Cause of slipping Nexus 4 discovered!

anon(55900)

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Scientific American magazine just did an article about the Nexus 4 and it's glass back. Seems the glass is multi layered and by rubbing action creates a massive electrical charge. The layered glass acts as an insulator and capacitor of sorts.

The massive charge has, in simple terms, highly jiggily atoms which can indeed tend to levitate the Nexus 4! As the charge builds the atoms become excited. At the molecular level the atoms start to jiggle violently, causing a pushing effect. Soon the push effect becomes so strong the phone and the repulsion between atoms builds, then ooopppps, off and running the Nexus 4 goes! Your common cause and affect!

This has been compared to the mysterious scooting rocks in the salt flats of America. Where stones have left a trail as they mysteriously travel across the ground. As can be seen here, Sailing stones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Has anyone received a shock yet from touching their Nexus 4? Be careful, you may need to attach some forms of grounding cable, there may be a new product coming out for this. A gorgeous flat copper plate with a ground cable to earth. You simply drive a round into the earth, attach the cable and set your Nexus 4 upon the plate at night to keep it grounded and stop this mysterious levitation.

Good luck and be safe ! ;)
 
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Doooshty

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Scientific American magazine just did an article about the Nexus 4 and it's glass back. Seems the glass is multi layered and by rubbing action creates a massive electrical charge. The layered glass acts as an insulator and capacitor of sorts.

The massive charge has, in simple terms, highly jiggily atoms which can indeed tend the levitate the Nexus 4! This has been compared to the mysterious scooting rocks in the salt flats of America. Where stones have left a trail as they mysteriously travel across the ground. Has anyone received a shock yet from touching their Nexus 4?

Be careful, you may need to attach some forms of grounding cable, there may be a new product coming out for this. A gorgeous flat copper plate with a ground cable to earth. You simply drive a round into the earth, attach the cable and set you Nexus 4 upon the plate at night to keep it grounded and stop this mysterious levitation.

Good luck and be safe

Nice try. This is obviously made up to try and create fake news. Its slippery because its glass. Scientific American would not devote resources to try and figure out why something made of glass is slippery.
It would havepossibly been believable to some if you hadn't put in that bit about the grounding rod.
 

Hubertsng

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Nice try. This is obviously made up to try and create fake news. Its slippery because its glass. Scientific American would not devote resources to try and figure out why something made of glass is slippery.
It would havepossibly been believable to some if you hadn't put in that bit about the grounding rod.

Not sure if you are joking or not. Normal glass doesn't slip like that and the cover doesn't slip like that either even though it's the same material.
THe glass could AID it being slippery but I don't think it's 100% that.
 

anon(55900)

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Jiggly atoms? lol

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

Yes, alot of this, jiggily atoms situations, is seen to be due to entanglement of particles. Yes, the particles in the glass back of the Nexus 4 become entangled with the energy in the hands of each new Nexus 4 owner. As the new Nexus 4 owner caresses the new phone. An entanglement occurs and becomes a state of shared excitement. It also appears that once the newness wears off so does the entanglement decrease. There is hope my friends, there is hope.
 

Doooshty

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Not sure if you are joking or not. Normal glass doesn't slip like that and the cover doesn't slip like that either even though it's the same material.
THe glass could AID it being slippery but I don't think it's 100% that.

The gorilla glass 2 coating is what makes it slippery. Its done to aid fingers ability to slide smooth on the screen. They may have put more coats on the back than the front due to touch sensors. I can assure you that its not from jiggly atoms. This is the stupidest explanation I have ever read.
 

sting7k

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Scientific American magazine just did an article about the Nexus 4 and it's glass back. Seems the glass is multi layered and by rubbing action creates a massive electrical charge. The layered glass acts as an insulator and capacitor of sorts.

The massive charge has, in simple terms, highly jiggily atoms which can indeed tend to levitate the Nexus 4! As the charge builds the atoms become excited. At the molecular level the atoms start to jiggle violently, causing a pushing effect. Soon the push effect becomes so strong the phone and the repulsion between atoms builds, then ooopppps, off and running the Nexus 4 goes! Your common cause and affect!

This has been compared to the mysterious scooting rocks in the salt flats of America. Where stones have left a trail as they mysteriously travel across the ground. As can be seen here, Sailing stones - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Has anyone received a shock yet from touching their Nexus 4? Be careful, you may need to attach some forms of grounding cable, there may be a new product coming out for this. A gorgeous flat copper plate with a ground cable to earth. You simply drive a round into the earth, attach the cable and set your Nexus 4 upon the plate at night to keep it grounded and stop this mysterious levitation.

Good luck and be safe ! ;)

Do you have a link to this article? I ask because none of that is scientifically correct. Electricity isn't made up of atoms so they can't be "jiggly". Electricity is the flow of electrons which are subatomic particles. Static build up is possible but it would have to be an extreme amount to actually move the device. It would have to be a very very large amount to work against a surface like a table that cannot even cause a static discharge. Not to mention, the glass panels are insulated by plastic housing.

The reason it moves is because the coefficient of kinetic friction between the glass back and most surfaces is very low. This means it takes very little kinetic energy to set the device into motion from it's resting position; such as the tiny motor inside for the vibration effect or any little bump may send it scooting like a hockey puck.
 

codeda

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Pretty sure the OP is joking.......why is everyone so up in arms? Unless I'm completely off here.

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Android Central Forums
 

Hubertsng

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The gorilla glass 2 coating is what makes it slippery. Its done to aid fingers ability to slide smooth on the screen. They may have put more coats on the back than the front due to touch sensors. I can assure you that its not from jiggly atoms. This is the stupidest explanation I have ever read.

Like i said, the front cover isn't slippery like the back so there has to be something in the back that is making it slippery than the front. You know what that means? It's probably not the glass only. I'm not saying it's jiggly atoms (whatever the that is) but it might be something else that is making it slippery.
 

eeleechan

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This has got to be a joke and a bad one, at that. I mean please, just by adding the word 'scientific' doesn't make the story solid and believable. And quoting the Wikipedia instead of actual scientific journal? We all know much of the content in there are crap.
 

copperwatt

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tumblr_lxtrioIljK1qj097p.jpg



This has been compared to the mysterious scooting rocks in the salt flats of America.

Sooo... wind?
 

donec

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The gorilla glass 2 coating is what makes it slippery. Its done to aid fingers ability to slide smooth on the screen. They may have put more coats on the back than the front due to touch sensors. I can assure you that its not from jiggly atoms. This is the stupidest explanation I have ever read.
How do we know that the Gorilla Glass 2 coating was not made by Jello just to give the atoms it's jiggly effect?:D
 

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