Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge The first drop test is in

xocomaox

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Re: The first drop test is in

Wow, gorilla glass is strong.. I thought it would shatter at a lower height.

I read that the camera lens is sapphire crystal. Bogus or truth?
 

zipro

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Re: The first drop test is in

Sapphire crystal doesn't scratch easily but it breaks much faster than GG4
 

dpham00

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Re: The first drop test is in

It is glass... It is going to break. But overall impressive,imo for what it is.

Just a reminder, I wouldn't take this as a voucher that it would take a drop from any height... While it survived this test... Yours might not
 

ironass

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Re: The first drop test is in

I can't wait to see the iPhone 6S Plus vs Galaxy S7 Edge... "I DROPPED IT IN THE TOILET", test. ;)
 

LeoRex

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Re: The first drop test is in

It is glass... It is going to break. But overall impressive,imo for what it is.

Just a reminder, I wouldn't take this as a voucher that it would take a drop from any height... While it survived this test... Yours might not

This

These drop tests are all anecdotal... not repeatable. Now, if you took 100 new, out of the box phones and tried your best to recreate the exact same test, once, on each phone, then maybe the results would be a little bit more useful. Fact is that once you drop a phone, what happens next is anyone's guess. There is often damage at the microscopic level.

That being said.. yeah, the iPhone did a pretty good job. But I am not surprised. The glass on the iPhone isn't nearly as exposed as it is on the S7, a phone that, really, is just a slab of glass wrapped in a wee ribbon of metal. That the S7 did as well as it did here is a nice sign. But to be honest, if the phone isn't ruggedized, either with a decent case or one of the 'Active' type models, I assume any drop on a hard surface will most likely lead to some sort of damage.
 

bhatech

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Re: The first drop test is in

So pity that Samsung designs these beautiful phones only for 99% of the people to cover up in ugly cases. Got to ask is going glass on the back is needed.
 

LeoRex

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Re: The first drop test is in

So pity that Samsung designs these beautiful phones only for 99% of the people to cover up in ugly cases. Got to ask is going glass on the back is needed.

Yeah... this is one equation that I can't solve. I was at Disney recently, and the number of people that did not have their phones in a case was extremely low. And the ones that did either had the less expensive phones (lots of un-cased Moto Gs, for instance), or older phones that were already beat up (I lost count of how many shattered iPhone 5/5S screens I saw). Seeing a naked S6 or iPhone 6S+ was like seeing a unicorn.

So if nearly every customer slaps their phone in a case as soon as they take it out of the package, why bother? I mean, couldn't they save a lot of money and just make a durable chassis, one that replicates the protection of a case? Surely the buying public is savvy enough to recognize and appreciate this move.

Nope...

Those expensive and delicate chassis's are one of the primary selling point. Look at the current crop of 'flagships'. It's a sea of glass and aluminum. Had anyone eschewed those materials for a high quality and near bulletproof poly-carbonate skin, reviews would have howled about how cheap they felt and so on... People flocking into their carrier stores would probably walk right past the tough-as-nails phone and go to the shiny ones, buy them and then slap their Precious in a thick Otterbox tank-like shell, never to be seen again until it is time to replace it with another one.

But it is what it is.
 

ronin_cse

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Re: The first drop test is in

Yeah... this is one equation that I can't solve. I was at Disney recently, and the number of people that did not have their phones in a case was extremely low. And the ones that did either had the less expensive phones (lots of un-cased Moto Gs, for instance), or older phones that were already beat up (I lost count of how many shattered iPhone 5/5S screens I saw). Seeing a naked S6 or iPhone 6S+ was like seeing a unicorn.

So if nearly every customer slaps their phone in a case as soon as they take it out of the package, why bother? I mean, couldn't they save a lot of money and just make a durable chassis, one that replicates the protection of a case? Surely the buying public is savvy enough to recognize and appreciate this move.

Nope...

Those expensive and delicate chassis's are one of the primary selling point. Look at the current crop of 'flagships'. It's a sea of glass and aluminum. Had anyone eschewed those materials for a high quality and near bulletproof poly-carbonate skin, reviews would have howled about how cheap they felt and so on... People flocking into their carrier stores would probably walk right past the tough-as-nails phone and go to the shiny ones, buy them and then slap their Precious in a thick Otterbox tank-like shell, never to be seen again until it is time to replace it with another one.

But it is what it is.

It's almost like people don't generally act rational and are generally bad at making decisions ;).

To be clear: the build quality and feel of a phone are at least as important as everything else to me, and I generally use a case....so not saying I'm any better ;)
 

meyerweb#CB

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Re: The first drop test is in

The tradeoff is no wireless charging on the metal back.

While I don't think there's any doubt the 7 Edge is more fragile than the iPhone, dropping from 10 or 20 feet doesn't seem to mean much unless you repeatedly hang over a balcony while using your phone. And the comment above that these tests aren't repeatable is spot on. Depending on exactly how a phone lands, it could shatter badly, or show no damage at all from a drop from the same height. And once the glass has cracked, it's going to be far more susceptible to further cracks if dropped again, so comparing an already cracked phone to one that isn't cracked doesn't mean anything at all.
 

bable

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Re: The first drop test is in

Yeah... this is one equation that I can't solve. I was at Disney recently, and the number of people that did not have their phones in a case was extremely low. And the ones that did either had the less expensive phones (lots of un-cased Moto Gs, for instance), or older phones that were already beat up (I lost count of how many shattered iPhone 5/5S screens I saw). Seeing a naked S6 or iPhone 6S+ was like seeing a unicorn.

So if nearly every customer slaps their phone in a case as soon as they take it out of the package, why bother? I mean, couldn't they save a lot of money and just make a durable chassis, one that replicates the protection of a case? Surely the buying public is savvy enough to recognize and appreciate this move.

Nope...

Those expensive and delicate chassis's are one of the primary selling point. Look at the current crop of 'flagships'. It's a sea of glass and aluminum. Had anyone eschewed those materials for a high quality and near bulletproof poly-carbonate skin, reviews would have howled about how cheap they felt and so on... People flocking into their carrier stores would probably walk right past the tough-as-nails phone and go to the shiny ones, buy them and then slap their Precious in a thick Otterbox tank-like shell, never to be seen again until it is time to replace it with another one.

But it is what it is.


Socialology says that we've officially seen marketing beat consumerism over the last decade. It used to be about making the best product but now the winning tactic is making the most marketable product. What looks and feels good usually isn't a practical choice but practicality gets out sold by glitzy every time. Fragile phones incentivize either accessory, repair, or regular upgrade purchases despite being a bad deal for consumers their profitability is unmatched. Now that lg has given up plastic our choices for durability with flagship specs are pretty much nonexistent. Jobs won, Woz lost, all hail the note 4, the last great Samsung phone ;)
 
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SurfnSun

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Re: The first drop test is in

I am impressed by the durability of both phones. However, dropping them on a perfectly flat, clean surface would be an anomaly. A single pebble on the floor where the screen laned would have resulted in shattered screens on either phone would be my guess. Still impressive that a phone could be dropped from 20 feet and still have a a functioning screen.
 

throttlehappy

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For those concerned about the durability of the S7 Edge, here's a drop test.

Pretty good test of durability against the iPhone 6S plus. I'm not so concerned about durability after seeing this.

 

dpham00

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Re: For those concerned about the durability of the S7 Edge, here's a drop test.

Thanks for sharing
 

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