1. colonelcack's Avatar
    Just ordered a standard LG battery as a replacement for my optimus v, the old one was starting to show it's age.

    What's the best way to get the most life out of my new battery? Let it charge to 100% and then do a full discharge? Is this something that should be done more than once, and should I wipe the battery stats too? Or anything else?
    01-27-2012 08:25 PM
  2. Wixspin's Avatar
    Honestly if you are going to maintain the battery life, don't plug it into the charger until it's under 20%.. Having it plugged in all the time will deteriorate the battery life faster.. I know there are a few good battery apps out there too. I also keep wifi off if I'm not anywhere near a wifi connetion, this helps stop the phone from scanning and helping with battery life, you could also put it in airplane mode when you have no signal or if you're in a meeting, work, school etc.... Having automatic updates off and any other app you think that doesn't need to be running could conserve the life of the battery... Hope this helped!
    01-27-2012 08:45 PM
  3. MasterTec's Avatar
    Honestly if you are going to maintain the battery life, don't plug it into the charger until it's under 20%.. Having it plugged in all the time will deteriorate the battery life faster.)
    While this was true for the old Ni-Cad and NiMh batteries, this advice is flat out wrong for these modern Lithium Ion batteries.

    These batteries actually prefer to have a constant trickle charge... in other words CHARGE IT WHENEVER YOU CAN. The phone's circuitry will prevent overcharging and these batteries do not develop the "memory" that older battery technologies did.
    Eollie, kwknott, Wixspin and 1 others like this.
    01-27-2012 11:09 PM
  4. Wixspin's Avatar
    While this was true for the old Ni-Cad and NiMh batteries, this advice is flat out wrong for these modern Lithium Ion batteries.

    These batteries actually prefer to have a constant trickle charge... in other words CHARGE IT WHENEVER YOU CAN. The phone's circuitry will prevent overcharging and these batteries do not develop the "memory" that older battery technologies did.
    That's good to know!
    01-28-2012 09:19 AM
  5. watskyhotsky's Avatar
    best thing you can do is keep the old one charged as a back up for trips and stuff.

    a second battery, even if it doesnt hold as much charge, is far, FAR more valuable than any battery life you can squeeze out of the new one alone.
    Eollie likes this.
    01-28-2012 03:18 PM
  6. Eollie's Avatar
    best thing you can do is keep the old one charged as a back up for trips and stuff.

    a second battery, even if it doesnt hold as much charge, is far, FAR more valuable than any battery life you can squeeze out of the new one alone.
    This is truth.
    01-29-2012 09:18 AM
  7. colonelcack's Avatar
    These are good things to know...but I was mostly wondering about the first couple charges on a new battery. Aren't you supposed to let it charge 100% and then let it go all the way till it dies, and do this a couple times? Or is this really not necessary?
    01-29-2012 06:49 PM
  8. LeslieAnn's Avatar
    Li-Ion batteries actually prefer to stay around mid charge.
    The further you stray from that, the sooner they wear out. However, going to low is much, much worse. Letting it go actually dead, can kill the battery which is why it warns you so much as you get low. Batteries ship with a 50% charge for this reason, this is also why leaving them sit on a charger constantly is bad, they want to return to 50% and go dormant.

    If you bought a generic Chinese battery, expect 1-2 years at most. OEM's typically last 25-50% longer, depending on how you treat it. Generic ones also usually have 10-20% less capacity given equal ratings and easier to kill by letting them go dead. OEM's can usually handle this a few times, depending on severity, generics can die the very first time they go dead.

    Do NOT let the first charge go all the way down, that is an old Ni-cad thing. DO NOT do this on a li-ion, it was only done on ni-cads to prevent "memory". However, on the first charge, even if it says it's at 100% do not remove it, this applies to all batteries, give it a few extra hours. The last bit takes more effort and longer to fully charge, especially the first time, think of it as breaking it in. Li-Ion batteries go into a dormant state and it needs to wake up, not doing so will cripple the battery some as it will later refuse to access that last bit. This and letting it go dead are the two biggest things people do wrong with Li-ion batteries. Fully charge it the first time and don't let it go dead and it should last a long time.

    Also, Li-Ion do not trickle.
    Once they charge, the charging stops, I was surprised when I heard this, but plug your phone in before going to sleep and leave it plugged in as long as you can, you will actually see it start to discharge even as it sits on the charger. When it reaches a certain point it will begin charging again (some systems do, some don't, our phones do).

    For those curious, nihm batteries were actually better in some ways as they don't have the memory issues of Nicads (they have it, just much less), don't die when they get low (dead is still death), and can trickle. The only real downsides to them was that they were much more subject to damage from being dropped and of course less capacity compared to li-ion, which is what ultimately did them in.



    I also second the spare battery.
    I have a plug in battery I got when I got the phone, it's designed to sit fully charged for long periods (works on anything usb), and I also bought two generic ones from China for $10 (Ebay). I highly recommend the latter. The plug in battery is nice because it sits a long time and works on anything, but the spare batteries are small, cheap and fit inside the phone. For $10 they were also half the price and came with a charger, I hardly use them now that we have better roms, but they were worth it.
    colonelcack likes this.
    01-29-2012 07:24 PM
  9. mzxeternal's Avatar
    My old stock battery decided to rupture a week ago, and I had no choice but to get hijacked at the sprint store for a new one, $50! (I couldn't wait for an order). But I have noticed the new battery holds a way better charge than the old one ever did, even new.

    Suffice to say, I did order a second one from Amazon... same stock battery, $8.01.

    And the reps at the Sprint store were very emphatic on the fact there were no returns or refunds, ugh.
    01-29-2012 07:33 PM
  10. colonelcack's Avatar
    Li-Ion batteries actually prefer to stay around mid charge.
    The further you stray from that, the sooner they wear out. However, going to low is much, much worse. Letting it go actually dead, can kill the battery which is why it warns you so much as you get low. Batteries ship with a 50% charge for this reason, this is also why leaving them sit on a charger constantly is bad, they want to return to 50% and go dormant.

    If you bought a generic Chinese battery, expect 1-2 years at most. OEM's typically last 25-50% longer, depending on how you treat it. Generic ones also usually have 10-20% less capacity given equal ratings and easier to kill by letting them go dead. OEM's can usually handle this a few times, depending on severity, generics can die the very first time they go dead.

    Do NOT let the first charge go all the way down, that is an old Ni-cad thing. DO NOT do this on a li-ion, it was only done on ni-cads to prevent "memory". However, on the first charge, even if it says it's at 100% do not remove it, this applies to all batteries, give it a few extra hours. The last bit takes more effort and longer to fully charge, especially the first time, think of it as breaking it in. Li-Ion batteries go into a dormant state and it needs to wake up, not doing so will cripple the battery some as it will later refuse to access that last bit. This and letting it go dead are the two biggest things people do wrong with Li-ion batteries. Fully charge it the first time and don't let it go dead and it should last a long time.

    Also, Li-Ion do not trickle.
    Once they charge, the charging stops, I was surprised when I heard this, but plug your phone in before going to sleep and leave it plugged in as long as you can, you will actually see it start to discharge even as it sits on the charger. When it reaches a certain point it will begin charging again (some systems do, some don't, our phones do).

    For those curious, nihm batteries were actually better in some ways as they don't have the memory issues of Nicads (they have it, just much less), don't die when they get low (dead is still death), and can trickle. The only real downsides to them was that they were much more subject to damage from being dropped and of course less capacity compared to li-ion, which is what ultimately did them in.



    I also second the spare battery.
    I have a plug in battery I got when I got the phone, it's designed to sit fully charged for long periods (works on anything usb), and I also bought two generic ones from China for $10 (Ebay). I highly recommend the latter. The plug in battery is nice because it sits a long time and works on anything, but the spare batteries are small, cheap and fit inside the phone. For $10 they were also half the price and came with a charger, I hardly use them now that we have better roms, but they were worth it.
    Thank you!! Very helpful...

    Do you recommend wiping the battery stats before the new battery's first charge as well?
    01-29-2012 07:47 PM
  11. LeslieAnn's Avatar
    My old stock battery decided to rupture a week ago, and I had no choice but to get hijacked at the sprint store for a new one, $50! (I couldn't wait for an order). But I have noticed the new battery holds a way better charge than the old one ever did, even new.

    Suffice to say, I did order a second one from Amazon... same stock battery, $8.01.
    Another good reason for having a spare, even if it's a generic.
    My new phone I have coming has a spare battery coming right behind it. They are handy to have under normal circumstances, and cheap insurance for those times things happen.

    Thank you!! Very helpful...

    Do you recommend wiping the battery stats before the new battery's first charge as well?
    Wipe after it while plugged in and FULLY charged.

    Then do it again after it has been used a bit, batteries need to settle in.
    mzxeternal likes this.
    01-29-2012 07:48 PM
  12. colonelcack's Avatar
    Another good reason for having a spare, even if it's a generic.
    My new phone I have coming has a spare battery coming right behind it. They are handy to have under normal circumstances, and cheap insurance for those times things happen.


    Wipe after it while plugged in and FULLY charged.

    Then do it again after it has been used a bit, batteries need to settle in.
    Sorry, a bit confused on the wording...after switching out the old battery and putting the new one in, let it boot up normally and fully charge? THEN do the battery stat wipe without unplugging it and let it charge more? Or am i misreading what you said...
    01-29-2012 07:59 PM
  13. LeslieAnn's Avatar
    Sorry, a bit confused on the wording...after switching out the old battery and putting the new one in, let it boot up normally and fully charge? THEN do the battery stat wipe without unplugging it and let it charge more? Or am i misreading what you said...
    Sorry, I was thinking 3 steps ahead of my typing.

    Let the new battery fully charge for a few hours after it says full, then go into recovery and wipe battery stats while still on the charger.
    colonelcack likes this.
    01-29-2012 08:18 PM
  14. colonelcack's Avatar
    Sorry, I was thinking 3 steps ahead of my typing.

    Let the new battery fully charge for a few hours after it says full, then go into recovery and wipe battery stats while still on the charger.
    Thanks for clarifying...letting it charge now!
    01-30-2012 04:55 PM
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