News My new favorite outdoor hobby might force me to switch phones

JRDEMASKUS

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Aug 12, 2011
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This is easy enough. Buy a budget phone, used phone, or reuse a "retired phone", for primary use while you are "roughing it", keep your main device in airplane mode in your pack, assuming you have multiple lines available. Otherwise be prepared with a SIM tool to swap your SIM card between phones.
This is probably "Best Practice" if you really need to stay connected. Keep your "spare phone" charged up in your glove box or "Go Bag", when you don't immediately need it. If one phone gets trashed, you potentially have a spare, assuming you still have a SIM card available.
I'm sure you know a phone without a SIM card will still call 911
I see several "low cost", large capacity phones available online.
If you don't want to carry 2 phones, obviously have a power bank charger and connectors available
Ps. I never use "entertainment" while I'm out in nature. How can you hear everything if you are listening to something else. Do yourself a favor and turn off your media, and enjoy everything the environment is "playing" for you
 
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fastm3driver

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Feb 28, 2014
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Lol. Get a rog phone. Largest battery and out performs iPhones and Samsung by hours 🤷🏻 I walk around mocking everyone I'm with on all day adventures with mine. Also lighter than iPhone ultra last I checked. Or just get a big clunky battery pack.
 

pagrey

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In my opinion you don’t need a new phone and you don’t need to spend any money.
  1. On your Android phone download OsmAnd+ from Fdroid.
  2. Download offline maps for the region you are hiking from within OsmAnd.
  3. In OsmAnd settings set the location source as Android API.
  4. Turn on airplane mode.
  5. Under location services disable wifi scanning.
Most phones, even older ones with worn batteries will last days with this setup. Most people leave wifi on and use the Google Play Services for location so the phone is not only using the GPS for location. GPS takes very little power. It's unfortunate that it is so difficult to tell that the high power radios are being used on modern phones.
 

Hugo Minney

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Apr 17, 2015
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I feel for you. I use a Garmin forerunner for running, and put the phone in a belt (fanny bag?). I find that the phone battery life seems to be more affected by screen use than anything else - so listening to podcasts has barely any effect on battery, using GPS for the route and playing directions through my headphones doesn't use all that much power, but watching the map every step of the way is what really hammers battery life. Having to remember what the map looked like without getting it out again is probably good for the brain too
 

Altema22

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Dec 1, 2014
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Hilariously, I still use my old HTC U12+ when exploring by bike, and have no problems with the phone dying. Battery life is down a bit from new of course, but still fairly good.
 

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