05-20-2016 01:08 PM
37 12
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  1. pounder001's Avatar
    hahaha,Sorry I am so confused
    05-19-2016 09:13 AM
  2. jakeypride's Avatar
    Do you want us to wow at the fact you've an S7 as a home phone or what? Just plug it out and try it! It doesn't matter what we think, just what actually happens.
    It was the buy one get one, but there was a twist! You needed to set up a new line, so we transferred our home line.
    05-19-2016 09:15 AM
  3. chanchan05's Avatar
    Something tells me this is complete BS mentioned by someone, and then spread around by everyone else. "It just does things for you...the algorithms and stuff...whatever, you won't research it, you'll believe me!"
    You can research it. Over time Android learns which apps to keep loaded onto RAM to open faster and which not to. Basically, it's Windows Superfetch, which they copied from Linux, which exists on Android because Android is Linux. This is why task killers are bad for Android. It registers the reopening of tasks killed as uses, hence why it slows down more as you use task killers more often. Every time an app opens up on Android, it creates a fork from the main process called Zygote. Basically, once you boot up your phone, the Zygote starts and starts loading up basic commonly used processes. Additional processes are forked from this as needed. So every time you kill an app, it's previous Zygote branch still exists and you load another. The more apps you kill, the more branches are formed. The old branches aren't removed because the app was forcibly killed, and the memory release code was not properly executed, hence the shared memory was not released. Since the Zygote is supposed to learn the common processes in use, this creates problems.

    However this is a simplified explanation and as I said, I do not know if power source will have an effect on this process of learning which apps to load on the Zygote. I do not know if the code for Zygote branching takes into account available power levels and such.

    I must admit however that this is what I have pieced together from the tutorials at developer.android.com, a site by Android developers for resources for those who want to develop apps. I did not delve in too much into it, as after some training I decided I simply do not have the time to continue app development full time. This info however has never been refuted by people I know to be app developers when brought up. If you wish to verify my understandings, feel free to do so, and correct me if you feel you have a better understanding of the subject matter after your own review.

    PS. English isn't my first language. Never refuted means never challenged or corrected right?
    Alan Sims likes this.
    05-19-2016 09:28 AM
  4. ABOSWORTH007's Avatar
    You do realize that's inherently impossible if you understood how percentages work and basic math right?
    Haha, I was going to say the same thing. If it's fully charged, that is 100%. How can it be more than 100% charged? Lol
    05-19-2016 06:37 PM
  5. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    IPhones charge to about 108% at full charge and the S7 to about 102% at full charge. Use over the course of several days to figure it out. FYI- I got the 108% stat from the Apple genius bar when having my old iPhone checked for battery issues.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    You do realize that's inherently impossible if you understood how percentages work and basic math right?
    Well, that depends. The battery reports voltage to the phone. The phone reports how charged it is to the user. Each device could define 100% differently. It's possible that the iPhone allows the battery to reach a higher level of charge (higher voltage) before considering it "charged" than the typical Android phone. Not saying that's the case, just that it's possible the charging calibration is different.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-19-2016 09:50 PM
  6. ratsttam's Avatar
    Well, that depends. The battery reports voltage to the phone. The phone reports how charged it is to the user. Each device could define 100% differently. It's possible that the iPhone allows the battery to reach a higher level of charge (higher voltage) before considering it "charged" than the typical Android phone. Not saying that's the case, just that it's possible the charging calibration is different.
    Pretty much spot on there.

    The Android system doesn't necessarily get more efficient, nor does the battery fare better when drained, HOWEVER, the system monitors the full/empty states of the battery, and calibrates the battery %.

    As far as leaving it plugged in for a whole month, no harm, no foul. Modern devices (~10yrs) with Lithium Ion batteries, have circuitry that prevents over charging, which could have explosive results. When it reaches what the circuit says is the batteries max, it stops charging. Usually when it gets down to 97-98% or so, it'll charge back up.

    That sounds like it would be bad... but it's really not, and cumulatively is no different than running your phone down to empty (again the circuits will prevent it from reaching a critical point that will damage the cells).

    In a nutshell, the batteries have a "charge cycle" of 100%. If you use 25% one day, 50% the next, 25% the next, with a full charge in between, that's actually a SINGLE charge cycle. Same with draining it 1% 100 times. or 1 time 100%.

    Don't believe me? The following link from a reputable (although possibly hated company around here) explains it pretty clearly. :-D
    Even though it's from that reputable company, the battery technology is NOT proprietary to them.

    Batteries - Why Lithium-ion? - Apple
    05-20-2016 01:32 AM
  7. chanchan05's Avatar
    Well, that depends. The battery reports voltage to the phone. The phone reports how charged it is to the user. Each device could define 100% differently. It's possible that the iPhone allows the battery to reach a higher level of charge (higher voltage) before considering it "charged" than the typical Android phone. Not saying that's the case, just that it's possible the charging calibration is different.
    That's more understandable. Point still stands though. You can't charge something beyond full capacity.
    05-20-2016 05:00 AM
  8. jneusch's Avatar
    You do realize that's inherently impossible if you understood how percentages work and basic math right?
    You do realize that I am just stating what I was told and read. Besides that, if you ever used an iPhone it makes perfect sense. It may just be a manipulation of how the percentage is displayed.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-20-2016 06:41 AM
  9. TJA3500's Avatar
    I just filled up my coffee cup to 108% this morning and got the breakfast bar all wet!
    BigPuddin likes this.
    05-20-2016 09:22 AM
  10. marlin29311's Avatar
    You do realize that I am just stating what I was told and read. Besides that, if you ever used an iPhone it makes perfect sense. It may just be a manipulation of how the percentage is displayed.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    That's what I was going to say - it's not that the battery is filled to 108% capacity, rather, it's a function of actual vs displayed capacity.
    05-20-2016 11:28 AM
  11. santims's Avatar
    I can't wait for monday.
    05-20-2016 11:33 AM
  12. Gator352's Avatar
    I just filled up my coffee cup to 108% this morning and got the breakfast bar all wet!
    You got the bar all wet? I hope it gave you something back in return. If not, that bar isn't right for you! Lol
    05-20-2016 01:08 PM
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