1. trter10-imore's Avatar
    Thought I'd share this due to my remembrance of how scared I was to root my TB the first time. I've since unrooted and re rooted at least 15 times.

    Scared of rooting due to warranty?

    [YT]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YcIHaajda8[/YT]

    Also, there is almost always a way to unroot even if you think that won't cut it.

    Scared of rooting because you think you might mess up?

    As long as you follow the directions, my tool and revolutionary are perfectly safe.

    Scared of rooting because you've never done it before?

    All I can say for this is: there's a first time for everything. You'll always be scared if you don't try it once.

    Scared because you think you'll be alone?

    I'm usually available at lukeafrazier@gmail.com for questions and troubleshooting.


    Happy rooting.
    07-04-2012 08:46 PM
  2. paintdrinkingpete's Avatar
    Good post, but there are valid reasons to be hesitant to root as well. Keep in mind that I rooted my Thunderbolt manually way back in April of 2011, so obviously I have no problem with it, but I don't think folks should be blindly advised to root their phones either...here's why:

    1. It does void your warranty.

    This makes perfect sense -- rooting your phone *should* void the warranty! Neither Verizon nor HTC should be responsible to for what you do to the device or provide support for it should you decide to run anything other than the "official" software. These phones are heavily subsidized, and Verizon does (arguably) a pretty decent job with customer support -- but they are 100% within their rights to refuse support if you decide to install your own firmware (even if it is technically better than the official crap they put out there).

    Granted, you can always UN-root if you need to, but there's always a chance that your phone will end up in state where that can't be done (i.e. hardware damage that prevents the phone from booting).

    If you decide to root your phone, you need to willing to accept the fact that there is a chance you will need accept full responsibility for those actions...even if those odds are highly unlikely.

    2. Updates.

    When you root your phone and modify the software running on it (and why else you rooting if not to do that?), then you also are making the conscious decision to take managing the software on your phone into your own hands. Most folks who root are very clear on item #1 above, but many don't realize the implications of this item when they decide to root their phone.

    No longer can you simply go into the Options screen and check for OTA updates...and if you are able to attempt to install an OTA update, it will most likely leave you with a semi-bricked phone. Essentially, if you need to update the software on your phone, you'll need to either un-root first (which I don't believe is the best or most efficient way, but it will work), or you need to download and install the updated OS yourself or use a ROM with the updated files included.

    Again, for many of us that have rooted phones, this is standard practice that we're used to, but for some folks who root just to remove bloatware or get free tethering it isn't that obvious, and EVERY time Verizon posts a new update, there are always a handful of threads here from folks who are like, "I'm running stock and rooted and just installed the latest OTA and now my phone is in a boot-loop!"

    Bottom line: If you root, you should be prepared to manage the software and updates on the device yourself.

    I've had many friends ask if I could root their phone for them, and I always give them the same answer: "no, but I'll help walk you through it if you want" ... and then explain the points I made above -- because if I don't, I can also assume that a few months down a road I'm going to get a frantic phone call asking what's wrong with their phone and how can I fix it!

    I actually wrote an FAQ (link in my signature) a while back that touched on these points. Again, I'm obviously not against rooting...in fact I highly recommend it if you want to get the most out of your device, nor am I trying to argue the points you make in the OP, but I do feel it would be irresponsible to recommend rooting to anyone without first outlining the risks and responsibilities involved. Just my 2.
    waker, RobCMass, scott750 and 1 others like this.
    07-05-2012 09:59 AM
  3. trter10-imore's Avatar
    Good post, but there are valid reasons to be hesitant to root as well. Keep in mind that I rooted my Thunderbolt manually way back in April of 2011, so obviously I have no problem with it, but I don't think folks should be blindly advised to root their phones either...here's why:

    1. It does void your warranty.

    This makes perfect sense -- rooting your phone *should* void the warranty! Neither Verizon nor HTC should be responsible to for what you do to the device or provide support for it should you decide to run anything other than the "official" software. These phones are heavily subsidized, and Verizon does (arguably) a pretty decent job with customer support -- but they are 100% within their rights to refuse support if you decide to install your own firmware (even if it is technically better than the official crap they put out there).

    Granted, you can always UN-root if you need to, but there's always a chance that your phone will end up in state where that can't be done (i.e. hardware damage that prevents the phone from booting).

    If you decide to root your phone, you need to willing to accept the fact that there is a chance you will need accept full responsibility for those actions...even if those odds are highly unlikely.

    2. Updates.

    When you root your phone and modify the software running on it (and why else you rooting if not to do that?), then you also are making the conscious decision to take managing the software on your phone into your own hands. Most folks who root are very clear on item #1 above, but many don't realize the implications of this item when they decide to root their phone.

    No longer can you simply go into the Options screen and check for OTA updates...and if you are able to attempt to install an OTA update, it will most likely leave you with a semi-bricked phone. Essentially, if you need to update the software on your phone, you'll need to either un-root first (which I don't believe is the best or most efficient way, but it will work), or you need to download and install the updated OS yourself or use a ROM with the updated files included.

    Again, for many of us that have rooted phones, this is standard practice that we're used to, but for some folks who root just to remove bloatware or get free tethering it isn't that obvious, and EVERY time Verizon posts a new update, there are always a handful of threads here from folks who are like, "I'm running stock and rooted and just installed the latest OTA and now my phone is in a boot-loop!"

    Bottom line: If you root, you should be prepared to manage the software and updates on the device yourself.

    I've had many friends ask if I could root their phone for them, and I always give them the same answer: "no, but I'll help walk you through it if you want" ... and then explain the points I made above -- because if I don't, I can also assume that a few months down a road I'm going to get a frantic phone call asking what's wrong with their phone and how can I fix it!

    I actually wrote an FAQ (link in my signature) a while back that touched on these points. Again, I'm obviously not against rooting...in fact I highly recommend it if you want to get the most out of your device, nor am I trying to argue the points you make in the OP, but I do feel it would be irresponsible to recommend rooting to anyone without first outlining the risks and responsibilities involved. Just my 2.
    Very true!
    I guess I didn't make it obvious enough that it was geared more towards people who were about to root but backed out
    Also, the thing about ota updates I had covered in the tool, as it blocks them as part of the root process.

    But very good points!


    Sent from my Jailbroken iPad 3 using Tapatalk
    07-05-2012 11:13 AM
  4. Green_Laser's Avatar
    great stuff guys

    the tool is cool

    and the added info from pete is good to know too (for those looking to root)
    trter10-imore likes this.
    07-05-2012 03:44 PM
  5. defcon999's Avatar
    great stuff guys

    the tool is cool

    and the added info from pete is good to know too (for those looking to root)
    +1 = this tool is amazing. As long as you know how to read english and you know some BASIC facts of the TBolt (recovery, bootloader). You need per se to know...but if you can follow GREAT instructions....anyone can do it!.
    trter10-imore likes this.
    07-05-2012 04:56 PM
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