Adaptive Battery?

Technerd71

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So how many people here use adaptive battery on the Pixel 7 or 7 Pro?

Does it help battery life? Does it affect performance?

I am used to Samsung phones and the adaptive battery feature on it. It is one of the first things I normally turn off.

I haven't ever noticed a big improvement in battery life or anything really.

I would like to know if people think that adaptive battery works well and if they ever tested running it on and off to see a difference? Does it throttle performance?

Thanks.
 

B. Diddy

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I haven't done a comparison, but I always keep it on, and (a) haven't had issues with missing notifications or poor performance, and (b) battery life has been phenomenal, with battery going from 100% to maybe 80-85% by the end of the day with light usage, maybe 60% with heavy usage.
 

Maljunulo

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I’m not sure that the point is to improve battery life in the sense of more hours per charge, but rather in the sense of having the battery in better health after a year, two years, or even five years.
 
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mustang7757

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So how many people here use adaptive battery on the Pixel 7 or 7 Pro?

Does it help battery life? Does it affect performance?

I am used to Samsung phones and the adaptive battery feature on it. It is one of the first things I normally turn off.

I haven't ever noticed a big improvement in battery life or anything really.

I would like to know if people think that adaptive battery works well and if they ever tested running it on and off to see a difference? Does it throttle performance?

Thanks.
As it mentions here ive not turned mine off or tested it .
9594b86a6f55c73749458a10108e8cf3.jpg


Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using Tapatalk
 

Technerd71

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I have read that. I don't want performance to be reduced or notifications to be delayed and what would be really interesting to know is if there are any numbers on this?

Like how much does it reduce performance or throttle the CPU? How much longer does the battery last with adaptive Battery enabled vs unenabled? If it last 30 minutes more but throttles the device by 30-40% then it would not be worth it? Does it constantly throttle the device or only under heavy load? How does it manage background apps and notifications.

There is no information I could find on this.

I may try a test but it is very subjective and so many factors at play that it is almost impossible for me to measure unless I did exactly the same thing in the same way under the same conditions with it on and off for a few days each at least.

So if anyone has any actual information on how this works I would really like to know. Otherwise it seems a bit like something I don't want to use. I like to have the best performance on my device. I also like decent battery life and I wish they weren't mutually exclusive.

Thanks for any info on this!
 

Technerd71

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I’m not sure that the point is to improve battery life in the sense of more hours per charge, but rather in the sense of having the battery in better health after a year, two years, or even five years.

So why would throttling the phone or reducing performance, killing background apps or delaying notifications help extend the useful life of the battery in any way? I don't understand that at all? Please explain if you would.

I have used many phones for years and never heard such a thing. Battery life in terms of the lifetime of the battery is mostly related to how the device is charged. How many charging cycles, not charging to 100% and not letting the battery completely drain.

Unless the CPU is overheating and the heat from the SOC would cause battery degradation I don't see how throttling would help? And if the SOC were that hot it could cause a much more dangerous situation like a battery catching on fire, etc.
 

Maljunulo

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So why would throttling the phone or reducing performance, killing background apps or delaying notifications help extend the useful life of the battery in any way? I don't understand that at all? Please explain if you would.

I have used many phones for years and never heard such a thing. Battery life in terms of the lifetime of the battery is mostly related to how the device is charged. How many charging cycles, not charging to 100% and not letting the battery completely drain.

Unless the CPU is overheating and the heat from the SOC would cause battery degradation I don't see how throttling would help? And if the SOC were that hot it could cause a much more dangerous situation like a battery catching on fire, etc.

I think that the modified overnight charging profile is what is supposed to improve the long-term battery health.

Perhaps I misunderstood what you were talking about.
 

Technerd71

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I think that the modified overnight charging profile is what is supposed to improve the long-term battery health.

Perhaps I misunderstood what you were talking about.

Yeah that is called adaptive charging not adaptive battery.

It is easy to misread something. No problem and thanks for your response.
 

THEPRFCT10

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Agreed I wish there were some hard and fast numbers provided in order to properly justify whether the benefits of it turned on were worth the sacrifices etc.

Sent from my Pixel 7 using Tapatalk
 

cbreze

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It doesn't throttle anything I can tell anyway. I use it and only thing I notice is when I charge each night, all night, the battery charges to 80% and stays there and doesn't finish until shortly before my alarm is set to go off. I believe the whole idea of this feature is to prolong overall battery health. I've yet to drop below 40% using the phone all day long. Fantastic battery life.
 

dc52ltr

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It doesn't throttle anything I can tell anyway. I use it and only thing I notice is when I charge each night, all night, the battery charges to 80% and stays there and doesn't finish until shortly before my alarm is set to go off. I believe the whole idea of this feature is to prolong overall battery health. I've yet to drop below 40% using the phone all day long. Fantastic battery life.
Exactly the same here...

Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using AC Forums mobile app
 

Stanley Kubrick

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I use adaptive battery and I have no notification delays. I agree with all the others who's explanation is that this is for the long term health of the battery. Yes, yes the wording states that performance and background activity may be reduced but I have not experienced any such thing. The SOC's used in "most" modern higher end phones are so fast that a little throttling is unnoticeable to any human without sophisticated tools to measure the difference. I leave it on in the hopes that it will make the battery last at least 3 years without having to charge up mid day on year 3! Now if you plan on keeping the phone for only one year or so then by all means go ahead and use it full-tilt 24/7! YMMV
 

Joshua Luther1

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I only use adaptive charging when I'm charging it at night. It knows when my alarm will go off in the morning so it will charge slowly over the period of time that I'm sleeping.

Sent from my Pixel 7 Pro using Tapatalk
 

TiramisuCP

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I use adaptive battery and I have no notification delays. I agree with all the others who's explanation is that this is for the long term health of the battery. Yes, yes the wording states that performance and background activity may be reduced but I have not experienced any such thing. The SOC's used in "most" modern higher end phones are so fast that a little throttling is unnoticeable to any human without sophisticated tools to measure the difference. I leave it on in the hopes that it will make the battery last at least 3 years without having to charge up mid day on year 3! Now if you plan on keeping the phone for only one year or so then by all means go ahead and use it full-tilt 24/7! YMMV

I actually just found this post because I noticed that when adaptive battery is on voice dictation is slower as the words are delayed. When it's on sometimes dictation will just stop (mic turns off) in the middle of a sentence even though I'm still talking.


Transitioning between apps and opening up text messages is a little slower. The phone has a slight stutter for me when adaptive battery is turned on. You can turn it off and notice the results instantly and switch back and forth several times.

It might be more noticeable to me because I have the animations turned down in the developer options so that the phone is more snappy. I think this started with the last update to be perfectly honest.
 

Jx J

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The Pixel lacks the one battery feature I want.

My Samsung tablet has a feature to stop the charging at 85%. The Pixel does not.
I prefer to limit charging, as I've had a few batteries swell up in other devices and after researching it, I find that charging to 100% reduces battery life significantly.
I can use an app so my phone buzzes when it reaches a pre-defined charge limit. However, if I'm not in the room when that goes off, it carries on charging. I would get a "Chargie", but customer reviews are not that good.

The ideal implementation would allow me to set a maximum charge limit, then have a temporary override for days when I will be using the phone a lot, without access to a charger.
Now that's properly adaptive to my requirements.

Of course, to provide some balance, the Pixel does have some advantages over Samsung products. Such as a lower price and being totally free from awful Samsung software.
 
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