1. bIOforger's Avatar
    Battery experts tend to dumb down information for the lowest common denominator.

    What matters, is the depth of charge per cycle. All this talk about what percentages to charge to is just nonsense ... Well maybe not nonsense, but it's just phrased in a way to make the layman have simple guidlines to follow.

    You're not ruining your battery by charging from 70% to 100%, that's complete bs.
    Exactly!
    brad419 likes this.
    04-16-2018 01:50 PM
  2. bIOforger's Avatar
    It also depends on how many charge cycles you've done. There's also the temperatures and other things like that to consider. These things are counted by charge cycles, not by days. Someone who runs their battery down to 15% twice in one day burns through their charge cycles faster than someone who charges every other day.
    Yea, i get it but i hammered those phones, charging wise, especially the s7edge. According to the internet the batt should be wasted, but it wasn't thats all i'm saying. And it's not just me, i know quite a lot of people following the same upgrade path as me, who've had zero issues with previous phones and probably had even worse charging habits
    04-16-2018 01:53 PM
  3. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Battery experts tend to dumb down information for the lowest common denominator.

    What matters, is the depth of charge per cycle. All this talk about what percentages to charge to is just nonsense ... Well maybe not nonsense, but it's just phrased in a way to make the layman have simple guidlines to follow.

    You're not ruining your battery by charging from 70% to 100%, that's complete bs.
    Again, going back to the Battery University article linked in post #4 of this thread, you'd see where they demonstrated that, on average, charging to 100% will result in less long term usability. There's really nothing to dumb down about it.

    Of course that doesn't mean fully charging to 100% will kill a battery on the first shot, but doing so repeatedly will cause excess stress and degradation. This is also why new Li-ion batteries at shipped with a partial charge. If they charged to 100% at the factory, a large number of them would be toast after sitting on the shelves waiting to be sold.
    Morty2264 likes this.
    04-16-2018 02:23 PM
  4. Ryza321's Avatar
    dropping a phone from 20 meters is not good for it
    In fact it is unusable..but it turn on, just the screen is devastated
    Itsa_Me_Mario likes this.
    04-16-2018 05:00 PM
  5. applejosh's Avatar
    I charge my phone whenever I need to. I try not to worry about charging to higher than "optimal" levels or such. I just use my phone and not fret over the specifics. I know batteries degrade over time/use, but I don't obsess over it. Use your phone as you need to and charge when you feel you need to.
    bIOforger, Ryza321, r511 and 3 others like this.
    04-19-2018 08:21 AM
  6. frellingfrakker's Avatar
    As much as I'd like to optimize my phone's battery by monitoring all this I just don't have the time. I use it all day then plug it in at night so it get's charged to 100% every day. If it's a heavy day and needs to be topped off during the day I have chargers in my car and at work. I would drive myself crazy if I worried about plugging in my phone every time it got down to xx% and making sure to unplug it before it got up to xx%.
    bIOforger, Ryza321 and brad419 like this.
    04-19-2018 08:24 AM
  7. chanchan05's Avatar
    As much as I'd like to optimize my phone's battery by monitoring all this I just don't have the time. I use it all day then plug it in at night so it get's charged to 100% every day. If it's a heavy day and needs to be topped off during the day I have chargers in my car and at work. I would drive myself crazy if I worried about plugging in my phone every time it got down to xx% and making sure to unplug it before it got up to xx%.
    Personally the optimization part above 80% in my opinion is miniscule. The more important bit is not discharging it below 30-40%. There are apps that you can set to alert you of your battery percentage through a notification sound if it comes to that.
    Itsa_Me_Mario likes this.
    04-19-2018 08:35 AM
  8. mwake4goten's Avatar
    I agree to a point, but I think actual usage patterns has more of an impact than how you charge/discharge the phone. If you are a heavy user, ie games, videos, etc and are constantly draining and charging your phone at least twice a day then no matter what tactic you use you will kill the battery quickly long term wise. Sure, using the advised battery charging techniques will give you more charge cycles overall but actual phone usage patterns for me determines the long term life of the battery more than adhering to advised battery draining/charging techniques.

    I wish companies would give me the choice of a phone with our without a removable batteries instead of 'plus' versions OR make it an option of a plus version....I don't know why we can't have slightly thicker phones and/or removable batteries. Then we could stock up on extra batteries and use or phones to our hearts content without having to worry about the long term battery life as much.
    05-14-2018 03:29 PM
  9. lucianus_luciferus's Avatar
    Because the phone companies want us to buy a new phone every year.
    I agree to a point, but I think actual usage patterns has more of an impact than how you charge/discharge the phone. If you are a heavy user, ie games, videos, etc and are constantly draining and charging your phone at least twice a day then no matter what tactic you use you will kill the battery quickly long term wise. Sure, using the advised battery charging techniques will give you more charge cycles overall but actual phone usage patterns for me determines the long term life of the battery more than adhering to advised battery draining/charging techniques.

    I wish companies would give me the choice of a phone with our without a removable batteries instead of 'plus' versions OR make it an option of a plus version....I don't know why we can't have slightly thicker phones and/or removable batteries. Then we could stock up on extra batteries and use or phones to our hearts content without having to worry about the long term battery life as much.
    mwake4goten likes this.
    05-14-2018 03:44 PM
  10. mwake4goten's Avatar
    Because the phone companies want us to buy a new phone every year.
    Thing is I would pay to play....I would pay an extra $100 if they made it a premium feature. The built in battery could be the cheaper economy model, that way those who couldn't afford the expensive model would have to get the cheaper built in one. Those who could afford the more expensive one could get the removable battery version and smart phone companies can still make up their profits by making selling batteries.

    Maybe the cheaper model would have less features including lower class Qualcomm chipset and amongst other things. What the premium version would be full featured no compromise but with a removable battery. If they were smart about the pricing on this this could work... smartphone profits are dropping around the world so they need to do something.
    05-15-2018 06:43 AM
  11. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    Thing is I would pay to play....I would pay an extra $100 if they made it a premium feature. The built in battery could be the cheaper economy model, that way those who couldn't afford the expensive model would have to get the cheaper built in one. Those who could afford the more expensive one could get the removable battery version and smart phone companies can still make up their profits by making selling batteries.

    Maybe the cheaper model would have less features including lower class Qualcomm chipset and amongst other things. What the premium version would be full featured no compromise but with a removable battery. If they were smart about the pricing on this this could work... smartphone profits are dropping around the world so they need to do something.
    I feel like the majority of the market looks at phones with a removable battery as not premium. If anything, they'd probably do it the other way around. It seems more premium materials are used now that backs don't need to be removable. Also, you paying an extra 100 for a removable battery is nothing compared to the amount they make from you having to upgrade earlier so it likely doesn't make economical sense for them.
    05-15-2018 12:36 PM
  12. Rukbat's Avatar
    The reason for the non-removable battery isn't mainly to get us to buy new phones - most manufacturers don't charge that much to replace batteries (okay, the $10 battery replacement is a thing of the past). But they can be shaped to fit into almost any available space in the phone, so if they have an L-shaped space or a Z-shaped space, a battery can be made that will fit that space. It can also be made to wrap around the motherboard, etc. Replacing a battery like that requires a lot of experience and, sometimes, special jigs. But it helps make a thinner, lighter phone. That's what we all want, right? Thinner, lighter, longer-lasting battery and cheaper. We got the first two. (My V551 battery - from 2004 - is still good, but the phone wasn't light or thin for its time, and the 900mAh battery [if I remember right] was over $30 store cost. That would be a 100 2004 dollar battery today (for 3000mAh), or maybe $150. Having the non-replaceable battery replaced is cheaper.)
    05-15-2018 01:31 PM
  13. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I feel like the majority of the market looks at phones with a removable battery as not premium. If anything, they'd probably do it the other way around.
    These are also probably the same types of people that scratch their heads trying to figure out what software update causes their phone to shut off at 30%. It seems that more and more people don't understand that batteries can and do go bad. I'm ok with them paying a little "stupid tax."


    But they can be shaped to fit into almost any available space in the phone, so if they have an L-shaped space or a Z-shaped space, a battery can be made that will fit that space. It can also be made to wrap around the motherboard, etc.
    Show me one of these batteries in use and I'll start to consider this a valid argument. If there's one thing my education in mechanical drafting and printed circuit board design taught me, it's you don't over complicate the design. Oddball shaped batteries would add additional costs as well, negating any potential savings from an engineer that was too lazy to keep the designs simple or simply looking to be extravagant.
    05-15-2018 04:41 PM
  14. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    These are also probably the same types of people that scratch their heads trying to figure out what software update causes their phone to shut off at 30%. It seems that more and more people don't understand that batteries can and do go bad. I'm ok with them paying a little "stupid tax."




    Show me one of these batteries in use and I'll start to consider this a valid argument. If there's one thing my education in mechanical drafting and printed circuit board design taught me, it's you don't over complicate the design. Oddball shaped batteries would add additional costs as well, negating any potential savings from an engineer that was too lazy to keep the designs simple or simply looking to be extravagant.
    You're right. They're one and the same lol. I'm just glad I don't keep my phones long enough for it to matter. That's the next person's problem.
    05-15-2018 04:43 PM
  15. dov1978's Avatar
    Personally I don't need to be thinking about stopping my phone charging before it gets to 100%. Mine gets plugged in whenever I'm near a charger for a top up and whenever I'm driving (at least 4hrs a day) it's kept charging even when it's full. Rarely does my battery get below 10% thanks to it being 4000mA. I switch phones before it even gets to 6 months old so I guess it's snot something I really need to worry about anyway.

    I do kinda like the feature added to iOS that shows you how healthy your battery is regarding the percentage charging potential from new. I'd quite like to see Android adopt that
    mwake4goten and mumfoau like this.
    05-15-2018 04:58 PM
  16. chanchan05's Avatar
    Personally I don't need to be thinking about stopping my phone charging before it gets to 100%. Mine gets plugged in whenever I'm near a charger for a top up and whenever I'm driving (at least 4hrs a day) it's kept charging even when it's full. Rarely does my battery get below 10% thanks to it being 4000mA. I switch phones before it even gets to 6 months old so I guess it's snot something I really need to worry about anyway.

    I do kinda like the feature added to iOS that shows you how healthy your battery is regarding the percentage charging potential from new. I'd quite like to see Android adopt that
    While it's not yet built in, you can get the charge cycles app for that.
    dov1978 likes this.
    05-16-2018 03:16 AM
  17. mumfoau's Avatar

    I do kinda like the feature added to iOS that shows you how healthy your battery is regarding the percentage charging potential from new. I'd quite like to see Android adopt that
    That would be good!
    12-03-2018 09:56 AM
  18. mwake4goten's Avatar
    I had the Note 5 from when it was launched.
    I used it every single day all day long putting it on the charger as often as I could. Even leaving it on the charger every night.

    I never had any issues with battery life, fast draining or anything. It was solid until I finally got my S9 Plus.
    Just wondering when you said "it was solid" what's your definition of that? What was your usage pattern, heavy, medium, light user? My wife had the note 5 still on active duty and she charges it wirelessly with no attention to battery care and she gets about 2 to 3 hours of SOT time but I do would say she is a medium/light user. And the phone drains on its own quickly on standby. However I agree with others that battery technology has improved and it also depends on the manufacturer. Some companies are suspected to use very cheap batteries eg HTC whilst others Samsung and LG use better higher quality ones.
    Yesterday 08:57 AM
  19. mwake4goten's Avatar
    What was your usage pattern, heavy, medium or light? All this makes a difference to long term battery degradation levels.
    Probably user error how come my 2yr+ s7edge had a record uptime and almost 6hrs of screen on time when i sold it then? Also my previous S5 was very similar, also 2yrs old, batt life was just as a good as when it was new.
    Yesterday 09:01 AM
  20. mwake4goten's Avatar
    Here's the thing, I'd rather an uglier beefier phone that was easier for the manufacturer to put a removable battery in. Many of us put cases that uglify the the phones any way or at least hide the beauty of the phone so what's the point of making so much effort to seal the battery in?

    The LG V20 was proof that you can have your cake and eat it. Good looks and a removable battery.
    The reason for the non-removable battery isn't mainly to get us to buy new phones - most manufacturers don't charge that much to replace batteries (okay, the $10 battery replacement is a thing of the past). But they can be shaped to fit into almost any available space in the phone, so if they have an L-shaped space or a Z-shaped space, a battery can be made that will fit that space. It can also be made to wrap around the motherboard, etc. Replacing a battery like that requires a lot of experience and, sometimes, special jigs. But it helps make a thinner, lighter phone. That's what we all want, right? Thinner, lighter, longer-lasting battery and cheaper. We got the first two. (My V551 battery - from 2004 - is still good, but the phone wasn't light or thin for its time, and the 900mAh battery [if I remember right] was over $30 store cost. That would be a 100 2004 dollar battery today (for 3000mAh), or maybe $150. Having the non-replaceable battery replaced is cheaper.)
    Yesterday 09:11 AM
  21. mwake4goten's Avatar
    I've stopped using quick charge too, as I want to prolong the life of my phone battery. I charge using USB of my computer, sure it takes longer but it's less stressful for the battery. Quick charge isn't the best thing to do if you are concerned with long term longevity. For one it adds heat which is the enemy of long term battery life. I charge to 80% using USB on computer and let it go to 30% - 40%. But then I can afford to do that as I have a great phone with the LG V30 which is very efficient and I am a light to medium user. If I was a heavy user then it wouldn't be practical to charge by USB as it would take too long.

    But at least battery companies could build in software into the charging hardware that stopped the phone charging at certain levels. Laptops have had this technology for years and they use the same types of batteries!
    Yesterday 09:21 AM
  22. chanchan05's Avatar
    Here's the thing, I'd rather an uglier beefier phone that was easier for the manufacturer to put a removable battery in. Many of us put cases that uglify the the phones any way or at least hide the beauty of the phone so what's the point of making so much effort to seal the battery in?

    The LG V30 was proof that you can have your cake and eat it. Good looks and a removable battery.
    The V30 did not have a removable battery.
    Yesterday 06:54 PM
  23. mwake4goten's Avatar
    The V30 did not have a removable battery.
    Edited that thanks! I meant the V20 lol
    Yesterday 07:28 PM
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