11-02-2011 12:33 AM
38 12
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  1. bear_lx's Avatar
    for the money, its a winner... you dont get much more with the photon or gs2... dual core processors, better FFC, but honoestly this is the fastest single core processor on the market and the only one that competes with dual core from what ive read. i just switched to sprint from tmobile, and i went with the nexus s 4g specifically for that price difference.
    09-20-2011 11:44 AM
  2. bear_lx's Avatar
    Wow! Used that phone about 5 or 6 phones ago... at this point, any smartphone will be a significant upgrade for you.



    .Also coming next month, the evaluation period for new phones will go from the current 30-days to two weeks. So you will need to factor that in your purchase decision.
    already in effect, you have 14 days to try it
    09-20-2011 11:46 AM
  3. AndroidOne's Avatar
    already in effect, you have 14 days to try it
    You are right, I guess I am a month behind... my bad...
    09-20-2011 11:48 AM
  4. rckclmber75's Avatar
    If you are willing to use your LAST yearly update on it, then the NS4G at that price point is a no brainer. Granted, there are some issues with this phone (as well as ANY OTHER smartphone) that affect some users more than others, but overall is a very capable Android phone.



    Please be advised that Sprint is ending the Premier program so you have until 12/31/2012 to use your last yearly upgrade, after that I believe everyone will be eligible for an upgrade discount every 20 months. Also coming next month, the evaluation period for new phones will go from the current 30-days to two weeks. So you will need to factor that in your purchase decision.
    THAT is news to me on both counts. Hmm. So whatever I go with now I must stay with for nearly 2 years, or pay a premium to buy off-network (to me, no phone is worth $600)? That kind of shoots my whole "buy decent phone for a year and upgrade to the next next-gen in Sep" plan full of holes.

    I understand you were trying to help, but that made things more difficult.

    Would you keep yours from now into 2013?
    09-20-2011 11:48 AM
  5. rckclmber75's Avatar
    for the money, its a winner... you dont get much more with the photon or gs2... dual core processors, better FFC, but honoestly this is the fastest single core processor on the market and the only one that competes with dual core from what ive read. i just switched to sprint from tmobile, and i went with the nexus s 4g specifically for that price difference.
    Have you experienced the reception/call quality, signal strength (3G/4G) etc. problems I read so much about?

    I'm not a "power user", and the only games I play are Chess, Backgammon, etc. All I need is something "snappy", that doesn't hang when I'm switching apps, running google maps for, has a good messaging/contact interface and would make a decent music source in my car, when wired.

    Thanks for the input, btw.
    09-20-2011 11:53 AM
  6. AndroidOne's Avatar
    THAT is news to me on both counts. Hmm. So whatever I go with now I must stay with for nearly 2 years, or pay a premium to buy off-network (to me, no phone is worth $600)? That kind of shoots my whole "buy decent phone for a year and upgrade to the next next-gen in Sep" plan full of holes.
    I thought so... that's why I mentioned it so you can take that into consideration.

    Would you keep yours from now into 2013?
    I rarely keep a phone more than a year and most often than not, buy off contract. But that is me. So if your question is: will this phone be a good device until 2013, my answer is definitely yes... unless you feel the overwhelming need to be on the bleeding edge of phone technology that is.

    One thing you need to understand about Android OS is that every manufacturer loads a customized version of Android on their devices full of add ons and eye candy. This is all good and dandy until an OS update comes along and you have to wait (and wait, and in the case of Samsung, wait some more and then some) for the manufacturer to add all the customization to the new OS before it releases it to their devices - that is if they decide is worthy for them to go through the trouble of doing all that for an old device. When that happens, your only recourse is to root your phone and load a custom ROM with the update that you want.

    The Nexus line of phones is a different beast. It has the pure Android OS direct from Google with no OEM customization of any kind. You can add and customize as you please of course. So when an OS update is released, the Nexus line of phones are bound to get the official OS update way before any other device on the market. So your phone is likely to be running the latest OS at any time.

    Have you experienced the reception/call quality, signal strength (3G/4G) etc. problems I read so much about?

    I'm not a "power user", and the only games I play are Chess, Backgammon, etc. All I need is something "snappy", that doesn't hang when I'm switching apps, running google maps for, has a good messaging/contact interface and would make a decent music source in my car, when wired.

    Thanks for the input, btw.
    I have experienced issues with data and phone signal on my Nexus. I believe some of those are related to issues with the Sprint network and others with the phone itself. To me, this is a major issue... I am a surgeon and can't afford to have a device that can potentially drop a call that may be of critical importance. If your needs are not that demanding, then is not a major issue - in the time I have owned the Nexus (since release) I had three dropped calls
    in total... nothing major by most standards, but in my line of work is one too many. By contrast, on my Evo 4G (another very capable Android phone) I have not experienced one single dropped call in over a year plus of service.

    On the other question, if you are not a power user this phone will be excellent as an Android device. And if you happen to be a power user, this is the easiest Android phone to root and customize... so there you have it.
    09-20-2011 12:11 PM
  7. bear_lx's Avatar
    Have you experienced the reception/call quality, signal strength (3G/4G) etc. problems I read so much about?

    I'm not a "power user", and the only games I play are Chess, Backgammon, etc. All I need is something "snappy", that doesn't hang when I'm switching apps, running google maps for, has a good messaging/contact interface and would make a decent music source in my car, when wired.

    Thanks for the input, btw.
    compared to the htc hd7 i came from it is way better... however that was with tmobile not sprint... i think the call quality and 3g speeds largely depend on what area you live in... much like with any carrier. in my neck of the woods, sprint is strong. so is verizon but way too expensive. i spent 600 bucks to leave them for tmobile and i was with big red for 10 years. so if you already have good call quality and signal strength , you will be fine. radios are important, but not as important as having good coverage in an area. the thing with this phone is it is pure google, so it will always be the first to get the next big update, ( ice cream sadnwhich) so you could use it for the next 2 years and be happy. there are still people on nexus one and now running gingerbread... that was over 2 years ago. not too mention if you dont like it next year, sell it on ebay and buy another one. thats what i did with my hd7.
    09-20-2011 12:17 PM
  8. mtndewgood's Avatar
    First time post. Just registered to read up on this phone. I love what I'm reading about the screen quality. Like the sleek look. Here's where my question comes in. I'll be upgrading from a Palm Pre original (my fourth one at that) and don't want a big hunky phone. This one comes at a great price too. I'm not that familiar with app switching on Android and wonder if that is fluid and fairly fast? I think that and the notification LED is what I will miss most but already saw the sticky workaround for notifications. Lack of FB sync kinda a drawback but not a deal breaker.

    Has anyone else upgraded to this phone coming from WebOS? How was the switch?

    I mainly use my cell to do a lot of texting, check email occasionally, minimal web surfing, and as my only digital camera.
    09-20-2011 12:50 PM
  9. AndroidOne's Avatar
    First time post. Just registered to read up on this phone. I love what I'm reading about the screen quality. Like the sleek look. Here's where my question comes in. I'll be upgrading from a Palm Pre original (my fourth one at that) and don't want a big hunky phone. This one comes at a great price too. I'm not that familiar with app switching on Android and wonder if that is fluid and fairly fast? I think that and the notification LED is what I will miss most but already saw the sticky workaround for notifications. Lack of FB sync kinda a drawback but not a deal breaker.

    Has anyone else upgraded to this phone coming from WebOS? How was the switch?

    I mainly use my cell to do a lot of texting, check email occasionally, minimal web surfing, and as my only digital camera.
    Check the following thread...

    Support Group for those switching from WebOS (palm pre) to Nexus S 4g

    For texting and email this phone is certainly fine. The camera is 5MP but has very decent quality for a phone camera. The stock camera software is a little lacking but there are several apps on the market to improve that.
    09-20-2011 02:05 PM
  10. Dreamliner330's Avatar
    super amoled > retina display
    Color, yes. Clarity, no.

    I'm rolling with a VERY old HTC PPC6800.
    I used to have a PPC6600 & PPC6700...I feel your pain.

    So, I guess my real question is if the NS4G's problems are minor enough to deal with for a year, so I can evaluate next years crop, as screens and specs improve> Or would you, the buyer, simply spend the $200 now for a photon, or ET4G
    Try it for a week and see how you like it. USE it, if you don't experience issues, keep it. For me, dropping calls, speakerphone echo and weak radios broke the camels back. I'm a picky person, but I don't see how dropped calls can be acceptable to anyone...(except maybe the 2007-2010 iPhone users on AT&T, which I still find incredible...dealing with dropped calls for a phone....pfft).

    So, I guess my real question is if the NS4G's problems are minor enough to deal with for a year, so I can evaluate next years crop, as screens and specs improve> Or would you, the buyer, simply spend the $200 now for a photon, or ET4G
    You will always sell your phone for more $$ in 12 months than you paid for the upgrade, either way, your upgrade is 'free.' Keeping a phone for so long as you did, I sure hope you used your upgrades and sold them for profit....


    The first thing every phone manufacturer should get right is the PHONE!
    09-20-2011 04:51 PM
  11. jbizzyphone1's Avatar
    What's the best NoLED app for the nexus? I've had no luck so far. Rooting was a bust too! Scared to try again...maybe I was lucky not to brick it? It said success, but root checker said no dice..go figure
    11-01-2011 08:05 PM
  12. chud's Avatar
    What method did you use to root? The one click method is pretty much fool proof.
    11-01-2011 08:11 PM
  13. Tenebrous's Avatar
    Hmm, I am not sure what is going on with your phone, but some of your cons are pros in my view. The display is gorgeous, the GPS not only locks faster than my old phone, an EVO 4g, but actually keeps up much better. Also, the battery life of my Nexus lasts a lot longer than my old Evo 4g.
    11-02-2011 12:33 AM
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