How Long Til' We See Cm7 or Honeycomb on the Kindle Fire?

How long until we see a custom Rom on the Kindle Fire?


  • Total voters
    0

JeremytheIndian

Well-known member
Oct 5, 2010
361
37
0
Visit site
You know it's gonna happen, but when? I think we should take bets on how many days, weeks or months it will take to crack this baby and unlock whatever extra potential there is waiting inside. :D
 

crescent

Well-known member
Apr 27, 2011
62
3
0
Visit site
depends on how fast the cm7 devs get their hands on it. i will bet it will be record speed as i anticipate this thing to FLY off the shelves.
 

bballben

Member
Sep 16, 2011
11
1
0
Visit site
If Honeycomb is able to be on the Fire, what exactly will this mean and why would you do it? Sorry I am a noob when it comes to this stuff. Any chance ICS will be on it when it comes out? Thanks
 
Aug 31, 2010
23
0
0
Visit site
It's a cheap device, so hopefully not too long. CM7 seems doable as Amazon's Android spinoff is supposed to be Gingerbread-based. But then I'm no dev, so what do I know. Give it a few weeks for something stable.

Honeycomb, not so likely. Closed-source and all that. Maybe Ice Cream in a couple of months.
 

rockstar323

Member
Mar 8, 2010
23
8
0
Visit site
I'm wondering how locked down it will be. I read that it uses close to the same internals as the blackberry playbook. I read an article a while back that the cost of parts for the playbook was around $200. It seems that Amazon doesn't care to make much off of the hardware and is focusing on making their money off of their software they add to it. That leads me to believe they're not going to want people to be able to easily remove it. I honestly hope that they leave it wide open and we get CM or ICS on it as soon as possible but idk.
 

frmorrison

Well-known member
Jul 15, 2011
258
13
0
Visit site
It seems the Kindle Fire guys are up for people rooting it so no locked bootloader. I thought Amazon was using a forked Android before, now I know it is just the open source Android with a custom UI overlay (like Sense and TouchWiz). So it will be a few weeks and the you can get CM7 on it.

The cost of parts for this tablet is around 200 + maybe 50 bucks for development and marketing. So Amazon is selling these at a loss but they will make up for it with content sales.
 

Spiral_ouT#AC

Well-known member
Aug 11, 2011
161
81
0
Visit site
I'm wondering how locked down it will be. I read that it uses close to the same internals as the blackberry playbook. I read an article a while back that the cost of parts for the playbook was around $200. It seems that Amazon doesn't care to make much off of the hardware and is focusing on making their money off of their software they add to it. That leads me to believe they're not going to want people to be able to easily remove it. I honestly hope that they leave it wide open and we get CM or ICS on it as soon as possible but idk.

Indeed that is what the parts would cost if YOU were building it. What those "break down and price out parts" websites fail to factor in is what RIM, Amazon, or any other OEM ACTUALLY pays for the parts. When the OEM's buy components, they don't pay retail, they get a discount for buying in extremely large quantities (obvious). How much they really pay for the parts is something that the OEM is rarely willing to release. That's why the figures that those types of websites release almost always show the OEM losing money.
 

mercado79

Well-known member
Nov 16, 2010
50
2
0
Visit site
it's hard to say especially since its been said that the fire won't have a microsd card slot or usb mass storage mode

They said you'll be able to load up the device with your own music, videos, etc. So, what makes you think no mass storage mode? Will they force people to use Amazon software to transfer files over?

It seems the Kindle Fire guys are up for people rooting it so no locked bootloader.

Who said?

Who actually manufactures this device? HTC? Sammy?

It's manufactured by an ODM, Quanta. They make generic products that vendors slap their names on to....usually laptops but they do design and build tablets too (such as the Blackberry Playbook).
 
May 15, 2010
17
0
0
Visit site
I don't think Honeycomb will happen, but a Tablet optimized Gingerbread with soft home, menu, and back buttons would be great. And maybe the devs can leave the amazon apps on their so that we don't.get heat from the Big A. Maybe they can extract the apk for Amazon VOD too. As long as it runs all the apps we want , quickly, do we need a custom rom?
 

bjn714

Well-known member
Apr 27, 2010
68
8
0
Visit site
Indeed that is what the parts would cost if YOU were building it. What those "break down and price out parts" websites fail to factor in is what RIM, Amazon, or any other OEM ACTUALLY pays for the parts. When the OEM's buy components, they don't pay retail, they get a discount for buying in extremely large quantities (obvious). How much they really pay for the parts is something that the OEM is rarely willing to release. That's why the figures that those types of websites release almost always show the OEM losing money.

Article from ZDNet this morning with some numbers. They are usually pretty good about fact-checking.
Amazon Kindle Fire: The math behind a subsidized tablet | ZDNet

Now to the on-topic response, I have read the PC Mag article and from that I gather that root may happen, but as for the bootloader being unlocked, doubt it. Probably have to use some sort of bootstrap situation. Lets hope it is unlocked or can be easily hacked/patched like HTC.
 

Highdefjunkie

New member
Oct 3, 2011
1
0
0
Visit site
You will not see honeycomb or any other Android upgrade on the Fire. Amazon built the OS on an earlier version of Android and going forward will be developing there own OS without the help of Google.


Christian
kindlejunkies.com
 

bjn714

Well-known member
Apr 27, 2010
68
8
0
Visit site
You will not see honeycomb or any other Android upgrade on the Fire. Amazon built the OS on an earlier version of Android and going forward will be developing there own OS without the help of Google.


Christian
kindlejunkies.com

Not officially. Honeycomb, not likely ever (nor do I see the point with ICS near) since the source was not released. ICS once the source is released, it could happen. The device is still capable of running the software despite being released with an Android-based OS. It all comes down to root and a way to load it. Amazon has stated that they are not taking any specific steps to block root. What remains to be seen is what it will take to root it and whether or not we can install a custom recovery or will have to use a bootstrapping method. In either case, unless the OS is VERY secure, it will happen at some point. If devs can get CM7 running on a Touchpad, this should be less difficult as there is much less hardware that needs working drivers and libs - no gps, cell radio, microphone, camera, etc.

It will happen.
 

placeman

New member
May 3, 2011
2
0
0
Visit site
I read that with that TI chip, Amazon could make it pretty difficult to unlock it if they wanted to. That's not to say a group of savvy devs aren't up to the task.
 

drd1135#AC

Member
Aug 8, 2011
9
0
0
Visit site
Jon Jenkins, the Silk director, says Amazon won't try to stop anyone from rooting the fire. he said something like "We can't stop anyone from rooting the Fire, and then it's their problem."
 

freeky1

Well-known member
Apr 16, 2011
485
28
0
Visit site
Why do people always want to get something for nothing? If you want a real Android tablet buy one. Don't expect the Fire to ever be a real Android tablet. It was never meant to be one.

Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
 

Forum statistics

Threads
943,801
Messages
6,920,136
Members
3,159,241
Latest member
jermz1084