Why Honeycomb for Nookcolor

uflac1105

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I just got my Nook last week. It is stock from B&N. I did an update that was on the B&N site.
I see all these posts about Honeycomb and Android Market.
What are the benefits to having those. I am comfortable with gadgets but not too knowledgable about adding stuff, Rooting (which I read about) etc.
Is this stuff hard to do for someone that is not too saavy with the inner workings of such things.

Any help or guidance would be helpful
 

mrlingo

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Honeycomb, as well as the other methods covered in this forum, are mainly to turn your Nook into a full tablet. Your Stock Nook is very limited, intentionally by Barnes and Noble, but full blown Android is laying just underneath the surface.

I'm not too experienced with all of the rooting and with some patience was able to get Honeycomb on my Nook Color. Took some time, but I eventually got there. Now I'm running Stock Root, which I think has a definite easier process to get get done, but still gives me access to the Android Marketplace and what not.
 
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jeregano

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I rooted my stock and it is VERY easy. You just follow the very simple instructions to prep your nook and to download a file onto an SD card then place that SD card into your nook while it is OFF and then boot it up.

The advantage of the rooting is basically so you can
1) Get the Android Market
2) make changes to the user interface to make it more customizable.

The reason you may want the android market is for additional functionality. Basically with the market you can download any app you need to gain the functions you want. This is REALLY what sets an e-reader apart from a tablet. Do you need to take notes for work and it would be nice to do that on the e-reader? Plenty of app options for that (I use evernote). Do you want to transfer itunes music to your nook? A couple apps will do that. Want to put some pdf or doc files in a folder on your comp and have access to them on your nook to read on the couch? Dropbox will do that. These are just a few of the apps you can get out of the android market to increase the functionalities of your nook.

As for the increased customization of the UI that gives you a lot more control of your user experience. I use a launcher (kind of like a theme for windows with much more flexability) called Zeam that allows me to utilize one of my favorite things about the Android platform Widgets, which allow me to place things right on my home screen to give me immediate access to functions and info on my nook.

So that is the advantages of Rooting the stock Nook ROM (os).

Now some people are putting the updated Android OS Honeycomb (HC) on their nook. Currently this is a version of HC derived not from the full HC release but from a preview version released so that app developers can test their app functions (as I understand it). The advantages of this version of the OS is that it is INTENDED to be used on tablets (All previous versions of Android, including the Eclair that comes standard on the nook, are really an OS optimized for cellular phones) and so it has some tweeks to the way it works so that it is better for tablets. Some of these are simple little things like button placement. Android is optimized for having access to 3 or 4 buttons (aside from power and volume control) all the time. On most phones these are hardware buttons located just below the screen in portrait mode. If you shift the phone to landscape the buttons are still there on the side now, but a phone is small so this is no big deal to work with. The nook has 1 button (aside from the power and volume control) and the rest of these buttons are software solutions on the bottom of your sreen (the little back button that pops up there sometime, and the option to access you "library" and "extras" from your nav menu). In Honeycomb these buttons are software buttons that shift with the orientation of he device. This is nice for navigation in landscape mode and in portrait. That is one of the many little changes in HC that make it run better and be more usable for this form factor (though I think B&N did an excellent job making this form factor useful and with Softkeys, a software solution for those missing buttons you can use in SOME full screen apps that block access to the B&N options it is perfectly serviceable). There are some caveates to HC right now. It is not 100% fully baked right now and so somethings don't work exactly right. That is because it isn't made from the full download of the code for the operating system yet. A 100% baked HC should come in time but for now if you are like me, a rooting/hacking novice the best most stable way to go is to root the stock ROM and use it. It is very easy and very user friendly once it is done.

I hope that helped some.
 

uflac1105

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Mar 1, 2011
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I rooted my stock and it is VERY easy. You just follow the very simple instructions to prep your nook and to download a file onto an SD card then place that SD card into your nook while it is OFF and then boot it up.

The advantage of the rooting is basically so you can
1) Get the Android Market
2) make changes to the user interface to make it more customizable.

The reason you may want the android market is for additional functionality. Basically with the market you can download any app you need to gain the functions you want. This is REALLY what sets an e-reader apart from a tablet. Do you need to take notes for work and it would be nice to do that on the e-reader? Plenty of app options for that (I use evernote). Do you want to transfer itunes music to your nook? A couple apps will do that. Want to put some pdf or doc files in a folder on your comp and have access to them on your nook to read on the couch? Dropbox will do that. These are just a few of the apps you can get out of the android market to increase the functionalities of your nook.

As for the increased customization of the UI that gives you a lot more control of your user experience. I use a launcher (kind of like a theme for windows with much more flexability) called Zeam that allows me to utilize one of my favorite things about the Android platform Widgets, which allow me to place things right on my home screen to give me immediate access to functions and info on my nook.

So that is the advantages of Rooting the stock Nook ROM (os).

Now some people are putting the updated Android OS Honeycomb (HC) on their nook. Currently this is a version of HC derived not from the full HC release but from a preview version released so that app developers can test their app functions (as I understand it). The advantages of this version of the OS is that it is INTENDED to be used on tablets (All previous versions of Android, including the Eclair that comes standard on the nook, are really an OS optimized for cellular phones) and so it has some tweeks to the way it works so that it is better for tablets. Some of these are simple little things like button placement. Android is optimized for having access to 3 or 4 buttons (aside from power and volume control) all the time. On most phones these are hardware buttons located just below the screen in portrait mode. If you shift the phone to landscape the buttons are still there on the side now, but a phone is small so this is no big deal to work with. The nook has 1 button (aside from the power and volume control) and the rest of these buttons are software solutions on the bottom of your sreen (the little back button that pops up there sometime, and the option to access you "library" and "extras" from your nav menu). In Honeycomb these buttons are software buttons that shift with the orientation of he device. This is nice for navigation in landscape mode and in portrait. That is one of the many little changes in HC that make it run better and be more usable for this form factor (though I think B&N did an excellent job making this form factor useful and with Softkeys, a software solution for those missing buttons you can use in SOME full screen apps that block access to the B&N options it is perfectly serviceable). There are some caveates to HC right now. It is not 100% fully baked right now and so somethings don't work exactly right. That is because it isn't made from the full download of the code for the operating system yet. A 100% baked HC should come in time but for now if you are like me, a rooting/hacking novice the best most stable way to go is to root the stock ROM and use it. It is very easy and very user friendly once it is done.

I hope that helped some.

I guess I will give the rooting a try. Hope I don't mess it up. What size sd card should I get for this?
 

jeregano

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It doesn't take a large SD card to root. I just used the one I intended to use as my SD card in the nook as at the end of the instructions for rooting there are instructions to format the SD card. You want to use an SD card you are ok completely erasing. If you already have some date on an SD card for your nook and want to use that one in your nook later with the data intact DO NOT USE THAT ONE.

[GUIDE] How to Root Your Nook Color

The forum post listed above gives all the instructions, links, and information you need. You say you already got the update from the B&N so you have already done that part. (that was sideload_update.zip).

Read the instructions before you get started and it will give you a link to the program (Win32diskimager) you need and to the actual root file so you can accumulate everything you need before you get started. It also tells you the minimum SD card in the instructions. The good thing about the nook is that everyone says it is nearly "un-brickable" because you can boot off of the SD card. If you do have a problem, and it is fairly straight forward so you probably won't, there are directions here to completely start from scratch again.

Enjoy!
 

uflac1105

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I couldn't find anything but class 2 micro sdhc cards around my area. So I ordered a class 6 on line. It is supposed to be here on Friday. I will let you know how it goes and If I have any questions.
Thanks for all of your comments and insight
 

OB1J3D1

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I autonootered my NC. It was my first foray into the world of rooting android and all went well.

Just be sure to read the instructions well and you should be fine. If not, remember that it is apparently almost impossible to brick your NC. So, that should give you some peace of mind.
 

uflac1105

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This is my first Android anything! Been a Blackberry guy, kind of waiting for the ThunderBolt to finally arrive.
I do follow instructions well so I am hoping things go fine. I have updated the OS on my Blackberry a few times and that went OK.
 

Terrigno

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This is my first Android anything! Been a Blackberry guy, kind of waiting for the ThunderBolt to finally arrive.
I do follow instructions well so I am hoping things go fine. I have updated the OS on my Blackberry a few times and that went OK.

Ive done that with BlackBerrys many of times. If you did that and was fine, youll be fine with this. This is CAKE considered to doing that. Also, Rooting Android Phones in general is a more smoother process.
 
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uflac1105

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Mar 1, 2011
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Thanks to everyone for all of the information. I have successfully rooted my NC and now see why you would want to do that. So much stuff available!

One question: how do I get the apps I want to download to go to the micro sd card?