Do you agree with the statement that the issue of NFC is overblown?

D13H4RD2L1V3

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That's what OnePlus' CEO Carl Pei mentioned on an Android Authority article. The quote is below.

"I think the entire issue of NFC is overblown. Very few people are using NFC, so we cut it. It’s as simple as that.

I know that Android Pay is coming but all that is in the future. It (NFC) is going to gain widespread adoption in stores 12-18 months from now. By that time people will have moved on to the next device.
"

Do you agree with the statement above?

I currently have no words for it, but I'll likely have one soon.

Article: http://www.androidauthority.com/oneplus-carl-pei-another-phone-in-2015-nfc-is-overblown-630753/
 

Golfdriver97

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I look at it this way: You can't title your product a 'flagship killer' and omit features that are in flagships.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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I look at it this way: You can't title your product a 'flagship killer' and omit features that are in flagships.

Same thing was in my mind when I saw his statement.

Apparently, the contacts that AC thought was for NFC is actually used to tell the phone precisely what type of cover is on the phone so that it changes the theme automatically to match.

I think that feature is kinda ridiculous in a funny way.
 

Aquila

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Not overblown at all. Lollipop and M both can use NFC to transfer all your info when setting up a new device. It's used for payments, for file transfers, security and content sharing. Also used by some for home automation, etc.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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Not overblown at all. Lollipop and M both can use NFC to transfer all your info when setting up a new device. It's used for payments, for file transfers, security and content sharing. Also used by some for home automation, etc.

I use NFC for the following
  • Transferring content between devices
  • Simple pairing with speakers and my Sony mirrorless
  • In the parking lot at a mall where they fit NFC tags on pillars to save your parking location in a single tap

I'll probably get some NFC tags for automated functionality and when Android Pay rolls out, might even use it more frequently.
 
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SactoKingsFan

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No, it's not overblown. I use NFC at least once a week and even mid range devices have NFC. Also should have quick charge.

Sent from my 6045I using Tapatalk
 

eao1991

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It all depends on the user. Some rely on it heavily, while others can live without it. It's an odd omission and now those "very few people" that were using it have been pushed aside. Carl Pei stating the issue is "overblown" is probably not how I would have handled it though. All that does is just upset people more.
 

xocomaox

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This statement is a great PR move to effectively hide the other glaring features that were omitted on the OnePlus Two. Well played, but the consumers that look into high end phones won't be fooled.
 

LeoRex

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Well.. The whole flagship approach is features, features, features. Like Apple, Google is pushing NFC more and more. There will be a real fight to get control of the POS. We might not see NFC as a must have now, but things change.

It wasn't that long ago that cameras in phones were afterthoughts... They took pictures, but they weren't high on anyone's priority list.

The omission of NFC, QC... All seem like cost cutting measures to me. To characterize those as giving users only what the want is disingenuous.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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Alright. Here's my say. Trying not to offend anyone but also trying to state my view.

While Carl Pei does have a point in overall NFC usage, since it's mostly a tech-geek feature, OnePlus is usually mainly known by geeks, as in people who are likely to use NFC. Golfdriver also made an excellent point that for a phone that is being actively marketed as a "2016 Flagship Killer", omitting even flagship basics like quick charging and NFC is somewhat odd and seems to be more of a cost-cutting measure.

I'd also like to make a stand on his statement on Android Pay. If what he said is true about the last part about Android Pay being adopted widely in a year from now and that people would've changed phones then, that's kinda contradicting what OnePlus said about futureproofing the OPT with a Type-C port. It sounds like he's implying that the OPT is only going to be used by users for only a year before they change phones. That's hardly futureproofing to me.

I'm in no way attempting to bash the OnePlus Two, since it's still a good phone for a nice deal at $389 for 64GB, but whatever he said is questionable to me.

Honestly, I have to say that with all the new batch of phones that pack in flagship punch for midrange money like the ASUS Zenfone 2 ZE551ML 64GB, Motorola Moto X Style 2015 and possibly the upcoming Nexus 5 2015, looks like the OnePlus Two is going to be an even tougher sell. Especially considering that the invite system hasn't really improved, given how people can just jump the queue by thousands of numbers just by spamming referral links.
 
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jdot104

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I agree with it being a contradiction for OnePlus to call the 2 a "2016 flagship killer," but I still think the reaction to not having NFC is mostly exaggerated. A lot of the commentary I've seen on numerous blogs has been that people still aren't really using it, they just don't like the fact that it isn't there. I think it was a dumb move (because an NFC tag must cost pennies to include), but I don't use NFC now, so I won't miss it on the OnePlus 2 if I get one.

In comparison to the Moto X, I'd rather have the fingerprint scanner. The OnePlus 2 can still support Android Pay payments on the device itself, and the fingerprint scanner will make that a cinch. And that's not even considering how easy it is to unlock the phone.
 

LeoRex

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I agree with it being a contradiction for OnePlus to call the 2 a "2016 flagship killer," but I still think the reaction to not having NFC is mostly exaggerated.

Of course it is exaggerated... :) That's what blogs do.

I guess from my standpoint, the market has changed. When the OPO first dropped, it was a bit of a new approach. They were trying to offer a device that gave people a flagship expirience without the price. And in that sense, it succeeded to a point. Problem is that, like someone mentioned, we've seen an explosion of phones being introduced that aren't really making compromises but still retaining a lower price point.

It's almost like OPO was caught unaware of the phones that it will now be competing with. That isn't to say that it will be a piece of junk.. it will still be a very capable phone at an attractive price point. But it is now doing it in an increasingly croweded field. That's why I think there is all the backlash.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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Of course it is exaggerated... :) That's what blogs do.

I guess from my standpoint, the market has changed. When the OPO first dropped, it was a bit of a new approach. They were trying to offer a device that gave people a flagship expirience without the price. And in that sense, it succeeded to a point. Problem is that, like someone mentioned, we've seen an explosion of phones being introduced that aren't really making compromises but still retaining a lower price point.

It's almost like OPO was caught unaware of the phones that it will now be competing with. That isn't to say that it will be a piece of junk.. it will still be a very capable phone at an attractive price point. But it is now doing it in an increasingly croweded field. That's why I think there is all the backlash.

Yes, I agree.

The market has certainly changed.

The OnePlus One didn't really have competition that offered its hardware and performance in the same price point at its time. Now, there's 2 rivals and more coming.

It won't flop, but it'll be a tougher sell. OnePlus' goal of being a top 5 in the list of largest smartphone manufacturers is going to be tough.
 

Aquila

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Yes, I agree.

The market has certainly changed.

The OnePlus One didn't really have competition that offered its hardware and performance in the same price point at its time. Now, there's 2 rivals and more coming.

It won't flop, but it'll be a tougher sell. OnePlus' goal of being a top 5 in the list of largest smartphone manufacturers is going to be tough.
I think 5 is impossible; 10 might be rough.

M Dev Nexus 6 Assassin Edition. Gonfaloniere
 

LeoRex

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It won't flop, but it'll be a tougher sell. OnePlus' goal of being a top 5 in the list of largest smartphone manufacturers is going to be tough.

I can't see how they could even pretend that is an attainable goal. You have Samsung, Apple, Lenovo, Huawei, LG and Xiaomi.. Lenovo, Huawei, LG and Xiaomi are all in that 4.5% to 6.5% range... and while that's a tiny number, that's a TON of phones and all four of those companies have been going at it tooth and nail for years trying to eek out a little bit more market share.

And its not like they are all just going to stop selling phones. Huawei and (to a lesser extent) Xiaomi are both looking to make a push into the US Market. Huawei is going to have a coming out party of sorts when they come to market with a Nexus device, which I am sure is part of a broader effort to make a name for themselves here... and Xiaomi is most certainly going to watch that closely.

OnePlus needs to know its place... make a really good phone and sell it at a really good price and stop trying to be someone they are not. Otherwise, well, what happened last week (with Motorola pretty kicking sand in their face and stealing their girlfriend) will be commonplace.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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I can't see how they could even pretend that is an attainable goal. You have Samsung, Apple, Lenovo, Huawei, LG and Xiaomi.. Lenovo, Huawei, LG and Xiaomi are all in that 4.5% to 6.5% range... and while that's a tiny number, that's a TON of phones and all four of those companies have been going at it tooth and nail for years trying to eek out a little bit more market share.

And its not like they are all just going to stop selling phones. Huawei and (to a lesser extent) Xiaomi are both looking to make a push into the US Market. Huawei is going to have a coming out party of sorts when they come to market with a Nexus device, which I am sure is part of a broader effort to make a name for themselves here... and Xiaomi is most certainly going to watch that closely.

OnePlus needs to know its place... make a really good phone and sell it at a really good price and stop trying to be someone they are not. Otherwise, well, what happened last week (with Motorola pretty kicking sand in their face and stealing their girlfriend) will be commonplace.

I also thought that with their current strategy, they can't even get 6th place.

They can try, but they need to sell a ton of phones to get up there.

They probably need a wider smartphone portfolio.
 
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Ed Briggs

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I know that Android Pay is coming but all that is in the future. It (NFC) is going to gain widespread adoption in stores 12-18 months from now. By that time people will have moved on to the next device.[/I]"

Do you agree with the statement above?
I completely agree with it. I go shopping often and still have yet to see a "Google Pay" option, or whatever it's going to be called. It won't even start to be common until the OnePlus 3 comes out. People just want something that other phones have even if they're never going to use it. Ridiculous. It's just an excuse for people to complain, which has become a worldwide pastime on the internet. This world is becoming a very negative place to live in.
 

monsieurms

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T

Do you agree with the statement above?

I currently have no words for it, but I'll likely have one soon.

Article: OnePlus Carl Pei: another phone by Christmas & NFC is overblown - Android Authority

I disagree strongly, particularly because he's making it sound like he's going to profit off of leaving out a key feature so he can force people to spend more money to upgrade in the near future. This is why I always like to buy devices with all the bells and whistles. When I upgrade, I do it for something new, not because I got cheap and bought a low end piece of junk that makes me unhappy 90 days after I bought it. Do I use NFC much? No. But I have used it. And if I'm buying something and you have a company going backwards, that makes me nervous.

What he doesn't understand--similar to Samsung with Sd cards and batteries--is that high end devices offer lots of features to appeal to power users. None of them may be essential for EVERYONE, but POWER USERS buy high end devices so that they have frills, options, choices and room to grow with the device.

I guess he just doesn't have a high end device. That's what his statement says to me.
 

D13H4RD2L1V3

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I disagree strongly, particularly because he's making it sound like he's going to profit off of leaving out a key feature so he can force people to spend more money to upgrade in the near future. This is why I always like to buy devices with all the bells and whistles. When I upgrade, I do it for something new, not because I got cheap and bought a low end piece of junk that makes me unhappy 90 days after I bought it. Do I use NFC much? No. But I have used it. And if I'm buying something and you have a company going backwards, that makes me nervous.

What he doesn't understand--similar to Samsung with Sd cards and batteries--is that high end devices offer lots of features to appeal to power users. None of them may be essential for EVERYONE, but POWER USERS buy high end devices so that they have frills, options, choices and room to grow with the device.

I guess he just doesn't have a high end device. That's what his statement says to me.

That's what's in my mind as well.
Really, how is this a "2016 Flagship Killer" if it lacks even basic flagship features?