12-05-2016 02:02 PM
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  1. boogas8's Avatar
    metropcs does offer wifi calling.
    Yes, they do. I just found that out a few days ago. After reading more about it, I would trust T-Mobiles WiFi calling much more than Metro PCS.

    Here's the app they use:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ApK1yATYn4HICA

    Sent from my Galaxy Note 4 via the Uncarrier
    03-01-2015 06:30 PM
  2. bahay's Avatar
    It doesn't apply to iPhone neither. I have a Verizon iPhone 5S with T-Mo sim card and have Wifi Calling
    06-19-2015 04:24 PM
  3. Almeuit's Avatar
    It doesn't apply to iPhone neither. I have a Verizon iPhone 5S with T-Mo sim card and have Wifi Calling
    iPhone is different since Apple puts the software into all iPhones and it only enables when the correct carrier is being used. With Android it has to be put in my the carrier.
    06-19-2015 05:17 PM
  4. raino's Avatar
    iPhone is different since Apple puts the software into all iPhones and it only enables when the correct carrier is being used. With Android it has to be put in my the carrier.
    BlackBerry does that too. But here's something that as far as I know is unique to Apple: they get to push out their own updates and WFC works automatically, or shortly thereafter. I wonder why that is.

    With BlackBerry (and I'm guessing it's going to be the same with Nexus phones,) TMO controls WFC.
    06-19-2015 10:19 PM
  5. Almeuit's Avatar
    BlackBerry does that too. But here's something that as far as I know is unique to Apple: they get to push out their own updates and WFC works automatically, or shortly thereafter. I wonder why that is.

    With BlackBerry (and I'm guessing it's going to be the same with Nexus phones,) TMO controls WFC.
    I believe it is due to wifi calling being programmed directly in by Apple. To my understanding -- T-Mobile tells them what is needed to connect and then Apple programs it directly into the OS.
    06-21-2015 12:29 AM
  6. boogas8's Avatar
    I believe it is due to wifi calling being programmed directly in by Apple. To my understanding -- T-Mobile tells them what is needed to connect and then Apple programs it directly into the OS.
    This has to be true. Apple would never allow anyone else to program their phones.

    Sent from my Galaxy S6 Edge via the Uncarrier
    06-21-2015 01:00 AM
  7. raino's Avatar
    I believe it is due to wifi calling being programmed directly in by Apple. To my understanding -- T-Mobile tells them what is needed to connect and then Apple programs it directly into the OS.
    Well each OS provider programs their OS--TMO doesn't do that for any of them. There's no dispute there. What I'm talking about is the acceptance part. For BB10 (and I suspect it's the same way for Android,) TMO whitelists devices (once) and WFC-approved OS builds (recurringly, as new builds are released.) But they do the latter after testing, at least in the case of BB10 and Android. But with Apple, since they push out the OS updates without carriers' say, TMO seems to automatically whitelist their releases. Why is that?
    06-21-2015 09:51 AM
  8. DumDee2's Avatar
    well hopefully it might starting being the same for windows devices with the release of the lumia 640
    06-24-2015 07:27 AM
  9. LeoRex's Avatar
    Nexus 6 wfc is added by Google... Not T-Mobile or Sprint. In fact, Google finally released the source for the Nexus 6 wfc into AOSP mainline. It won't work unless your carrier supports it, but it'll be there for all.

    OEMs handle the other implementations... They just code it to T-Mobile's spec, which I'm guessing is some standardized SIP/VOIP protocols.

    Apple's implementation is no different.
    raino likes this.
    06-27-2015 09:17 AM
  10. raino's Avatar
    Nexus 6 wfc is added by Google... Not T-Mobile or Sprint. In fact, Google finally released the source for the Nexus 6 wfc into AOSP mainline. It won't work unless your carrier supports it, but it'll be there for all.

    OEMs handle the other implementations... They just code it to T-Mobile's spec, which I'm guessing is some standardized SIP/VOIP protocols.

    Apple's implementation is no different.
    Sticking with Android then, why is it that, for example, an AT&T Note 4 can't do WFC on TMO, but a TMO Note 4 can? The originator of the OS is the same (Google,) as is the OEM (Samsung.) Is it that OEMs aren't coding non-TMO variants for WFC?
    06-27-2015 04:15 PM
  11. LeoRex's Avatar
    The originator of the OS is the same (Google,) as is the OEM (Samsung.) Is it that OEMs aren't coding non-TMO variants for WFC?
    Right. Samsung grabs the AOSP source from Google and (heavily) modifies it based on the model given to the carrier. An AT&T Note 4 doesn't need the Samsung developed WiFi Calling code, so they leave it out. Why would they include it?

    They might both be called the Note 4, but they are different models with slightly different hardware... Samsung doesn't make universal models like the Nexus 6. If a carrier doesn't need LTE band 4 or WiFi Calling, the phone won't support it. If you have an AT&T version, you are stuck with AT&T, or one of the MVNOs that operate on AT&T's network, if you want everything to work.

    That's why it's bad news to load a T-Mobile Note 4 ROM on an AT&T version... They aren't the exact same phone.
    raino likes this.
    06-27-2015 09:28 PM
  12. raino's Avatar
    Why would they include it?
    I guess because it would have been less work to take it out than modify the AOSP code for TMO vs. everyone else (shouldn't be a particularly volatile piece of code?) But I am thinking with my "single OS provider, single OEM" hat on

    Thanks for the explanation.
    06-28-2015 09:30 AM
  13. LeoRex's Avatar
    I guess because it would have been less work to take it out than modify the AOSP code for TMO vs. everyone else
    This is Samsung, remember. When in doubt, they release another model. And with the amount they are modifying the base code, doing features for large carriers a la carte isn't that big a deal. They just develop source for a 'stock' Note 4 then start forking off code streams for each variant.... Of which there are, I believe, 24 different models just for the Note 4 alone.

    Yikes.
    raino likes this.
    06-28-2015 02:45 PM
  14. raino's Avatar
    This is Samsung, remember. When in doubt, they release another model. And with the amount they are modifying the base code, doing features for large carriers a la carte isn't that big a deal. They just develop source for a 'stock' Note 4 then start forking off code streams for each variant.... Of which there are, I believe, 24 different models just for the Note 4 alone.

    Yikes.
    I didn't mean to necessarily single out Samsung, but point taken lol. The Note 4 was the first WFC supported phone to came to mind. Since no other OEM's non-TMO models can do WFC on TMO, it's safe to infer that they're all doing the same thing?

    And are we certain that TMO does not have a role to play in approval, i.e. beyond just specifying their specific voIP/SIP parameters?
    06-28-2015 05:22 PM
  15. LeoRex's Avatar
    Well, T-Mobile has a say as to what goes in their models. But they are a carrier, not a phone manufacturer. Samsung, LG, etc, do all the development, but the carrier is involved in the overall process.

    Other than the Nexus 6, if you want T-Mobile WiFi Calling, you need to buy the T-Mobile model.
    06-28-2015 09:10 PM
  16. tardus's Avatar
    I still think it's crap that they can't make WiFi calling work in app form. If they cared to try, I'm sure they could figure it out. They just don't want to go out of their way to deliver a perk to non-carrier devices when it can be an incentive to get people to buy their phone from T-Mobile.
    Well over at XDA there's been a bounty for some time. It's not a trivial exercise.
    06-29-2015 04:31 PM
  17. LeoRex's Avatar
    There is WiFi calling in app form.. Hangouts. But the trick is getting it integrated with the main phone system. Having the phone switch from the phone radio to the network stack and back. That requires system, kernel and radio firmware to have it all work in tandem.

    It takes OEMs months to implement the feature, then there is carrier qualification and I'm sure some sort of regulatory crap that have to deal with. If they could just make an app that got the job done, they would.
    06-30-2015 10:09 PM
  18. Gabriel619's Avatar
    Well, T-Mobile has a say as to what goes in their models. But they are a carrier, not a phone manufacturer. Samsung, LG, etc, do all the development, but the carrier is involved in the overall process.

    Other than the Nexus 6, if you want T-Mobile WiFi Calling, you need to buy the T-Mobile model.
    I have TMO and I've been thinking of buying a Nexus 6 via the Google play store. If I'm understanding you correctly, the Nexus 6 from the play store will have Wifi Calling that is fully functional for TMO, straight out of the box, with no need to download or install anything?

    I've been trying to decide between the Oneplus One and Nexus 6, and WiFi Calling is an important factor for me.
    07-05-2015 12:46 AM
  19. LeoRex's Avatar
    Well, I'm not sure what software version you'll get from the Play Store version... You might have to load the T-Mobile firmware once you get it. All the US versions are the same phone, but the software loaded might not be quite the correct version.

    Loading a new factory image on a new phone is trivial. Just download the kit from Google and follow the simple instructions... Or just download Wugfresh's Nexus Root Toolkit on your computer, which is even easier.
    07-05-2015 07:17 AM
  20. Gabriel619's Avatar
    Well, I'm not sure what software version you'll get from the Play Store version... You might have to load the T-Mobile firmware once you get it. All the US versions are the same phone, but the software loaded might not be quite the correct version.

    Loading a new factory image on a new phone is trivial. Just download the kit from Google and follow the simple instructions... Or just download Wugfresh's Nexus Root Toolkit on your computer, which is even easier.
    I'll check it out. Thanks!
    07-05-2015 02:47 PM
  21. LeoRex's Avatar
    I'll check it out. Thanks!
    Do... Nexus 6 is Nexus 6. One of the many advantages. It supports every band, every protocol. VoLTE on each carrier that supports it. Leave Verizon for AT&T, you are fine. Change your mind again and go with StraightTalk, or T-Mobile... All set. Sure, to get every little bit, you might have to load a different image, but Google gives their blessing to unlock and change your phone's software.
    07-05-2015 10:30 PM
  22. 100 Gluten's Avatar
    Hi Everyone. I signed up on the forum just to get on this thread. Did WFC on the Nexus 6 work? I've heard that TMO locks the WFC feature to IMEIs of phones that were actually sold by them, so a generic Nexus 6 might not work.

    TMO recently stopped selling the Nexus 6. Not sure why.

    Is TMO WFC support now in the generic ASOP? If I had a TMO-purchased phone with working WFC and then installed Cyanogenmod, would I lose WFC, or would it still work?

    Thank you.
    11-21-2015 09:22 AM
  23. npaladin-2000's Avatar
    I've got a Nexus 6 on Marshmallow, WiFi calling is working fine. I assume it's generic now, especially with AT&T and Verizon rolling out WiFi calling as well.
    11-21-2015 10:15 AM
  24. 100 Gluten's Avatar
    I've got a Nexus 6 on Marshmallow, WiFi calling is working fine. I assume it's generic now, especially with AT&T and Verizon rolling out WiFi calling as well.
    Thank you! So your Nexus 6 was purchased from someplace other than T-Mobile? I'm considering a switch to T-Mobile to get their international features, but my only assumption is that a phone purchased from another vendor won't work for WFC.

    It can't be THAT generic, especially when you consider that WFC isn't supported even for Nexus 5s that were originally sold by T-Mobile. For whatever reason, all of them are blocked from using this feature even though there is no technological reason that would prevent it from working?
    11-21-2015 12:05 PM
  25. npaladin-2000's Avatar
    Thank you! So your Nexus 6 was purchased from someplace other than T-Mobile? I'm considering a switch to T-Mobile to get their international features, but my only assumption is that a phone purchased from another vendor won't work for WFC.

    It can't be THAT generic, especially when you consider that WFC isn't supported even for Nexus 5s that were originally sold by T-Mobile. For whatever reason, all of them are blocked from using this feature even though there is no technological reason that would prevent it from working?
    A Nexus 5 with Marshmallow will probably work to some degree though the handoffs might be iffy. There's a bit of a hardware requirement with WFC. I got my Nexus 6 from an eBay seller and flashed it myself.
    11-21-2015 12:44 PM
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