'How fast does your plain S22 charge with a 25 watt+ charger attached?

mike7877

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Below this writing will be a picture of the charger I bought.

And before that, the tl;dr:

~3050mA charge current with 15W
~4100mA charge current with 25W
What's your 25W charge speed?

(this number is found during a charge cycle at some point below 50%. New batteries, or well cared for batteries (batteries charged to 65% or less as often as possible which last 5 (or more) times longer than batteries topped up to 100%) might give accurate numbers during charging up to the mid 70s, but it's safest to observe all phones at or below 50 (keep things consistent!). One app, the app I like to use to maximize the life of all my phones' battery life, is called AccuBattery. It notifies you with a chime when your preferred maximum state of charge is reached (lower is better, if 65 gets you through the day, that's best, then 76. I wouldn't go above 85). The free version is almost as good as paid and has no ads- just less detailed historical logs visible). With Android 13 you can enable "Protect Battery", and your battery's state of charge will be limited to 85%. Limiting to 64% is almost four times better though, so depending on how long you want to keep your phone... (for reference, limiting to 85% will a bit more than double the amount of charges you'll get!)

I love spreading good news about batteries! lol
Continuing to the thread.... :)

I didn't get my S22 very long ago - middle of January. Reason being: I like to buy phones that have been out for 6+ months. By then, most of the potential security issues and all of the physical issues (like batteries that like to blow up!) have been figured out and fixed. My previous phone broke, so I had no control over how long after release I could buy my 22. I got a good deal on it though :)

Onto the question of charging!
Opening the box of my S22 was a surprising experience - I thought for sure what I'd see underneath would be a manual and a nice, new (possibly even shiny) 25 watt charger.
Nopeee!! There wasn't even a standard 15W charger. It appears that Samsung expects everyone to have an abundance of their chargers around from past purchases!
6
So I didn't give Samsung any more money to buy their 25 watt charger that should've come in the phone box -

I bought an "iCan" brand 45W USB charger at a local PC store instead, cost much less :)

I've noticed though... the average charge speed of my battery using the standard 15W charger with screen off is:
3050mA
For the 45W charger over-spec'd to provide the 25W that can be requested by the S22:
4090mA
just over a third faster...

This isn't over the whole charge cycle, either, so it's not from a slowdown at the top end (as typically happens and happens more and mdd20230530_003934.jpg
 
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fuzzylumpkin

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Bit surprised someone so anal about charging percentages is willing to fast charge at all.


Anyway, the rate at which your phone charges with a fast charger is not consistent and scales up depending on the battery percentage. It will charge the fastest below 20%.


What's more, in a modern PD fast charger it's not just the amperage drawn by the phone which changes but also the voltage supplied by the charger. So measuring the drawn amperage is not actually a good way to measure how fast the phone is charging. It could only be charging at 1 amp, but 1 amp at 20 volts.
 
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mike7877

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Bit surprised someone so anal about charging percentages is willing to fast charge at all.


Anyway, the rate at which your phone charges with a fast charger is not consistent and scales up depending on the battery percentage. It will charge the fastest below 20%.

Fast charge has the tiniest effect on battery longevity if during your charge cycles you stay within the constant current phase (it varies from internal resistance and as batteries degrade the number decreases, but usually this is below 60-70%.
 

mike7877

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What's more, in a modern PD fastd charger it's not just the amperage drawn by the phone which changes but also the voltage supplied by the charger. So measuring the drawn amperage is not actually a good way to measure how fast the phone is charging. It could only be charging at 1 amp, but 1 amp at 20 volts.

The charge speed remains the same below 60-70% at around 25W. This might decrease to 40-50 with 45W

Obviously you didn't read my post

The currents I provide are on the battery not the input...j
Sheesh!


edit: A+ for enthusiasm.
Everything else...

edit2: about your 0-20%...
If, if, the battery heats up too much during charge (from the display and CPU being used simultaneously, the charge rate will slow down. This happens when the battery approaches 40C, because charging at high temperatures is damaging, and charging fast at higher temperatures doubly so.

If you want to learn what happens with the battery in your phone, you should get the app AccuBattery from the Play Store.

If you have an S22 and can contribute to this thread, please do so. If not, your input isn't further required
 
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fuzzylumpkin

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The charge speed remains the same below 60-70% at around 25W. This might decrease to 40-50 with 45W

Obviously you didn't read my post

The currents I provide are on the battery not the input...j
Sheesh!


edit: A+ for enthusiasm.
Everything else...

edit2: about your 0-20%...
If, if, the battery heats up too much during charge (from the display and CPU being used simultaneously, the charge rate will slow down. This happens when the battery approaches 40C, because charging at high temperatures is damaging, and charging fast at higher temperatures doubly so.

If you want to learn what happens with the battery in your phone, you should get the app AccuBattery from the Play Store.

If you have an S22 and can contribute to this thread, please do so. If not, your input isn't further required

I have used ACCubattery in the past, you can't reallly get accurate readings from it in my experience. I also have and have used a multimetre and am familiar with the basics of electrical principles such as V*A=p. I've also familiarised myself with the very basics of how the PD charging standard works, and have gone to the trouble of performing my own testing, both for curiosity because I'm that kind of nerd and to answer peoples questions on here, because I'm that kind of nerd. But I don't have an S22, and you aren't interested in learning anything new, so I'll leave you alone. Good day :)
 
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mike7877

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I have used ACCubattery in the past, you can't reallly get accurate readings from it in my experience. I also have and have used a multimetre and am familiar with the basics of electrical principles such as V*A=p. I've also familiarised myself with the very basics of how the PD charging standard works, and have gone to the trouble of performing my own testing, both for curiosity because I'm that kind of nerd and to answer peoples questions on here, because I'm that kind of nerd. But I don't have an S22, and you aren't interested in learning anything new, so I'll leave you alone. Good day :)

Its readings are as accurate as the phone's battery management system. Some older phones only update power draw every 30-60 seconds instead of 2-3, but otherwise, very accurate. AccuBattery's average current is calculated using percentage increase, time, and battery capacity. As long as a phone's percentage reading is accurate, the reported avrage charge current will be within 5%.

If your experience is 0-20% being fastest, it's possible your phone's battery has degraded, making the constant current stage of the charge cycle shortened because its voltage rises to 4.2 very quickly (worn batteries have increased internal resistance which causes this). Or your battery temperature increases too quickly (from increased resistance) and the phone's bms (battery management system) slows charge to prevent unnecessary damage (quicker degradation from high temp charging)

I'm not looking for a technical discussion though. As I stated, I'm looking for anyone with an S22 to check if their charge current is reported higher than 4000mA when charging with 25W. This would need to be observed with something like AccuBattery with the battery charging between 0 and 60% - and less than 60 if battery is aged.

If you really want to know how lithium batteries behave, get yourself a CCCV power supply and charge LiIon directly (setting current to 80% capacity and voltage to 4.2). Watch how long it takes for the voltage to rise to 4.2, then for the current to fall to 20% of capacity (1000mAh battery, 200mA current). New batteries will fill to 80+% before the constant voltage stage of charging. When you increase current to 130% (an s22 charging with 25w) you'll see constant voltage will be reached around 60-70%. Of course there are small variations, but outside specialized batteries, this is what you'll see.