple apps come with fewer features than this found in many Android apps. Take SwiftKey, for example. There are a great many features the Android version has that just don't come on iOS. Strip a lot of meat out of an app, there are fewer things that need assimilation.
    03-07-2016 03:37 PM
  15. Adranalyne's Avatar
    Throw a QHD display and an operating system that isn't a glorified app drawer on the iPhone and see if it fares better in that comparison. I don't mind iOS or the iPhone, but these comparisons always amuse me. They're both really fast devices. Let's leave it at that.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    03-07-2016 03:39 PM
  16. KimJongOMG's Avatar
    Who are you trying to fool here? This is a PHONE vs. PHONE comparison. It IS apples to apples. The appropriate metaphor for this comparison would be a Honda Accord vs Toyota Camry. Two different cars, but both targeted towards the same market to serve the same purpose. These are both phones intended to be used for making calls and opening and using apps. I don't see how comparing the latest iPhone to the latest Galaxy isn't valid. And this goes for everyone else on here saying the same thing.
    You trying to tell me a SUV and a station wagon aren't both automobiles? iPhones and Androids are two different eco systems. Yes they both provide a smartphone in the end but have different ways of bringing it to the end user. They both have their strengths and weaknesses. Now if Google controlled hardware and software, in addition to completely locking their OS like Apple does, then yes, we do have an apples to apples comparison. You're not going to compare a BMW 535i to a Toyota Land Cruiser and complain about how economical the Toyota feels compared to the BMW. Or talk about the monstrous ground clearance you get in the Toyota and how you scrape going over a speed bump in the BMW.

    They're both excellent phones in their own ways.
    03-07-2016 03:42 PM
  17. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Who are you trying to fool here? This is a PHONE vs. PHONE comparison. It IS apples to apples. The appropriate metaphor for this comparison would be a Honda Accord vs Toyota Camry. Two different cars, but both targeted towards the same market to serve the same purpose. These are both phones intended to be used for making calls and opening and using apps. I don't see how comparing the latest iPhone to the latest Galaxy isn't valid. And this goes for everyone else on here saying the same thing.
    I have to respectfully disagree.

    To me and a lot of people here, it's like comparing an apple to an orange. They're both fruits, but they're different fruits. Same applies here. They're both smartphones but they're different animals. One runs iOS and has its own ecosystem. The other runs a skinned version of Android, with its own ecosystem. Both accomplish the basics, but differ a lot in other areas, such as hardware and software.

    Now, if we decide to compare a Galaxy S7 with the S6 or even the LG G5, then we're comparing apples to apples, since they both run a skinned version of Android with a lot of the same features and identical hardware.

    That said, the iPhone has usually been the real-world speed benchmark, so it's not uncommon to see tests comparing other phones with it to see how they stack up. One isn't necessarily better than the other as pretty much every flagship out there is speedy, so the decision ultimately boils down to usage pattern and personal preference.
    03-07-2016 05:01 PM
  18. ABOSWORTH007's Avatar
    Glad to soon that they fixed the RAM management on the Galaxy. The S6 RAM management is just abysmal. I'll definitely be upgrading ASAP.
    03-07-2016 07:02 PM
  19. ctk4949's Avatar
    The S7e screen looked 100x better!! The crapple phone looked dull!! lol
    03-07-2016 08:32 PM
  20. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    I have to agree with Dan, these are both smartphones, and people buy them to accomplish the same basic tasks.

    HOWEVER, there's a whole lot more to what makes one a better phone than a small difference in speed of opening or switching between tasks. I would argue that's really a pretty minor factor when compared to all the functional differences between the phones. I think it's a very worthwhile tradeoff to give up a second of load speed in trade for the far greater feature set and functionality of Android. Those things make a far greater difference in my productivity than the tiny speed advantage of the iPhone.
    03-07-2016 08:52 PM
  21. KimJongOMG's Avatar
    I love the widgets and customization possible with the Android platform. Yeah I'm forced to use an Apple for my work phone because all my designers use Macs and it's just easier that way, but I'm always reaching for my Sammy when I need to do things. It's customized just the way I like it so it's like slipping into an old pair of sweats. Comforting.
    03-07-2016 08:55 PM
  22. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    I have to respectfully disagree.

    To me and a lot of people here, it's like comparing an apple to an orange. They're both fruits, but they're different fruits. Same applies here. They're both smartphones but they're different animals. One runs iOS and has its own ecosystem. The other runs a skinned version of Android, with its own ecosystem. Both accomplish the basics, but differ a lot in other areas, such as hardware and software.

    Now, if we decide to compare a Galaxy S7 with the S6 or even the LG G5, then we're comparing apples to apples, since they both run a skinned version of Android with a lot of the same features and identical hardware.

    That said, the iPhone has usually been the real-world speed benchmark, so it's not uncommon to see tests comparing other phones with it to see how they stack up. One isn't necessarily better than the other as pretty much every flagship out there is speedy, so the decision ultimately boils down to usage pattern and personal preference.
    But you have to realize that people in real life (not phone nerds that spend time on forums) DO compare the two side by side. I've seen it many times in carrier stores, people weighing the pros and cons of iPhone vs whatever other flagship device. Sometimes the ecosystem keeps them locked in, i.e. "I've spent a lot of money in the app store" and sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes it's a particular feature that draws one person to a particular device.

    For the S7 it isn't going to be RAM management, sorry. It's going to be the big battery, or the gimmicky curved display (I don't think it's gimmicky, but "regulars" do), or the really fast camera that draws people away from the iPhone in side-by-side comparisons. Like it or not, the iPhone is the everyman benchmark device. The question is always "but is it better than iPhone" when talking about any particular feature.

    Do not underestimate the draw of "it just works" and "look how simple that is" to the average person.
    03-07-2016 09:10 PM
  23. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    I have to agree with Dan, these are both smartphones, and people buy them to accomplish the same basic tasks.

    HOWEVER, there's a whole lot more to what makes one a better phone than a small difference in speed of opening or switching between tasks. I would argue that's really a pretty minor factor when compared to all the functional differences between the phones. I think it's a very worthwhile tradeoff to give up a second of load speed in trade for the far greater feature set and functionality of Android. Those things make a far greater difference in my productivity than the tiny speed advantage of the iPhone.
    I agree.

    I don't buy a phone solely based on its speed. I buy one for its feature set, functionality and other important stuff, while also taking into account speed. I don't need the world's fastest phone, but at the same time, I need it to be as fast as possible.
    03-07-2016 09:10 PM
  24. xocomaox's Avatar
    The S7e screen looked 100x better!! The crapple phone looked dull!! lol
    The iPhone has a nice screen, albeit lower res, but I think the largest issue here is the small size of it. The S7 screen is much larger and in an almost sane sized form factor.
    03-07-2016 09:12 PM
  25. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    But you have to realize that people in real life (not phone nerds that spend time on forums) DO compare the two side by side. I've seen it many times in carrier stores, people weighing the pros and cons of iPhone vs whatever other flagship device. Sometimes the ecosystem keeps them locked in, i.e. "I've spent a lot of money in the app store" and sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes it's a particular feature that draws one person to a particular device.

    For the S7 it isn't going to be RAM management, sorry. It's going to be the big battery, or the gimmicky curved display (I don't think it's gimmicky, but "regulars" do), or the really fast camera that draws people away from the iPhone in side-by-side comparisons. Like it or not, the iPhone is the everyman benchmark device. The question is always "but is it better than iPhone" when talking about any particular feature.

    Do not underestimate the draw of "it just works" and "look how simple that is" to the average person.
    Yeah, it's not rare to see lots of people comparing any phone to an iPhone. It's kinda like THE benchmark device to compare others to

    Which I actually don't mind. It's a pretty nice all-rounder, although I still prefer the open-nature and general choice of Android, which is why you won't see me using an iPhone any time soon (though I use iPads)
    03-07-2016 09:12 PM
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