1. flyingkytez's Avatar


    What do you guys think? The phone tested in the test was a Samsung Galaxy. Do you guys limit your phone usage? Wireless Bluetooth use? Thoughts?
    06-29-2018 01:22 PM
  2. ABOSWORTH007's Avatar
    I started putting my phone in airplane mode at night when it's next to my bed and I'm sleeping. That way the alarm still works but at least it's not connected to anything while I'm sleeping and don't need it. Time will tell if these concerns are valid. I tend to think they are a hit overblown but I haven't done enough research on it to make a solid claim.
    zipro likes this.
    06-29-2018 01:31 PM
  3. dpham00's Avatar
    I started putting my phone in airplane mode at night when it's next to my bed and I'm sleeping. That way the alarm still works but at least it's not connected to anything while I'm sleeping and don't need it. Time will tell if these concerns are valid. I tend to think they are a hit overblown but I haven't done enough research on it to make a solid claim.
    you won't get any emergency calls... Though that's not important to you then sure. That's an option
    06-29-2018 03:10 PM
  4. ABOSWORTH007's Avatar
    you won't get any emergency calls... Though that's not important to you then sure. That's an option
    I know. I personally dont mind that.
    06-29-2018 03:14 PM
  5. dpham00's Avatar


    What do you guys think? The phone tested in the test was a Samsung Galaxy. Do you guys limit your phone usage? Wireless Bluetooth use? Thoughts?
    Not really worried. I see signs on so many items saying that they can cause cancer. Just learn to live with it.

    The government has an obligation to it's citizens to limit exposure if it is really that bad and based on what the guy from the Canadian government said, I am not worried
    06-29-2018 03:14 PM
  6. flyingkytez's Avatar
    I started putting my phone in airplane mode at night when it's next to my bed and I'm sleeping. That way the alarm still works but at least it's not connected to anything while I'm sleeping and don't need it. Time will tell if these concerns are valid. I tend to think they are a hit overblown but I haven't done enough research on it to make a solid claim.
    I keep my phone on Airplane mode sometimes, I leave my phone on at night but turn off data and WiFi. I try to keep it from a distance when I'm sleeping. Bluetooth is a concern for me so I don't use it often.
    06-29-2018 06:42 PM
  7. cert15z's Avatar
    I always use bluetooth, I do keep my phone in my pocket most of the work day
    06-29-2018 08:18 PM
  8. chanchan05's Avatar
    If we're talking radiation, cellphones are the least of my worries. At work I'm exposed to various radiation like from CTs, radiotherapy isotopes etc. Of course I wear protective gear but meh. Lol. Cellphones are miniscule compared to that.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    06-30-2018 06:01 AM
  9. Rukbat's Avatar
    Cellphones don't produce ionizing radiation, so they can't produce cancer by that route (radiation). Electromagnetic radiation? We've been surrounded by it since life began. Lightning, Earth's magnetic field (which protects us from harmful solar radiation, which can cause cancer), piezo-electricity, etc., etc. 4..2 billion years of it. If it was harmful at one time, we've evolved to not be affected by it.

    The stuff you see (like the guy who had an MRI of a tumor) never shows any direct causation from cellphone radiation, and correlation is not causation. (I used two way radio, transmitting a lot more power than a cellphone, for decades before I had a skin cancer lesion removed. But I also smoked all that time - and the lesion was right where the smoke flowed up mu cheek from my mouth. Which is the causation, and which is the correlation?) If radio frequencies caused cancer, we'd have at least a few thousand NYC police officers in the hospital - the antenna is right at their face.

    "Cellphones cause cancer" is a lot like anti-vaxxing. It makes headlines, it gives otherwise-lost-for-a-story reporters something to make a video about, it makes headlines - but at least there used to be a scientific reason that some vaccinations were dangerous (thimerisol, even though the type of mercury used is easily and quickly eliminated from the human body, hasn't been used in vaccines in 17 years). There's never been any evidence that radio frequency energy, at least at the levels produced by equipment you can carry, has ever produced any cancer. It produces heat. That's what diathermy is - RF applied to the part of the body that needs the deep heating it provides. In large enough amounts (like 600 Watts), it can produce burns. (I still carry a scar from having some ***** key a transmitter that was modified to not be able to be keyed while I was working on the antenna a few miles away.) But that's it, a burn that I forgot about half an hour later, and by a signal caused by a transmitter in a cabinet that was 6 feet high and 12"X24" - not something you'd carry in your pocket.

    But people will keep repeating scare stories, and there's nothing we can do about it. (I carry my cellphone on my hip, have for years, and I'm not worrying about it. (And for those who don't use the metric system all the time, do you understand what 15mm is? It's 0.63 inches - a little over half an inch. Direct from the cellphone to your skin, not through some fabric that may have some metallic component (which would be a complete shield).

    crt15z, you do realize that that Bluetooth earphone, right up tight against your ear, is also radiating RF energy right into your ear, right?

    Chanchan, does the PHS still do blood tests every few weeks for people working with radioactive isotopes, or do they consider the dosimeters safe enough? (We used to get blood drawn every two weeks by those vampires when I was working with Radium D+E. Go through the vein, then pull back until the blood flowed - and you continued leaking out of the unplugged hole. Talk about shocky.)
    06-30-2018 02:16 PM
  10. chanchan05's Avatar
    Chanchan, does the PHS still do blood tests every few weeks for people working with radioactive isotopes, or do they consider the dosimeters safe enough? (We used to get blood drawn every two weeks by those vampires when I was working with Radium D+E. Go through the vein, then pull back until the blood flowed - and you continued leaking out of the unplugged hole. Talk about shocky.)
    I live in Asia, so protocol may be different. I don't get exposed THAT regularly though. It's occasional enough not to warrant testing. Maybe once in every two months I'm exposed but considering the difference that cellphone exposure over a year doesn't even match the amount of radiation you are exposed to in Xrays and CT, you get my drift.
    When I was in the Cardiovascular OR (basically we had mobile X-ray in the room and we took shots after every motion), we had these little thingies that measures the amount of radiation we've been exposed to. We wear them outside our lead gowns. They never reached warning levels for me anyway.
    06-30-2018 08:34 PM
  11. Morty2264's Avatar
    I think the effect is negligible. I don't worry about it. That said, I don't keep my phone in my pocket or on my person (it's in a purse normally, or on a hard surface). I think it's one of those things where you don't worry too much about it; but you still don't push it, you know?
    06-30-2018 09:49 PM
  12. PapaGary's Avatar
    06-30-2018 10:28 PM
  13. Mr Segundus's Avatar


    What do you guys think? The phone tested in the test was a Samsung Galaxy. Do you guys limit your phone usage? Wireless Bluetooth use? Thoughts?
    It's all woo. Cell phone signals work on radio waves. Radio waves don't cause cancer. This should be the end of it.
    06-30-2018 11:00 PM
  14. Mr Segundus's Avatar
    "Cellphones cause cancer" is a lot like anti-vaxxing.
    This. This myth that cell phones cause cancer are spread around by bored housewives with a blog who make wild assertions without any evidence and it seeps into the mainstream.
    06-30-2018 11:04 PM
  15. davidnc's Avatar


    What do you guys think? The phone tested in the test was a Samsung Galaxy. Do you guys limit your phone usage? Wireless Bluetooth use? Thoughts?
    Not worried about that hype.
    07-01-2018 12:42 PM
  16. Itsa_Me_Mario's Avatar
    Cellphones don't produce ionizing radiation, so they can't produce cancer by that route (radiation). Electromagnetic radiation? We've been surrounded by it since life began. Lightning, Earth's magnetic field (which protects us from harmful solar radiation, which can cause cancer), piezo-electricity, etc., etc. 4..2 billion years of it. If it was harmful at one time, we've evolved to not be affected by it.

    The stuff you see (like the guy who had an MRI of a tumor) never shows any direct causation from cellphone radiation, and correlation is not causation. (I used two way radio, transmitting a lot more power than a cellphone, for decades before I had a skin cancer lesion removed. But I also smoked all that time - and the lesion was right where the smoke flowed up mu cheek from my mouth. Which is the causation, and which is the correlation?) If radio frequencies caused cancer, we'd have at least a few thousand NYC police officers in the hospital - the antenna is right at their face.

    "Cellphones cause cancer" is a lot like anti-vaxxing. It makes headlines, it gives otherwise-lost-for-a-story reporters something to make a video about, it makes headlines - but at least there used to be a scientific reason that some vaccinations were dangerous (thimerisol, even though the type of mercury used is easily and quickly eliminated from the human body, hasn't been used in vaccines in 17 years). There's never been any evidence that radio frequency energy, at least at the levels produced by equipment you can carry, has ever produced any cancer. It produces heat. That's what diathermy is - RF applied to the part of the body that needs the deep heating it provides. In large enough amounts (like 600 Watts), it can produce burns. (I still carry a scar from having some ***** key a transmitter that was modified to not be able to be keyed while I was working on the antenna a few miles away.) But that's it, a burn that I forgot about half an hour later, and by a signal caused by a transmitter in a cabinet that was 6 feet high and 12"X24" - not something you'd carry in your pocket.

    But people will keep repeating scare stories, and there's nothing we can do about it. (I carry my cellphone on my hip, have for years, and I'm not worrying about it. (And for those who don't use the metric system all the time, do you understand what 15mm is? It's 0.63 inches - a little over half an inch. Direct from the cellphone to your skin, not through some fabric that may have some metallic component (which would be a complete shield).

    crt15z, you do realize that that Bluetooth earphone, right up tight against your ear, is also radiating RF energy right into your ear, right?

    Chanchan, does the PHS still do blood tests every few weeks for people working with radioactive isotopes, or do they consider the dosimeters safe enough? (We used to get blood drawn every two weeks by those vampires when I was working with Radium D+E. Go through the vein, then pull back until the blood flowed - and you continued leaking out of the unplugged hole. Talk about shocky.)
    Thank you. This sort of BS misinformation is smelly and gross and needs to be put back in the trash heap it came from.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    07-01-2018 01:23 PM
  17. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Don't really care. Sooner or later, something is probably going to give me cancer. I'd rather not waste my time worrying about something I can't control.
    Morty2264 and SDTRMG like this.
    07-02-2018 08:07 AM
  18. Morty2264's Avatar
    Don't really care. Sooner or later, something is probably going to give me cancer. I'd rather not waste my time worrying about something I can't control.
    I couldn't agree with you more.
    Golfdriver97 and SDTRMG like this.
    07-02-2018 09:02 AM
  19. Mike Dee's Avatar
    07-02-2018 07:26 PM
  20. L0n3N1nja's Avatar
    Not gonna worry about my phone, I'm surrounded by others with phones and cell towers, can't really avoid the radiation whether it's harmful or not.
    Morty2264 likes this.
    07-03-2018 01:33 AM
  21. zipro's Avatar
    Scared or not: at least Samsung has had an excellent track record producing low-radiaton phones. Apple, with the exception of the new iPhone X, has always been through the roof in this aspect. Even their airpods have a SAR of 0.45, which is already higher than the S9+, except that people have those things in their ears for hours every day
    07-17-2018 07:19 AM
  22. Itsa_Me_Mario's Avatar
    Scared or not: at least Samsung has had an excellent track record producing low-radiaton phones. Apple, with the exception of the new iPhone X, has always been through the roof in this aspect. Even their airpods have a SAR of 0.45, which is already higher than the S9+, except that people have those things in their ears for hours every day
    Two things.

    One, the electronic manufacturers report the MAXIMUM levels of SAR value, when phone is operating at it's highest power. According to cancer.org, "according to the FCC, comparing SAR values between phones can be misleading. The listed SAR value is based only on the phone operating at its highest power, not on what users would typically be exposed to with normal phone use. The actual SAR value during use varies based on a number of factors, so it’s possible that a phone with a lower listed SAR value might actually expose a person to more RF energy than one with a higher listed SAR value in some cases".

    Two, RF waves produced by cell phones are not strong enough to damage DNA directly or to heat body tissues. That is the reason that researchers aren't even sure how cell phones COULD cause cancer, which is in accord with the preponderance of evidence that shows not only a lack of causal link between cell phone usage and any type of cancer, but a complete lack of correlation as well. The WHO has classified RF as "possibly carcinogenic to humans", however the important context that the RF waves on cell phones are not strong enough to do so means that when the WHO is referring to RF, they're clearly talking about mass exposure, not the extremely limited RF waves in our phones.

    FDA: “The majority of studies published have failed to show an association between exposure to radiofrequency from a cell phone and health problems.”

    FCC: “There is no scientific evidence that proves that wireless phone usage can lead to cancer or a variety of other problems, including headaches, dizziness or memory loss. However, organizations in the United States and overseas are sponsoring research and investigating claims of possible health effects related to the use of wireless telephones.”

    CDC: “At this time we do not have the science to link health problems to cell phone use. Scientific studies are underway to determine whether cell phone use may cause health effects.”

    NIEHS: “Current scientific evidence has not conclusively linked cell phone use with any adverse health problems, but more research is needed.”

    NCI: “Studies thus far have not shown a consistent link between cell phone use and cancers of the brain, nerves, or other tissues of the head or neck. More research is needed because cell phone technology and how people use cell phones have been changing rapidly.”

    Key theme = the fear mongering of the video creator's deliberate misinformation is entirely groundless. Experts continue to do research in order to try to keep up with changes in usage habits and changes in technology, etc, however the fact that such research exists is not the same thing as evidence of the opposite conclusion of all the research done to date.

    The upper limit on SAR imposed by the FCC in the US is 1.6 W/kg of body weight. 0.45 is obviously less than 1/3 of the allowable limit, and the 0.45 represents the maximum SAR level of those airpods.
    PapaGary likes this.
    07-17-2018 07:58 AM
  23. L0n3N1nja's Avatar
    Forgot I commented in this already haha.
    07-17-2018 12:17 PM

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