10-27-2016 08:58 PM
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  1. Robert Boerescu's Avatar
    I love my s7 edge and I wish note 7 worked fine because it was a beautiful phone. I have the dual Sim version. I had to switch to Samsung from G4 because my company emails are working only on galaxy phones but s7 edge is better in many ways compared with G4.
    10-25-2016 08:46 AM
  2. KPMcClave's Avatar
    Crap. I just thought of something.

    I hope they don't recall my wife's S5 before she's due for upgrade at the end of next month.
    Robert Boerescu likes this.
    10-25-2016 09:01 AM
  3. erasat's Avatar
    Yes, I don't want to get blown up... I have kids in this household.
    Then you'll need to buy another device to do phone calls as currently ALL cell phones that you can buy at the moment can explode at any moment as ALL of them use the same Battery type.

    People, S7 edge has been out for about 7+ months and the incidents about this has been just at the same rate than the rest of phones, nothing to worry, nothing abnormal with this. This same mass hysteria was the caused of the second and final recall of the Note 7, and so far, since the exact moment it was officially recalled for good, Have you read about any single additional Note getting fire? Food for thoughts...
    10-25-2016 11:37 AM
  4. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    And... I've seen the same smugness and ridicule from the Note7 forums as I am here...Right up until they pulled the plug... So for some of us maybe the aggravation, or worry could certainly be understandable.
    actually, many of us who are still cheating death daily with our Note 7's are still smug... I just try to be politely smug... :-)

    although I respect other's right to disagree, my opinion was media hype and consumer hysteria. I also believe some of the reports will eventually be found to have people doing everything they can to make them catch fire so they can make a buck.

    It's all about perspective... For example, household appliances are more likely to kill us and our children in a horrifying inferno...

    still can't understand why Apple is not receiving the same attention for their flaming iPhones, either...
    <she says as she looks for her tinfoil hat... ah! there it is! gimme that sucker, I wanna wear it today!>

    reference - Appliance fires - Consumer Reports
    stealthredhead and Bbarbie like this.
    10-25-2016 01:31 PM
  5. Nostromo79's Avatar
    This is how it starts. I have had an S7 Edge since June 17th and it's behaved so well as to be innocuous.
    ToddK likes this.
    10-25-2016 01:31 PM
  6. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    Let's try this one time to put things into perspective.

    There were 2.5 million Note 7s shipped worldwide. Worldwide being North America, Korean and China (with Taiwan, and we can discuss whether Taiwan is China in another thread). The rollout had just started. We don't have any numbers outside of the US, so we will use US statistics that Samsung has acknowledged as being correct.

    The first batch of phones had about 700,000 Note 7 phones in users hands. Samsung says 90% of those were returned. The second batch had between 300,000 and 500,000 phones in user hands. We'll go easy here and round the number higher that it could be and say that's 1,200,000 Note 7 phones in total that were in the hands of people using them in the US. Some people used both the old and the new, and that's counting them twice.

    (note (no pun intended) these sales figures are not publicly stated and were given to me with the understanding that we don't talk about where they came from. But there are other trusted members here at AC who have the same numbers from different sources. I am certain they are true).

    Let's round all the figures so we can make this easy. The point will be exactly the same.

    We had about 100 incidents of "extreme battery failure" out of 1,000,000 phones. That is 0.01%.

    Lets say we had 100 incidents of Galaxy S7 phones. Lets go with the low estimate that 30,000,000 were sold. That is 0.00033%

    We can go one step further because iPhone 6 models have exploded. There were about 100,000,000 of them sold. 100 explosions would be 0.000099%

    All of these are tiny numbers. But the Note 7 has a failure rate that is thousands of times greater than either the Galaxy S7 or the iPhone 6.

    All phones have the potential to explode. Including the one in your pocket right now. The same goes for RC cars, vape pens, smart watches and anything else with a lithium based battery. The tech has an inherent danger. A lot of work has been done to limit the danger, and for the most part it works. But when a product has a rate of failure that wildly outside of the normal range, you can not ignore it.

    Until 10,000 or more Galaxy S7 phones explode, you can't compare the scenario with the Note 7.


    Maybe every Note 7 that didn't explode is perfectly safe. Maybe not. That's not the point. There was something about the phone, whether a manufacturing defect, a software bug (my guess), or bad batteries that made it unsafe in general.

    There is no evidence that the Galaxy S7 or any other Samsung product has the same issue.
    10-25-2016 03:20 PM
  7. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    Thanks for that Jerry. I think nerves are frazzled because of the Note and the media's frenzied handling of the fiasco.

    Thank you and thank AC for not joining in that circus, posting a bunch of exploding phone propaganda without facts to back it up. Some of these other sites I swear..
    Jerry Hildenbrand likes this.
    10-25-2016 03:45 PM
  8. bialy's Avatar
    unless the later production qc and/or later software update have a higher failure rate, that will match the n7 over this month
    10-25-2016 04:10 PM
  9. BOSSY TEXAS CHICK's Avatar
    Agreed and at that point I will be done with Samsung too.
    If S7 Edge gets recalled, Samsung is DONE too... (Sadly, might even be done NOW, quite frankly

    Why would a company want to put out ANY product closely resembling a previous product that was recalled as a fire hazard when there are millions of ppl just waiting for them to misstep, and some even possibly "trying" to make them misstep? Personally, i will be surprised to see ANY New Phone from Samsung (happy, but surprised : )

    BTC
    10-25-2016 04:16 PM
  10. stealthredhead's Avatar
    Let's try this one time to put things into perspective.

    There were 2.5 million Note 7s shipped worldwide. Worldwide being North America, Korean and China (with Taiwan, and we can discuss whether Taiwan is China in another thread). The rollout had just started. We don't have any numbers outside of the US, so we will use US statistics that Samsung has acknowledged as being correct.

    The first batch of phones had about 700,000 Note 7 phones in users hands. Samsung says 90% of those were returned. The second batch had between 300,000 and 500,000 phones in user hands. We'll go easy here and round the number higher that it could be and say that's 1,200,000 Note 7 phones in total that were in the hands of people using them in the US. Some people used both the old and the new, and that's counting them twice.

    (note (no pun intended) these sales figures are not publicly stated and were given to me with the understanding that we don't talk about where they came from. But there are other trusted members here at AC who have the same numbers from different sources. I am certain they are true).

    Let's round all the figures so we can make this easy. The point will be exactly the same.

    We had about 100 incidents of "extreme battery failure" out of 1,000,000 phones. That is 0.01%.

    Lets say we had 100 incidents of Galaxy S7 phones. Lets go with the low estimate that 30,000,000 were sold. That is 0.00033%

    We can go one step further because iPhone 6 models have exploded. There were about 100,000,000 of them sold. 100 explosions would be 0.000099%

    All of these are tiny numbers. But the Note 7 has a failure rate that is thousands of times greater than either the Galaxy S7 or the iPhone 6.

    All phones have the potential to explode. Including the one in your pocket right now. The same goes for RC cars, vape pens, smart watches and anything else with a lithium based battery. The tech has an inherent danger. A lot of work has been done to limit the danger, and for the most part it works. But when a product has a rate of failure that wildly outside of the normal range, you can not ignore it.

    Until 10,000 or more Galaxy S7 phones explode, you can't compare the scenario with the Note 7.


    Maybe every Note 7 that didn't explode is perfectly safe. Maybe not. That's not the point. There was something about the phone, whether a manufacturing defect, a software bug (my guess), or bad batteries that made it unsafe in general.

    There is no evidence that the Galaxy S7 or any other Samsung product has the same issue.
    This.

    (I did the math too using just general sales figures and any reports I could find on incidents and find my critical thinking process at total odds with the hysteria.)
    10-25-2016 04:33 PM
  11. Harry Dunn's Avatar
    Hah just saw this on Fox news.... Here we go!
    10-25-2016 05:44 PM
  12. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    Let's try this one time to put things into perspective.

    There were 2.5 million Note 7s shipped worldwide. Worldwide being North America, Korean and China (with Taiwan, and we can discuss whether Taiwan is China in another thread). The rollout had just started. We don't have any numbers outside of the US, so we will use US statistics that Samsung has acknowledged as being correct.

    The first batch of phones had about 700,000 Note 7 phones in users hands. Samsung says 90% of those were returned. The second batch had between 300,000 and 500,000 phones in user hands. We'll go easy here and round the number higher that it could be and say that's 1,200,000 Note 7 phones in total that were in the hands of people using them in the US. Some people used both the old and the new, and that's counting them twice.

    (note (no pun intended) these sales figures are not publicly stated and were given to me with the understanding that we don't talk about where they came from. But there are other trusted members here at AC who have the same numbers from different sources. I am certain they are true).

    Let's round all the figures so we can make this easy. The point will be exactly the same.

    We had about 100 incidents of "extreme battery failure" out of 1,000,000 phones. That is 0.01%.

    Lets say we had 100 incidents of Galaxy S7 phones. Lets go with the low estimate that 30,000,000 were sold. That is 0.00033%

    We can go one step further because iPhone 6 models have exploded. There were about 100,000,000 of them sold. 100 explosions would be 0.000099%

    All of these are tiny numbers. But the Note 7 has a failure rate that is thousands of times greater than either the Galaxy S7 or the iPhone 6.

    All phones have the potential to explode. Including the one in your pocket right now. The same goes for RC cars, vape pens, smart watches and anything else with a lithium based battery. The tech has an inherent danger. A lot of work has been done to limit the danger, and for the most part it works. But when a product has a rate of failure that wildly outside of the normal range, you can not ignore it.

    Until 10,000 or more Galaxy S7 phones explode, you can't compare the scenario with the Note 7.


    Maybe every Note 7 that didn't explode is perfectly safe. Maybe not. That's not the point. There was something about the phone, whether a manufacturing defect, a software bug (my guess), or bad batteries that made it unsafe in general.

    There is no evidence that the Galaxy S7 or any other Samsung product has the same issue.
    Your logic is flawless... all other things being equal.

    But I don't think all other things are equal...

    That's where my tinfoil hat comes in, and I'm not the only one that is thinking along these lines...

    People nowadays are ridiculously prone to wanting to make a quick buck. I personally believe that a large percentage, maybe even the majority of these "instances" stem from people intentionally dropping/damaging or otherwise attempting to make their phones catch fire or worse... You give me any phone, and I bet you I can figure out a way make it catch fire. I bet any of us could.

    Heck, if I was Apple or LG or Motorola, I'd pay people to do it because the Note 7 was, *IMO* so far ahead of the competition this year that no one else had a chance. What better way to take them down a notch or two...?

    And people, please... Don't think that stuff like this doesn't happen all the time. If you believe that it doesn't, you're crazier than me! LOL

    So, IF true, that "thousands of times more likely" statistic goes up in smoke, doesn't it? (pun intended...)

    So, why do I think this???

    2 reasons...

    1.) Human nature is fallen. People do rotten things like this all the time for money and attention.
    2.) Samsung has really, really smart people. People that make the smartest of us look like Neanderthals. And I'm not saying the folks on here are stupid! Not at all. (I personally have a degree in electronics engineering technology, albeit from some time ago.) The people on here are typically smarter than average by far, IMO. Most people could care less about any of the things we all love talking about here. And they can't reproduce it? I bet they will reproduce it when they start damaging their phones first to get it to happen...

    3.) I do sort of have a weak, 3rd reason... The news media jumped on Sammy hard when there were just a very few incidents... not so much with Apple... jus' sayin'. this is just flat out suspicious to me.

    Anyway, do appreciate your insight and opinions; I share your opinions for the most part... but some aspects of this whole thing just do. not. add. up. to the logical mind. <she adjusts her tinfoil hat once more...>

    I do love the discussion! Thanks!
    10-25-2016 07:20 PM
  13. edubb256's Avatar
    I personally believe that a large percentage, maybe even the majority of these "instances" stem from people intentionally dropping/damaging or otherwise attempting to make their phones catch fire or worse... You give me any phone, and I bet you I can figure out a way make it catch fire. I bet any of us could.
    I agree it is not at all difficult to trigger a thermal runaway (fire) in a phone's lithium-ion battery, on demand. However, it is not that easy to do it in a way that could not be detected by a smart battery engineer conducting an investigation of the cause of the fire. Samsung had a number of the burnt phones that they analyzed. If a significant number were result of damage or sabotage by the consumer, I think Samsung would have caught that in their analysis of the phones. They must have been pretty sure after analyzing the burnt phones, that it was not damage or sabotage by the consumer or they would not have done the recalls.

    But since none of us has any idea what the cause is, we are free to indulge in speculation . Another variation on your theory that I think is more likely is sabotage by an employee, perhaps disgruntled or paid by a competitor to sabotage a couple hundred units. This would make it extremely difficult to identify the cause as the saboteur could have kept the bad units out of the test phase. Samsung has not been able to replicate the problem, perhaps it is because only a small number of units were sabotaged.

    Anyway I obviously have no idea. Given than Samsung is getting back hundreds of thousands to phones to test, they will have ample opportunity to figure out the cause and exactly how widespread it is.
    juliesdroidsync likes this.
    10-25-2016 09:11 PM
  14. Fit24's Avatar
    I understand the concern of some people, but I will continue to use my phone as I normally do.
    juliesdroidsync and ToddK like this.
    10-25-2016 10:08 PM
  15. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    Your logic is flawless... all other things being equal.

    But I don't think all other things are equal...
    But what we think has no bearing on facts.
    juliesdroidsync and ToddK like this.
    10-25-2016 10:29 PM
  16. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    But what we think has no bearing on facts.
    That's kind of my point though... :-) the facts are not in. If they were, this whole story would make a whole lot more sense.

    Put another way, where there's smoke, there's fire... :-) ( sorry, I couldn't resist that one!)

    Only time will tell to see if the story's going to take some interesting turns when all of the facts are in...
    10-25-2016 10:38 PM
  17. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    I agree it is not at all difficult to trigger a thermal runaway (fire) in a phone's lithium-ion battery, on demand. However, it is not that easy to do it in a way that could not be detected by a smart battery engineer conducting an investigation of the cause of the fire. Samsung had a number of the burnt phones that they analyzed. If a significant number were result of damage or sabotage by the consumer, I think Samsung would have caught that in their analysis of the phones. They must have been pretty sure after analyzing the burnt phones, that it was not damage or sabotage by the consumer or they would not have done the recalls.

    But since none of us has any idea what the cause is, we are free to indulge in speculation . Another variation on your theory that I think is more likely is sabotage by an employee, perhaps disgruntled or paid by a competitor to sabotage a couple hundred units. This would make it extremely difficult to identify the cause as the saboteur could have kept the bad units out of the test phase. Samsung has not been able to replicate the problem, perhaps it is because only a small number of units were sabotaged.

    Anyway I obviously have no idea. Given than Samsung is getting back hundreds of thousands to phones to test, they will have ample opportunity to figure out the cause and exactly how widespread it is.
    Maybe, maybe not. If Samsung thought it was sabotage, they had no way to know how many phones were sabotaged and would have gone ahead and done the recall anyway, right?

    And some people were not turning their phones over to Samsung after they caught fire... That is suspicious in and of itself.

    But back to the sabotage Theory... What would they have said? Oh, it's sabotage so we don't have to do a recall!

    No, probably not. As a matter of fact, the fact that they did the recall so quickly and voluntarily kind of makes you wonder if the theory about sabotage was right and they knew it all along.

    But like you said, it's all conjecture. The facts are not all in. I think it's going to be interesting to see how this all plays out. Guess only time will tell.

    Thanks for the input... Love the discussion! Gets my mind off of the election for a while :-)
    edubb256 likes this.
    10-25-2016 10:44 PM
  18. Bbarbie's Avatar
    Two Galaxy S7 edge units have exploded recently. One incident took place in Canada, according to Android Headlines. The other explosion happened to a phone that belonged to an employee of a major US carrier, Phone Arena reports.

    The Canadian unit caught fire while the owner was driving home from work. The other handset exploded while it was charging overnight using the included charger. It’s unclear at this time exactly what caused either of these two explosions.

    Samsung is investigating the fire in Canada, according to Yahoo.

    Found above in a bgr article while many don't like that website.. again just an fyi..
    juliesdroidsync likes this.
    10-25-2016 11:01 PM
  19. KPMcClave's Avatar
    Two Galaxy S7 edge units have exploded recently. One incident took place in Canada, according to Android Headlines. The other explosion happened to a phone that belonged to an employee of a major US carrier, Phone Arena reports.

    The Canadian unit caught fire while the owner was driving home from work. The other handset exploded while it was charging overnight using the included charger. It’s unclear at this time exactly what caused either of these two explosions.

    Samsung is investigating the fire in Canada, according to Yahoo.

    Found above in a bgr article while many don't like that website.. again just an fyi..
    ...and the rest of the article there says just about exactly the same thing people have been saying in this thread. That you shouldn't freak out, and that any phone can potentially catch fire and the S7E isn't doing that at a rate that should be a concern compared to any other phone.

    New Galaxy S7 edge explosions reported | BGR
    10-26-2016 05:53 AM
  20. amyf27's Avatar
    I'm sorry but I'm highly skeptical about any of these reports.
    10-26-2016 06:35 AM
  21. Bbarbie's Avatar
    No I fully agree at this point I feel these reports are pure sabotage and Samsung hasn't found the rat yet.
    juliesdroidsync likes this.
    10-26-2016 08:53 AM
  22. LeoRex's Avatar
    No, probably not. As a matter of fact, the fact that they did the recall so quickly and voluntarily kind of makes you wonder if the theory about sabotage was right and they knew it all along.

    But like you said, it's all conjecture. The facts are not all in. I think it's going to be interesting to see how this all plays out. Guess only time will tell.

    Thanks for the input... Love the discussion! Gets my mind off of the election for a while :-)
    There is absolutely zero evidence of any sabotage, subterfuge, malfeasance or rapscallionry anywhere in this story. I'm applying Occam's Razor... Company releases a faulty product, all hell breaks loose, and through some combination of pressure to act fast/decisive and the hubris of being sure they found any and all problems, release a replacement product that still happens to fail. There was no media plot, or unnecessary recall launch to appease the public. Stuff happens sometimes. Now, back to the S7 Edge... like Jerry points out, the S7 has been around for going on 8 months now, and there have been failures, like there have been iPhone failures, Tesla failures, etc.. Note 7 fans can't point to sporadic stories of S7 or iPhone failures as justification that their phones' safety was overblown... doing so is a simple case of false equivalence.
    juliesdroidsync and KPMcClave like this.
    10-26-2016 09:43 AM
  23. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    There is absolutely zero evidence of any sabotage, subterfuge, malfeasance or rapscallionry anywhere in this story. I'm applying Occam's Razor... Company releases a faulty product, all hell breaks loose, and through some combination of pressure to act fast/decisive and the hubris of being sure they found any and all problems, release a replacement product that still happens to fail. There was no media plot, or unnecessary recall launch to appease the public. Stuff happens sometimes. Now, back to the S7 Edge... like Jerry points out, the S7 has been around for going on 8 months now, and there have been failures, like there have been iPhone failures, Tesla failures, etc.. Note 7 fans can't point to sporadic stories of S7 or iPhone failures as justification that their phones' safety was overblown... doing so is a simple case of false equivalence.
    Only time will tell... maybe there's no evidence today, but that may not be the case a week or a month from now. :-) you make a good point though.
    10-26-2016 09:47 AM
  24. Jerry Hildenbrand's Avatar
    That's kind of my point though... :-) the facts are not in.
    So much for a rational conversation.

    Hard numbers and math are facts. Neither of those will change. I'm just glad Samsung accepts responsibility better than this.
    10-26-2016 11:44 AM
  25. juliesdroidsync's Avatar
    So much for a rational conversation.

    Hard numbers and math are facts. Neither of those will change. I'm just glad Samsung accepts responsibility better than this.
    I guess it would have been better for me to say, "Time will tell if all the facts are in." You seem supremely confident that they are! If they are, no one can argue with your logic.

    (And I don't think Samsung would get off the hook regardless of the cause, btw... it's still their phone. Fault and responsibility are not the same thing, after all. Regardless of who/what is at fault, it is still their responsibility - no getting around that.)

    ...so much for an open-minded conversation... <deep sigh>
    edubb256 likes this.
    10-26-2016 03:48 PM
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