07-24-2017 06:46 PM
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  1. LanreKobz's Avatar
    It's never a good idea to leave your phone plugged in overnight, I for one always take it out in the middle of my sleep and always seems to loose about 1-5% by the time I wake up.
    04-04-2016 05:00 PM
  2. erb2000's Avatar
    Technically speaking, peak level charging for extended periods can stress the LiPo cells and lead to reduced life of the battery. When you leave a fully charged phone on a charger for extended periods, it goes through a ton of little discharge/charge cycles, and LiPo cells really don't like that all that much when they are fully charged. When you look at how pros charge LiPo cells.... we're talking guys who's job (and maybe life) relies on having that device work.... those batteries are often charged on special chargers that keep the battery at an artificially low voltage (i.e. charge) level to avoid cell stress... maybe 90-95%. So they can sit there all day and night for who knows how long without going to pot.

    If you want that LiPo battery to last as long as it can, charging to its highest possible level for the longest amount of time, you only need to do three simple things (in order of importance):

    1) Avoid extreme heat... don't leave the sucker on your dash in the summer
    2) Avoid constantly going through deep recharge cycles (100% to 5% back to 100%, etc)
    3) When it is fully charged, take it off the charger

    Now, having it sit overnight now and then, that probably won't be much of a problem. But I wouldn't make a habit of it.
    Excellent advice. I wish I had read it when I bought my S7 a year ago. I bought two wireless chargers, one for home and one for work. My phone has been almost constantly charging every since I got it, about one year. It is always sitting on one of the chargers. Just recently the screen has become unglued at the edge. I'm betting it is the battery bulging and pushing on it. I have insurance, but it'll take some effort to use it.
    03-22-2017 06:40 PM
  3. talberry's Avatar
    I've been charging my phone overnight ever since I got it about 3 months ago. Haven't gotten any problems with it yet, because I thought it would be safe to leave it on overnight..
    Maybe I should try taking it off the charger once it hits 100%
    03-23-2017 03:09 AM
  4. LeoRex's Avatar
    I've been charging my phone overnight ever since I got it about 3 months ago. Haven't gotten any problems with it yet, because I thought it would be safe to leave it on overnight..
    Maybe I should try taking it off the charger once it hits 100%
    I strongly suggest you do.

    Well, there are varying degrees of "bad". There are some things you can do... like charging your phone while it sits on your dash, baking in the summer sun... could cause the thing to rupture right then and there. But extended periods on the charger at full capacity like that isn't something that you will see quickly... even three months down the road. And if you do it for a little bit on random occasions, that won't impact much. Like what's been said earlier, a 'full charge' uses up 1 charge cycle's worth of your battery's duty cycle. If you fully charge your phone then leave it on the charger for a several hours, that charge session may have burnt 1.5 or 1.8 charge cycles. You are basically aging it prematurely.
    03-23-2017 09:34 AM
  5. pappcam's Avatar
    Wow. People still think charging your phone overnight wrecks the phone? Haven't we moved on from that yet?

    I've charged every phone I've had overnight and that includes my Note 4 and S7E that both used fast charging. If I diminished my battery capacity by 5% or 10% in the 2 years I used the phone then that is fine with me. I sure as hell won't be nervously hovering over my phone ready to rip it off the charger the second it hits 100%.

    I seriously can't believe that people are still spreading this information.
    jejb, clownin72, dlgus and 1 others like this.
    03-23-2017 09:40 AM
  6. Erm10's Avatar
    I've read so many different opinions that I don't know what to believe when it comes to the effects of fast charging and leaving it to charge overnight but I do know that my S6 battery (which was never great to begin with) became utterly terrible after about 16 months. I always used fast charging and regularly kept it plugged in overnight.

    So for my S7e, I will only use fast charging when needed and avoid leaving it plugged in after it reaches 100%.
    03-23-2017 09:40 AM
  7. jejb's Avatar
    Wow. People still think charging your phone overnight wrecks the phone? Haven't we moved on from that yet?

    I've charged every phone I've had overnight and that includes my Note 4 and S7E that both used fast charging. If I diminished my battery capacity by 5% or 10% in the 2 years I used the phone then that is fine with me. I sure as hell won't be nervously hovering over my phone ready to rip it off the charger the second it hits 100%.
    Have to agree. I charged all of my Galaxy phones the same way, plug them when I go to bed and pull them off in the morning sometime. The only one that went through a batter is my wife's Note 4, but she's had it for years now (loves it and won't give it up!). The rest of them hit their 2 year mark with no noticeable degradation of the battery life. My S5 still functions well on the stock battery, I use it every now and then. However, I do turn off fast charging since I'm never in a hurry for it to charge.
    03-23-2017 12:10 PM
  8. LeoRex's Avatar
    I've read so many different opinions that I don't know what to believe
    Don't believe anyone who tells you that leaving a fully charged phone on a charger does nothing... really. Anyone who says so is probably basing that on anecdotal evidence and not on real, lab tested and scientifically proven data.
    03-23-2017 12:14 PM
  9. Daniel Barrett's Avatar
    I might be mistaken but doesn't quick charging stop after 50% charge? After that it's normal charge speed, is it not? Also I have owned Samsung phones since I had my first phone, with the exception of one blackberry, and I don't go a night without charging my phone. Then I charge on my commute to work, and then on my wireless charger at work when I'm not using my phone. I like having my phone fully charged and I have never had an issue.
    03-23-2017 12:22 PM
  10. pappcam's Avatar
    I might be mistaken but doesn't quick charging stop after 50% charge? After that it's normal charge speed, is it not? Also I have owned Samsung phones since I had my first phone, with the exception of one blackberry, and I don't go a night without charging my phone. Then I charge on my commute to work, and then on my wireless charger at work when I'm not using my phone. I like having my phone fully charged and I have never had an issue.
    I don't know of the exact percentage but yes, it doesn't fast charge all the way to 100% I believe.

    You'd think that some people are actually afraid to use their phones because they don't want to wreck them by charging the battery. Even the mod here is in on that action.

    I'm not sure how some people lives work where they can somehow remove the phone from the charger in the middle of the night when it hits 100%.
    03-23-2017 12:33 PM
  11. recDNA's Avatar
    best bet is to shut. phone off at night
    03-23-2017 12:53 PM
  12. hellosailor's Avatar
    "best bet is to shut. phone off at night"
    Works great if you're a civil servant. Not such a good idea when you're the on-call guy and part of keeping your job is occasionally taking emergency calls in the dead of night. You might be surprised to know how many folks are *required* to be available 24x7, at least from time to time. Or even if you simply have family in another time zone, other mundane reasons why you may WANT to be accessible 24x7, at least to some folks.


    You can't really make any absolute statements about chargers, because they are made in many very different ways. Sometimes a pulldown resistor is used in the cable to signal the phone that there is a particular device (the charger) attached. Sometimes the charger itself has the brains.

    In the EU, there are rules about disconnecting chargers once a device is fully charged. So Samsung (idiots) tries to comply by making all of their devices wake up, light up, and chime when they are fully charged. As if I'm going to enjoy being awoken at 2AM to unplug my tablet?

    But there are chargers which will stop the charge once the device has been charged (based on current drawn, I believe) and then turn back on based on different schemes. Heck, every laptop on the market probably offers the same thing, one battery charging mode that keeps the battery at 100% all the time, in case you need to bolt. And a second mode that typically allows the battery to float from 99% to 95% before it turns back on, allowing the battery to cycle fewer times for a longer service life.

    There's no one solution that fits all but you can bet the $5 charger you buy at the gas station or online, is not going to have that kind of smarts.

    And no matter what you do ("It was the best butter!" Lewis Carroll) a battery is still a consumable, disposable device. After two years it is time to replace it, because used or not, it has lost significant capacity. Which means time for a new phone, since the only way you know you're not buying a dangerous counterfeit is to buy it from the phone maker, and that's just too damn expensive.
    Ipse_Tase likes this.
    03-23-2017 12:57 PM
  13. pappcam's Avatar
    best bet is to shut. phone off at night
    Lol. And there we have it. May as well extrapolate that out and say the best bet is to not use the phone at all because you could damage it or degrade it.

    I use my phone as my night stand clock and alarm clock. I use it all day and I charge it overnight. I've always done it and I always will in the future.
    03-23-2017 01:18 PM
  14. recDNA's Avatar
    Not at all! I just mean charge it up and shut it off unless you answer email or phone calls after you go to bed.
    03-23-2017 01:45 PM
  15. dlgus's Avatar
    Verizon told me and my sister you're not supposed to leave your phone plugged in overnight. The rule of thumb is charge your phone to 80 % and deplete the phone to 20%. You're not really supposed to overcharge it because it destroys your battery faster.
    That sounds like the old school charging advice I used to hear back in the old days.
    Personally, in an era where phones cost an arm and a leg, and there is no option to remove/replace batteries, I find it hard to believe that Samsung would deliberately design a phone where the battery life would be significantly diminished by charging.
    OTOH, I would not have believed the N7 debacle, had it not happened to me...
    pappcam likes this.
    03-23-2017 03:12 PM
  16. dlgus's Avatar
    best bet is to shut. phone off at night
    ROTFLMAO
    03-23-2017 03:16 PM
  17. LeoRex's Avatar
    That sounds like the old school charging advice I used to hear back in the old days.
    Personally, in an era where phones cost an arm and a leg, and there is no option to remove/replace batteries, I find it hard to believe that Samsung would deliberately design a phone where the battery life would be significantly diminished by charging.
    Well, Samsung bucks the trend here a bit. Many OEMs, in an effort to get the highest energy density possible, are sourcing batteries that charge to 4.4v.... this is really the upper limit where it is safe for the battery chemistry.... and increases the amount of stress the cell is under at those higher charges.... Not that they are significantly lower, they go to 4.35V, but that 0.05V difference does lead to less stress... but some don't think that is due to longevity, but the face that they have tighter tolerances in their phones to allow for swelling over time (phones often allow for as much as a 10% increase in battery pack size) to shrink their phones a bit.

    It was only a generation or two ago that those cells were charged to around 4.22v... that's why you'll hear people say "I have a phone from 5 years ago that is still holding a pretty good charge but the one I got last year is toast." Yep...
    03-23-2017 03:59 PM
  18. LeePeyton's Avatar
    This post caused me to fall down a rabbit hole of looking Galaxy S7 components, so I created an account. With the S7/S7edge the main PCB board and power PCB board are seperate. The micro-USB does many things looking at how the ribbion cables are routed, one of those things is power to the main board before it hits the battery. An interesting component is the Fairchild FPF2495B Load Switch that's slew rate controlled with adjustable current-limit control. This sets it back to the laptop analogy. So charging your phone, the load switch should know to direct power with a fail over back to the battery when it's no longer getting direct power, just like a laptop. So I would think with it load switching with different power paths they planned ahead since we don't get to switch out batteries. If I am misunderstanding the way this load switch works, I welcome any input.
    07-23-2017 12:15 AM
  19. chanchan05's Avatar
    That sounds like the old school charging advice I used to hear back in the old days.
    Personally, in an era where phones cost an arm and a leg, and there is no option to remove/replace batteries, I find it hard to believe that Samsung would deliberately design a phone where the battery life would be significantly diminished by charging.
    OTOH, I would not have believed the N7 debacle, had it not happened to me...
    It's not deliberate design. It's simply how the lithium ion battery technology works. Samsung actually is researching to get around this. They claim that after around a year of use (approx 300-500 cycles), the lithium ion batteries on the S7 Edge retain 85% of their capacity, while older versions of lithium ion batteries only retain 75% or lower. The new tech on the S8 claims it retains 90% capacity.

    Anyway the gist is, basically, batteries work by ion movement, and like a machine, these ions wear out over time due to use. And similar to machines, heavy use wears them out more. You're more likely to break an engine by running it for 1 day at max rev, than running it over a month at half capacity. The smaller the depth of discharge, the lower the wear. Lab tests have concluded that when you constantly discharge from 100 to 0, it allows you betwrrn 300-500 charge cycles before it starts to break down and not hold charges. More specifically, when you reach that magic number your battery can only hold a fraction of it's original charge (the S7 is said to hold 85%). That's typically 1-2 years of use if you charge once a day. And heavy abusers charge more than once a day, so that decreases the time span to however many weeks it takes them to reach 500 charge cycles. Now, the increase in charge cycles is exponential, not arithmetical. So a depth of discharge to 50 before recharging will not give you 600-1000 charges. Rather it will give you 1200-1500 charge cycles. Mathematically, draining a 3600mah to zero for 300 charges gives you 1080000mah to burn through however short your battery life will be. On the other hand, using only 50% of the battery before recharging gives you 2160000mah to burn through before it expires after at least 1200 charge cycles. In other words, it stored twice more power for you to use. If you say, charge once every 24hrs, going always from 100 to 0 gives you at least 300 days. Recharging twice a day at 50% gives your battery at least 600 days of use before battery capacity deteriorates. Discharging to 75% before recharging actually gives you 2000-2500 charge cycles, making it even longer. Basically the point is, always plug the phone in when given the chance. Don't wait for 50%, or whatever. 40% is an arbitrary number actually, not sure why it's chosen. Also, this is why one of the choices to auto activate power saving in the S7 is at 50%, so that it keeps the battery up as close to 50% as possible when you get the chance to plug in.
    *
    As for charging to 80%, this is because partial charge is better than full charge for lithium ion batteries. The ions are placed on stress to hold charges. Maximum stress is at 100% charge. And like everything else, stuff tends to break more with additional stress. So not running it to 100% all the time will reduce overall stress experienced and increase the time before deterioration occurs. Personally I charge to 90%, and discharge to 40% or above. That's a 50% depth of charge, so that's good for up to 1200-1500 charge cycles, plus whatever number of cycles the decrease in max stress gives me.

    However, note that environmental temperatures also play a role in battery longevity.
    07-23-2017 11:06 AM
  20. ticketbabe2's Avatar
    I've read so many different opinions that I don't know what to believe when it comes to the effects of fast charging and leaving it to charge overnight but I do know that my S6 battery (which was never great to begin with) became utterly terrible after about 16 months. I always used fast charging and regularly kept it plugged in overnight.

    So for my S7e, I will only use fast charging when needed and avoid leaving it plugged in after it reaches 100%.
    I've stopped overnight charging simply for safety on my nightstand. This phone charges so fast on the fast-charger that by the time I brush my teeth & wash my face, it's fully charged.
    07-24-2017 11:07 AM
  21. NexusGirlX's Avatar
    I sometimes leave one of my S7 Edge phones on the charger for a day or two and there has never been any damage. I've also done the same thing with my one month old S8 and my 1.5 year old Note 5.

    Simply put, don't worry about the battery on the wireless charger or while plugged in. No damage will happen.

    Just use your phone and charge it however you want to charge it and you will not ruin the battery.
    brad419 likes this.
    07-24-2017 06:46 PM
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