1. BaldwiJ7's Avatar
    I just found this out today, thought I would share with you guys. Apparently the Kindle 3 charger is the same as the Inspire charger, so you can charge your inspire using the Kindle charger...pretty cool. Not sure if anyone else has figured this out or not yet.
    04-01-2011 04:08 PM
  2. ddot196's Avatar
    Well the device uses micro usb like a lot of electronics so it doesn't suprise me that it is the same.

    Sent from my HTC Inspire 4G
    04-01-2011 04:35 PM
  3. mrcleen's Avatar
    You might want to check the power supply and make sure the charge rate isn't too high. Stock charger is 1 amp. If kindle is more than that it could cause problems with the battery over heating during charging or worse.....
    04-02-2011 07:34 AM
  4. Dilrod's Avatar
    I wouldnt recommend using it other than maybe a quick charge. The ampage is different and the kindle one is not regulated like your stock charger. (meaning it wont stop charging when the phone is fully charged, causing damage to your battery).
    04-02-2011 08:20 AM
  5. Jets's Avatar
    I wouldnt recommend using it other than maybe a quick charge. The ampage is different and the kindle one is not regulated like your stock charger. (meaning it wont stop charging when the phone is fully charged, causing damage to your battery).
    The Kindle charger amperage is .85 versus 1 amp for the stock HTC. Where are you getting the information on it being regulated?
    FWIW, I charge my Inspire through the USB port in my car. Are you implying there is something wrong with that and the cheap plastic HTC usb charger that came with the phone is the only safe way to charge it???
    04-02-2011 11:29 AM
  6. pazzo02's Avatar
    FWIW, I charge my Inspire through the USB port in my car.
    Be aware that charging from USB only gives you a trickle charge.
    04-05-2011 07:58 PM
  7. Silas0220's Avatar
    The charging is regulated by the fact that it is USB, USB will only allow a certain amount of charge to go through. As long as the USB plug fits, you can't break anything. I believe that was the idea when moving to it as a standard. As for regulating, that has absolutely nothing at all to do with the charger and everything to do with the battery. Do your research (Lithium-ion battery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and USB As A Power Source for good starting points).
    04-05-2011 10:56 PM
  8. Jets's Avatar
    The charging is regulated by the fact that it is USB, USB will only allow a certain amount of charge to go through. As long as the USB plug fits, you can't break anything. I believe that was the idea when moving to it as a standard. As for regulating, that has absolutely nothing at all to do with the charger and everything to do with the battery. Do your research (Lithium-ion battery - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and USB As A Power Source for good starting points).
    Bravo!
    04-06-2011 08:58 PM
  9. dude_hdt's Avatar
    Does anyone know how much milliamps is output from a PC when you charge it thru the PC's USB?

    The stock battery is around 1200 mah so any charger that doesn't push above 1.2 amps should be good. I have serveral after market chargers that put out 700 to 850 ma that I've been using and have been fine.
    07-20-2011 10:58 AM
  10. repligator's Avatar
    Does anyone know how much milliamps is output from a PC when you charge it thru the PC's USB?

    The stock battery is around 1200 mah so any charger that doesn't push above 1.2 amps should be good. I have serveral after market chargers that put out 700 to 850 ma that I've been using and have been fine.
    Every pc will supply a slightly different amperage through the usb port. They all deliver 5 volts of course, but even the same pc can deliver different milliamps in the front vs back ports. The same pc can even deliver different current from the same port depending on what is going on inside the rest of the computer with the HDD etc.,

    The important point is that a pc will almost always provide a bit less than is maximum rated for a particular usb chargeable device--sometimes as low as 500ma.
    07-20-2011 11:43 AM
  11. Jalarm's Avatar
    My old LG crap phone works with my inspire.

    Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
    07-20-2011 12:08 PM
  12. brad_wp's Avatar
    Every pc will supply a slightly different amperage through the usb port. They all deliver 5 volts of course, but even the same pc can deliver different milliamps in the front vs back ports. The same pc can even deliver different current from the same port depending on what is going on inside the rest of the computer with the HDD etc.,

    The important point is that a pc will almost always provide a bit less than is maximum rated for a particular usb chargeable device--sometimes as low as 500ma.
    repligator is correct. PC USB is generally no more than 500 mAh. As far as proper amperage on a charger. A good rule of thumb is that you shouldn't charge a cell phone battery at greater than 1.0 C.

    This means that you can charge at an amperage rate that applied as a discharge, would drain the battery in 1 hour. Simplified our stock Inspire 4G battery = 1250 mAh. So you should be able to safely plug up to a 1250 mAh charger (1.25 Ah). The lower mAh rate the charger provides the longer the battery takes to charge. Remember, with a lower charge or discharge rate less heat is generated which is generally better for the health of the battery.

    I think this becomes more important in the car. Many of the cigarette lighter USB adapters/car chargers supply something less than 1000 mAh. When I had my Tilt 1 I had an old Motorolla RAZR OEM car adapter that only provided 500 mAh, so if I was using AT&T Navigator (which uses your Data and GPS radios) my phone would barely charge. I was also finding that if I had my bluetooth turned on while using Navigator that my discharge rate was actually higher than 500 mAh, so even while plugged into the charger my phone was not actually charging, and the battery would get so hot that the over-temp protection would kick on and disable the charging circuit. This would also happen occasionally if I was using USB tethering if I didn't disable computer USB charging.

    Bottom line is if you don't need/want to be able to use your phone while charging a lower mAh charger will suit your needs, and may be better for your battery health as far as longevity goes. If want/need to be able to use your phone while charging (with the Inspire's poor battery life this is probably where most of us fall) you should use a charger with a closer to 1000 mAh charge rate.

    pfew, that was a lot longer post than I originally intended.
    07-28-2011 09:53 AM
  13. repligator's Avatar
    A stipulation that also needs to be made here is the difference between battery mAh and transformer/usb mA.

    Current is like water, Voltage is pressure. A battery is a storage tank which can deliver all of its current in short period of time or smaller amounts over a longer period. Ideally the 1250mAh battery could last for five hours if the phone was drawing 250ma per hour--Or 25 hours drawing an average of only 50ma per hour--Or 2.5A for 30 min. (Not a strictly linear function though)

    A wall plug transformer or USB plug is like a hose (with a regulator/valve) that can deliver up to the rated mA forever (until it is unplugged). The phone will draw only what it needs from that current.

    The rule of thumb is that the device can typically accept a little less than half the amount of mA that the battery is rated at in mAh. In this case the phone can take about 600ma of direct current from a transformer or usb plug. Any (Non-HTC) plug rated higher than 5VDC and 600ma is probably not a good idea. The HTC plug is rated at 1A presumably to deliver recharge current to the battery while allowing the phone to function normally.

    Sorry, I have the day off today.
    07-28-2011 01:28 PM
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