1. taylorz_412's Avatar
    So I am happy with my tbolt I'm rooted and loving it but I justt want to try an iPhone everyone that I know that has one seems so happy should I jump ship or stick around with the android comunity that i know and love?

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    10-21-2011 03:16 PM
  2. Mordecaidrake's Avatar
    I tried the 4s, and returned it 3 days later. You can't use it as a flash drive, you can't put anything on it without iTunes, and it has zero customization. I thought the grass might be greenier on the other side, I was way wrong. I'd stick with the Bolt.
    JerseyDubbin and Alma like this.
    10-21-2011 03:19 PM
  3. JerseyDubbin's Avatar
    You will get frustrated with the limited app integration as well. You will definitely miss your tbolt, especially rooted. I have a 4 and the tbolt and my phone has been relegated to only work phone calls. I even use my tbolt for work email because i like the stock exchange app better.
    10-21-2011 03:44 PM
  4. Mordecaidrake's Avatar
    You will get frustrated with the limited app integration as well. You will definitely miss your tbolt, especially rooted. I have a 4 and the tbolt and my phone has been relegated to only work phone calls. I even use my tbolt for work email because i like the stock exchange app better.
    This! That was another pet peeve, sharing anything on that phone sucked.
    10-21-2011 03:59 PM
  5. natehoy's Avatar
    So I am happy with my tbolt I'm rooted and loving it but I justt want to try an iPhone everyone that I know that has one seems so happy should I jump ship or stick around with the android comunity that i know and love?

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    I realize that it's hard to compare Apple and Android without starting a religious skirmish, but here goes anyway. First, I don't think one is inherently better than the other, it's what you want to do with it that counts.

    The big iPhone plusses have to do with simplicity and consistency. Apps have to go through a vetting process and (in general) have to at least have a similar look-and-feel to the base iOS user interface. Nothing is allowed to change the base user interface. There is a small set of fixed resolutions that developers have to develop for. Only one company compiles iOS for use in their hardware, and that is Apple. The user interface will always be the same, so you can walk up to any iPhone and in about .00001 seconds be utterly confident using it if you've ever used any iOS device before. Music, once you've loaded it into iTunes, is a brain-dead cinch to load to your iPhone. All of this can be done with almost no knowledge of computers at all.

    The big Android plusses have to do with configurability, flexibility, and hardware specs. Since many vendors have access to Android, they can pair it with different hardware choices (not just "do you want 16GB, 32GB, or 64GB", but different choices in screen sizes, different cameras, different form factors, physical keyboards, processors, etc etc). The upside to this is you have a really good chance of finding a phone that meets your individual needs, rather than choosing from a single model of phone with the only variable being how much memory is soldered on.

    This array of choice in a competitive marketplace means choosing the right Android is a little more work. Hardware vendors may load their own user interfaces which may or may not resemble other vendors' solutions. Hardware vendors might cheap out and not put enough memory, or install features they don't fully support or support many months after release in software updates (*ahem* front facing camera *ahem*).

    Apple spends a great deal of time designing a consistent, predictable, specific look and feel to iOS with a highly consistent set of features. They insist that no one can change that look and feel. And if that look and feel are acceptable to you and the built-in features are OK, then an iPhone is an excellent choice. I can take the lessons learned in my iPod Touch Generation 2 and almost every base feature that existed in that works the same way in the iPhone 4S, and will probably work "close enough" in the iPhone 9Q that I can just walk up to it and figure it out in a few seconds.

    With Android, you can go nuts loading new launchers, new dialers, hell even a new operating system on most (not all!) models. You can customize the phone to your heart's content. But if you get a new one made by a new manufacturer or even one loaded with a custom launcher, you might find there's a learning curve, because your deep knowledge of Sense UI might not apply to something running Go Launcher or Blur or whatever.

    Personally, I like the freedom of choosing hardware specs (iPhone screen is too small to support a screen-based keyboard for my large hands), the freedom to change the UI (trying out different keyboards to see what I like, playing with different launchers), and not needing to have iTunes (no Windows or Mac machine to run it on anyway). I don't need to install anything on any computer to use my phone.

    With that, I accept that loading music to my Android is a little more work (nothing "manages" it for me, I use a file manager and mass storage support to drag-and-drop what I want on there). I accept that the OS might have rough edges like needing to know I need to create a folder called "ringtones" to use my own MP3s as ringtones. I accept that my phone is not automatically and completely backed up every time I plug it into my home computer.

    These are costs I gladly pay for a phone that I have more control over.

    They may not be costs you want to pay.

    Go to the store, take a demonstration iPhone off the shelf, and play with it. Spend some time with it. Make a few calls. Send a few texts to your current phone. Type the opening paragraph to your new novel. Videoconference. Ask yourself if this phone, as it stands, is something you want to spend some time using. Ask yourself if you have a machine that can run iTunes and if you really want to have to install it, with the benefit being that app and music management gets a lot easier in return.
    msokad, NotJustAPhone and rocco225 like this.
    10-21-2011 04:07 PM
  6. taylorz_412's Avatar
    Its such a hard decision to make the make the iPhone so appealing when I know il be missing a few things from android

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    Chiefmcfuz likes this.
    10-21-2011 04:57 PM
  7. FrankXS's Avatar
    So I am happy with my tbolt I'm rooted and loving it but I justt want to try an iPhone everyone that I know that has one seems so happy should I jump ship or stick around with the android comunity that i know and love?

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    To me, it's not about the "community", it's about the phone. Just my opinion. Maybe the dev community, but not the forums in general.

    Personally, I am so happy I have reached a plateau with my TBolt. Basically, "everything just works". Using the stock OTA Gingerbread and VZW Visual Voicemail. Boring, I know But besides everything just working, I also have the latest Flash technology (great for the plethora of websites that use Flash LOGIN SCREENS now) and the latest 4G technology (great for those emails with attachments and downloading PDFs that you need, etc.). Love Blockbuster and Netflix and NFL Mobile on the big 4.3" screen. And, without "buffering", due to the 4G network. It sure is nice using the FREE turn by turn speaking navigation provided by Google. It's good that Wifi is not required for video chat.

    I dunno if I'd call it a "chance" to get an iPhone

    Not for me. I'm as happy as a fly on.... err... a pig in.... err... well, pretty happy now!

    -Frank
    10-21-2011 05:40 PM
  8. taylorz_412's Avatar
    i know 4g lte and the big screen would be the biggest things i would miss but i dont know if i can leave this phone its just grown on me and i love the freedom of android and being rooted im thinking im gonna really have to think this one over
    10-21-2011 05:49 PM
  9. mightyfacundo's Avatar
    What about the iPhone appeals to you so much? What about the Thunderbolt don't you like? You seem to genuinely like your Bolt, so I'm wondering why you're itching to make the switch.
    10-21-2011 07:42 PM
  10. dragonsamus's Avatar
    You should try it. It sounds like you want to. Just remember, the grass is not always greener.
    10-21-2011 08:46 PM
  11. RideMadone#AC's Avatar
    I have an iPhone for work and my personal phone is the TB. I really like both phones, but if I had to pick one it would be the TB. I have 4G where I live and could not give it up. If I never had a 4G phone, I would probably be happy with the iPhone.
    10-21-2011 09:02 PM
  12. oberkc's Avatar
    My experience with iOS is with the iPad. I have never had an iPhone. Still, I think they are pretty close.

    I am sure the iPhone is nice, but it is not without faults. Lack of selection of configuration (screen size, keypads). No widgets. Absolutely cumbersome methods for sharing of files. Doesn't play well with non-apple infrastructure (DLNA, network drives).

    Unless there is some particular feature or characteristic you are looking for, I would not assume that an iPhone is the answer to whatever problems you are having. More likely, you will just discover some other kinds of problems.

    If you just want to try it out of curiosity...well...have fun.
    10-23-2011 09:49 AM
  13. CMYMUD's Avatar
    Itunes would be the deal breaker for me.
    10-23-2011 10:34 AM
  14. kylep23's Avatar
    Also, if you are staying with verizon, the iphone won't do talk and data at the same time.

    Im running bamf forever 1.09 with ics themed adw and roboto font. I love looking at it. If i didn't, i could change it.
    With my extra battery, i get about 40 hours of use.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    10-23-2011 05:45 PM
  15. Treknologist's Avatar
    One thing you should be aware of with the iPhone, is that ever since they upgraded to iOS 5, they are having issues with battery life. I know that we have those issues with Android phones but we can change batteries if we need to. You cannot do that with the iPhone. Here is a link where you can read about the issue and some recommendations for dealing with it. They will sound familiar...

    http://www.imore.com/2011/10/23/fix-...s-5-iphone-4s/

    It is your decision, of course, but I would never leave the TBolt for an iPhone. I own an iPod Touch (which was a company gift) and I swear I want to kill it with a sledgehammer every time I use it. LOL The one button navigation drives me nuts.
    10-23-2011 07:43 PM
  16. Mike_is_Mike's Avatar
    So I am happy with my tbolt I'm rooted and loving it but I justt want to try an iPhone everyone that I know that has one seems so happy should I jump ship or stick around with the android comunity that i know and love?

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    Wait for the iPhone5.
    10-23-2011 08:12 PM
  17. jeslevine's Avatar
    So I am happy with my tbolt I'm rooted and loving it but I justt want to try an iPhone everyone that I know that has one seems so happy should I jump ship or stick around with the android comunity that i know and love?

    sent from my BAMFD BOLT using tapatalk
    I have an Iphone4 and a Thunderbolt. Nothing is like 4G LTE. Unfortunately, the iPhone 4S does not have LTE.

    If you have the Thunderbolt then you must be on Verizon. If you plan to stay with Verizon, I would wait until the iPhone implements LTE, just my 2 cents

    The pros on the iPhone 4/iphone 4S are better display in sunlight, superb construction, excellent battery, and backed by the best warranty in the business

    The cons on the iPhone 4/Iphone 4s, limited customization, no LTE

    The Display is also smaller on the iPhone than the Thunderbolt, and the battery cannot be removed from the iPhone
    10-23-2011 09:49 PM
  18. worwig's Avatar
    It has a cute little display. You should get it. Maybe in a cute pink case.
    (that is a joke originated from a coworked that brags about how great it is to have a small iPhone display)

    If you don't know the differences, maybe you SHOULD get a locked down iPhone and be told what you can and can't do.

    If you do know the differences, then you wouldn't be asking.
    10-24-2011 08:26 AM
  19. stingray389's Avatar
    Switched from an OG Droid to an Iphone 4. I love the way the phone "just works." The hardware is built around the software, which gives a very reliable and consistent user experience. The battery life is outstanding, even without playing without the settings. The apps seem more polished, playing with my droid and the iphone, using the same apps side by side on each phone, the iphone's version of apps seem to produce a richer experience.

    That being said, the lack of widgets can be annoying. I want to look at my home screen and see what the outside temperature is, not open a weather app and wait for it to load to give me information which should be right there. I know is ios 5 you can look at the weather by pulling down the notifications screen, but that brings up my next point: lack of app integration. Apple fans were celebrating when ios 5 was announced because of "deep system" integration with twitter. All that means is if you look at a picture in the photo gallery, and want to post it to twitter, you can within the gallery app. If you want to post the same picture to facebook, or a blog site, you have to leave the gallery app, open the facebook/blog app, and post the picture from there. Android has always allowed this integration of any apps with the system. The apps on an Iphone provide a good experience, at the cost of them acting in a stand alone manner: they don't cooperate well with each other or the OS for that matter.

    The reason an iphone, IMO, allows for the experience it provides is because of the system and app segregation. This provides the stability that people have come to expect with those phones. One of the big reasons Siri is so popular on the Iphone is because it allows different system apps to interact with each other. Siri, however does not allow 3rd party apps to interact with ios.

    Hope this helps
    10-25-2011 10:58 AM
  20. Small_law's Avatar
    iPod Touch + Android phone is the way to fly. The iPod isn't as fast as iPhone 4 or 4S and the camera is awful, but you can scratch an itch for trying out iOS with it.
    10-25-2011 11:06 AM
  21. ddsdavid's Avatar
    My wife had to have the iPhone 4S so I bought her one and carried it for a few days.

    My dislikes are the following: Punny screen that is difficult to type on. She has the same issue. Email notification sucks, no LED notification. Siri is kind of cool but Google voice search is as accurate, just not as intuitive. No Flash support. I did side by side speed tests in 3G and the Tbolt was slightly faster every time. In 4G the Tbolt blows it away. Apps even load faster on the Tbolt which surprised me since the 4S is dual core.

    At the end of the week I handed over the 4S to her and have not picked it back up. I just liked the Tbolt much better. This is my first Anroid phone so I am not an Android die hard either!
    10-27-2011 10:42 AM
  22. FrankXS's Avatar
    My wife had to have the iPhone 4S so I bought her one and carried it for a few days.

    My dislikes are the following: Punny screen that is difficult to type on. She has the same issue. Email notification sucks, no LED notification. Siri is kind of cool but Google voice search is as accurate, just not as intuitive. No Flash support. I did side by side speed tests in 3G and the Tbolt was slightly faster every time. In 4G the Tbolt blows it away. Apps even load faster on the Tbolt which surprised me since the 4S is dual core.

    At the end of the week I handed over the 4S to her and have not picked it back up. I just liked the Tbolt much better. This is my first Anroid phone so I am not an Android die hard either!
    Amen. There is so much over-hype (is that a word?) about Dual Core it is pathetic. Dual Core is but one single potential performance enhancer. Unless all the other performance related factors are lined up, it makes no difference. And, it wastes memory using additional memory just to manage the Dual Core configuration.

    Nothing surprising here. I think we've got another couple years of evolution before Dual Core will help much on a cell phone.

    -Frank
    10-27-2011 10:50 AM
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