1. xmostwanted559x's Avatar
    I just got the Edge today and so far I like it. My note 4 was getting laggy and unstable even with reboots. So I had to change, I didn't own the s6 but with non removable batteries, are they made better? My note 4 went through like a battery a year.
    12-14-2016 01:39 AM
  2. chanchan05's Avatar
    Depends entirely on how you use it. My Note still has the original battery after almost 4 years and still lasts over a day in standby. They just found out how to make bigger batteries smaller, but the technology is basically the same still. Fot a battery to last more than 1 year, it's up to the user on how abusive he gets.
    12-14-2016 01:42 AM
  3. xmostwanted559x's Avatar
    I use it hard, no one was able to figure out why my note was rebooting lagging freezing and not usable so I had to change. I couldn't wait for the s8 or note 8.

    What happens to S6 users when their battery dies?
    12-14-2016 01:48 AM
  4. chanchan05's Avatar
    Running the battery down to zero reduces battery life and charging capacity.

    S6 users make like iPhone users. Take it to a repair center and have the battery replaced.
    libra89 likes this.
    12-14-2016 03:30 AM
  5. Nakrohtap's Avatar
    That's what you have insurance for. Not sure how much a battery replacement costs, but if done incorrectly,you're asking for more problems. Usually, the batteries should last several years with no noticeable issues.
    12-14-2016 05:20 AM
  6. Lepa79's Avatar
    Running the battery down to zero reduces battery life and charging capacity.

    S6 users make like iPhone users. Take it to a repair center and have the battery replaced.
    What are charging best practices? Like charge when down to 40% back up to 80% and why would that be better?
    12-14-2016 06:41 AM
  7. chanchan05's Avatar
    I used to have a long post with a detailed technical explanation but lost it.

    Anyway the gist is, basically, batteries work by ion movement, and like a machine, these ions wear out over time due to use. And similar to machines, heavy use wears them out more. You're more likely to break an engine by running it for 1 day at max rev, than running it over a month at half capacity. The smaller the depth of discharge, the lower the wear. Lab tests have concluded that when you constantly discharge from 100 to 0, it allows you betwrrn 300-500 charge cycles before it starts to break down and not hold charges. More specifically, when you reach that magic number your battery can only hold 75% of it's original charge. That's typically 1-2 years of use if you charge once a day. And heavy abusers charge more than once a day, so that decreases the time span to however many weeks it takes them to reach 500 charge cycles. Now, the increase in charge cycles is exponential, not arithmetical. So a depth of discharge to 50 before recharging will not give you 600-1000 charges. Rather it will give you 1200-1500 charge cycles. Mathematically, draining a 3600mah to zero for 300 charges gives you 1080000mah to burn through however short your battery life will be. On the other hand, using only 50% of the battery before recharging gives you 2160000mah to burn through before it expires after at least 1200 charge cycles. In other words, it stored twice more power for you to use. If you say, charge once every 24hrs, going always from 100 to 0 gives you at least 300 days. Recharging twice a day at 50% gives your battery at least 600 days of use before battery capacity deteriorates noticeably. Discharging to 75% before recharging actually gives you 2000-2500 charge cycles, making it even longer. Basically the point is, always plug the phone in when given the chance. Don't wait for 50%, or whatever. 40% is an arbitrary number actually, not sure why it's chosen. Also, this is why one of the choices to auto activate power saving in the S7 is at 50%, so that it keeps the battery up as close to 50% as possible when you get the chance to plug in.

    As for charging to 80%, this is because partial charge is better than full charge for lithium ion batteries. The ions are placed on stress to hold charges. Maximum stress is at 100% charge. And like everything else, stuff tends to break more. So not running it to 100% all the time will reduce overall stress experienced and increase the time before deterioration occurs. Personally I charge to 90%, and discharge to 40% or above. That's a 50% depth of charge, so that's good for up to 1500 charge cycles, plus whatever number of cycles the decrease in max stress gives me.

    However, note that environmental temperatures also play a role in battery longevity.
    dm3ready and libra89 like this.
    12-14-2016 07:28 AM
  8. Lepa79's Avatar
    I used to have a long post with a detailed technical explanation but lost it.

    Anyway the gist is, basically, batteries work by ion movement, and like a machine, these ions wear out over time due to use. And similar to machines, heavy use wears them out more. You're more likely to break an engine by running it for 1 day at max rev, than running it over a month at half capacity. The smaller the depth of discharge, the lower the wear. Lab tests have concluded that when you constantly discharge from 100 to 0, it allows you betwrrn 300-500 charge cycles before it starts to break down and not hold charges. More specifically, when you reach that magic number your battery can only hold 75% of it's original charge. That's typically 1-2 years of use if you charge once a day. And heavy abusers charge more than once a day, so that decreases the time span to however many weeks it takes them to reach 500 charge cycles. Now, the increase in charge cycles is exponential, not arithmetical. So a depth of discharge to 50 before recharging will not give you 600-1000 charges. Rather it will give you 1200-1500 charge cycles. Mathematically, draining a 3600mah to zero for 300 charges gives you 1080000mah to burn through however short your battery life will be. On the other hand, using only 50% of the battery before recharging gives you 2160000mah to burn through before it expires after at least 1200 charge cycles. In other words, it stored twice more power for you to use. If you say, charge once every 24hrs, going always from 100 to 0 gives you at least 300 days. Recharging twice a day at 50% gives your battery at least 600 days of use before battery capacity deteriorates noticeably. Discharging to 75% before recharging actually gives you 2000-2500 charge cycles, making it even longer. Basically the point is, always plug the phone in when given the chance. Don't wait for 50%, or whatever. 40% is an arbitrary number actually, not sure why it's chosen. Also, this is why one of the choices to auto activate power saving in the S7 is at 50%, so that it keeps the battery up as close to 50% as possible when you get the chance to plug in.

    As for charging to 80%, this is because partial charge is better than full charge for lithium ion batteries. The ions are placed on stress to hold charges. Maximum stress is at 100% charge. And like everything else, stuff tends to break more. So not running it to 100% all the time will reduce overall stress experienced and increase the time before deterioration occurs. Personally I charge to 90%, and discharge to 40% or above. That's a 50% depth of charge, so that's good for up to 1500 charge cycles, plus whatever number of cycles the decrease in max stress gives me.

    However, note that environmental temperatures also play a role in battery longevity.
    Thanks for taking the time to write all this. Good stuff!
    12-14-2016 08:46 AM
  9. Dngrsone's Avatar
    My S4 has lasted two years on its battery (yes it's replaceable), and I had to charge it twice daily because of crazy coverage by my service combined with all-metal buildings caused it to work hard.

    My Galaxy Tab 4 has non-user-replaceable batteries and is four years old, and the batteries are just fine, though I only charge it every other day (I obviously don't use it all day and it has a big battery).

    As long as you are reasonable with battery use and charging, I think your battery will be fine until you upgrade.
    12-14-2016 10:16 AM
  10. xmostwanted559x's Avatar
    Yeah my note 4 always ran down to like 10% by time I'm done with work. So it's better to try charge above 50%? I'll need to do this so I don't have pay to buy a new battery install
    12-14-2016 11:28 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD