1. methree's Avatar
    I watched the whole live feed of the Galaxy Nexus with ICS launch. We all know the phone has a 1.2Ghz chip, 16-32G storage, 5mp camera, 17XXmah battery, high ppi., etc. We also know about the network activity monitoring, panarama pictures, face unlock, and all sorts of other goodies. My question is how much is ICS and how much is Nexus. Sure, all the physical stuff plus lack of bloatware is Nexus, but how much of the other stuff is ICS that will be available for other phones. Once ICS hits other phones, what will make the Galaxy Nexus special other than it's shape and screen?
    11-05-2011 09:22 AM
  2. jdbower's Avatar
    The Nexus should be the "pure Google experience" so it should be all available to manufacturers. However, manufacturers are free to pick and choose which features they use. For example, Moto hasn't been using the AOSP camera and have had panorama for ages.
    11-05-2011 09:29 AM
  3. Mooem's Avatar
    Well all the software is ICS. All the capabilities on the Nexus will be features available to other phones as well. Nexus is simply a showcase for the new OS. As far as I know, nothing on there is exclusive to the Nexus brand.

    What makes it special is that there will be no extra software, bloatware, carrier services, etc. Updates will be much quicker than other phones because they come from Google. It should also be unlockable and developer friendly.
    11-05-2011 09:32 AM
  4. dapercy's Avatar
    If you do a search of phone prices on ebay you'll also notice the Nexus phones have better resale value than the other droid phones which become almost worthless after 18 months of existance.
    11-05-2011 09:57 AM
  5. oxymoron's Avatar
    As an aside, I just wanted to throw out there that it is not a 1.2ghz chip. The kernel they are using in this build of ICS has it clocked at 1.2ghz. The chip can be clocked to 1.5ghz safely, according to TI. With undervolting and overclocking, I see this operating stable at 2.0ghz in the future.

    http://focus.ti.com/general/docs/wtb...emplateId=6123

    Is that clock speed "necessary", or battery friendly? No. I just dislike this chip continually being described as a 1.2ghz chip (often described as a negative, in comparison to other devices) when it is being underclocked. It IS a 1.5ghz chip... as stated by the manufacturer. Google has underclocked it (glad they have btw, I don't think we need any higher clock speed with optimization and hardware acceleration).

    Not directing this right at you OP, just a general observation of how this processor is decribed.... just chose right now to respond to it. Sorry, kind of off topic....

    Back to it... yes, the continual TIMELY updates, along with unparalleled developer support are two main reasons a Nexus is the better choice for an Android enthusiast. And... this Nexus happens to be on VZW, with LTE. Yes, please.

    I personally have NEVER been this excited about a device.

    *customized tapatalk signature*
    11-05-2011 10:26 AM
  6. elvisgp's Avatar
    As an aside, I just wanted to throw out there that it is not a 1.2ghz chip. The kernel they are using in this build of ICS has it clocked at 1.2ghz. The chip can be clocked to 1.5ghz safely, according to TI. With undervolting and overclocking, I see this operating stable at 2.0ghz in the future.

    http://focus.ti.com/general/docs/wtb...emplateId=6123

    Is that clock speed "necessary", or battery friendly? No. I just dislike this chip continually being described as a 1.2ghz chip (often described as a negative, in comparison to other devices) when it is being underclocked. It IS a 1.5ghz chip... as stated by the manufacturer. Google has underclocked it (glad they have btw, I don't think we need any higher clock speed with optimization and hardware acceleration).

    Not directing this right at you OP, just a general observation of how this processor is decribed.... just chose right now to respond to it. Sorry, kind of off topic....

    Back to it... yes, the continual TIMELY updates, along with unparalleled developer support are two main reasons a Nexus is the better choice for an Android enthusiast. And... this Nexus happens to be on VZW, with LTE. Yes, please.

    I personally have NEVER been this excited about a device.

    *customized tapatalk signature*
    This should be someone's signature, just to shut all of the trolls up.

    Sent from my amazing galaxy tab 10.1 which also eats ipads
    11-06-2011 01:27 AM
  7. methree's Avatar
    As an aside, I just wanted to throw out there that it is not a 1.2ghz chip. The kernel they are using in this build of ICS has it clocked at 1.2ghz. The chip can be clocked to 1.5ghz safely, according to TI. With undervolting and overclocking, I see this operating stable at 2.0ghz in the future.....

    Not directing this right at you OP, just a general observation of how this processor is decribed.... just chose right now to respond to it. Sorry, kind of off topic....
    No offense taken. It's a valid point, but as true as that is, most people (not on this forum) will not make any changes to the phone, so it is what is, which is 1.2 GHz. It's just like my Pontiac G8GT, they rate it at 361hp. It practically has a corvette engine. Mine has 650hp and soon to have 700 on plain ole 92 octane gas. Showroom floor stock however is how 90% people still drive them, with 361 measly hp (355 for those using 87 octane gas}. But like you said, with everything about the phone being optimized, 1.2 is probably plenty. That's how that aforementioned 90% field feel about their G8's. Then there is the issue of something going wrong after modification. Now what? I will likely leave the phone stock like most people will.
    11-06-2011 08:02 AM
  8. titanoman's Avatar
    No offense taken. It's a valid point, but as true as that is, most people (not on this forum) will not make any changes to the phone, so it is what is, which is 1.2 GHz. It's just like my Pontiac G8GT, they rate it at 361hp. It practically has a corvette engine. Mine has 650hp and soon to have 700 on plain ole 92 octane gas. Showroom floor stock however is how 90% people still drive them, with 361 measly hp (355 for those using 87 octane gas}. But like you said, with everything about the phone being optimized, 1.2 is probably plenty. That's how that aforementioned 90% field feel about their G8's. Then there is the issue of something going wrong after modification. Now what? I will likely leave the phone stock like most people will.
    Not to change the subject, but how about a picture of that Pontiac?

    Sent from T-mobile Galaxy S2 (Hercules)
    11-06-2011 08:11 AM
  9. methree's Avatar

    Back to it... yes, the continual TIMELY updates, along with unparalleled developer support are two main reasons a Nexus is the better choice for an Android enthusiast. And... this Nexus happens to be on VZW, with LTE. Yes, please.

    I personally have NEVER been this excited about a device.

    Based on all I've seen, I too am very excited about this phone. I personally don't care about it having a lower clocked processor or lesser MP camera. From what I've seen so far, neither seems to be a negative. I really like the look of the phone, the ridiculous HD screen, vanilla flavoring, an the non-permanent screen buttons. Those last two things are things that will not be on current android phones updated with ICS.

    My predicament is that this will be a Verizon phone. I have unlimited data and a 17% discount with AT&T. I hoping to hear that this phone will be coming to AT&T, but even so, I doubt it will be LTE. So my original post was trying to see what I could salvage from the Nexus in another phone. I really like a lot of the OS features. If I bought an current AT&T phone I was just trying to get an idea, how much of what I saw in the Nexus/ICS presentation could be carried to another phone once updated to ICS.

    That's for the responses, guys.
    11-06-2011 08:18 AM
  10. CynicX's Avatar
    I'd be curious if the zero shutter lag will transfer to other phones when the get ICS. A lot of manufactures already use there own camera software and no one has done it yet aside from the GN.
    11-06-2011 08:22 AM
  11. methree's Avatar
    Not to change the subject, but how about a picture of that Pontiac?

    Sent from T-mobile Galaxy S2 (Hercules)
    PM Sent
    11-06-2011 08:23 AM
  12. bplewis24's Avatar
    what will make the Galaxy Nexus special other than it's shape and screen?
    All of the development taking place on it and how easily hackable it will be (presumably on both counts).

    Brandon
    11-06-2011 08:37 AM
  13. jdbower's Avatar
    Shutter lag is probably be as much hardware as it is software. Via software you can prefocus, but hardware image buffering is probably more important. Case in point, the Rezound seems to advertise zero shutter lag as well according to this chart. This is really impressive since the $7500 Nikon D3X has a 41ms shutter lag. I think the people measuring this are the same guys claiming faster-than-light neutrinos
    edglock21 likes this.
    11-06-2011 09:25 AM
  14. altimax98's Avatar
    Zero shutter lag... I've got a question about it. Is it a hardware thing or software. Wouldn't 0 shutter lag be able to be accomplished by having the viewfinder recording and recording the millisecond the shutter button was pressed and saving that frame? More of a trick then actual zero shutter lag?
    11-06-2011 10:44 AM
  15. ShinyTop's Avatar
    If I get the pic on my screen at the moment I tell it to take I do not care what form of trickery anybody is pulling.
    11-06-2011 10:48 AM
  16. altimax98's Avatar
    If I get the pic on my screen at the moment I tell it to take I do not care what form of trickery anybody is pulling.
    I agree... I wasn't meaning it in a bad way I just want to know how it works
    11-06-2011 11:40 AM
  17. goldkear's Avatar
    I'm suprised nobody seems to have mentioned this to the op: yes once other phones get ICS they will have many of the features that the nexus has, but aside from the lack of bloatware, the nexus will always have the latest version of android. Even IF other devices get updated, it won't be for months at best, and will always be a few minor versions behind. The thunderbolt JUST got gingerbread (again) almost a year after nexus S launched.
    11-06-2011 01:12 PM
  18. methree's Avatar
    I'm suprised nobody seems to have mentioned this to the op: yes once other phones get ICS they will have many of the features that the nexus has, but aside from the lack of bloatware, the nexus will always have the latest version of android. Even IF other devices get updated, it won't be for months at best, and will always be a few minor versions behind. The thunderbolt JUST got gingerbread (again) almost a year after nexus S launched.
    Yep, it's been mentioned and it is a concern to some degree. I have a iphone 3G. Every time an upgrade came out, it would be a month or so before I actually loaded it on my phone. I actuality, the somewhere down the line the OS grew too new for the phone and slowed it down. I may have to revert to an older version. It's going to be just an ipod for me once I get a new phone, so no big deal there. But just based on my history with the iphone, updates are usually no huge concern for me unless there are bugs in that the update will fix. I willing to wait for updates, but it would be nice to have them as soon as Google releases them.
    11-06-2011 02:31 PM
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