1. Android Central Question's Avatar
    It lets you set the front and rear camera. Also, for the 4: 3 option and the 16:9 option there is 2 options / size. For example an option for the 4:3 is 2576x1932, and the other is 2048 x1536. That is for the rear camera, then the front camera picture size set to 4:3 has only an option of 1616 X 1212. The 16x 9 option is 1600 x 900. What does all this mean? I really want the best quality picture for a 4 x 6 hard copy picture. I send them in the mail as postcards.
    01-24-2018 07:46 PM
  2. chanchan05's Avatar
    Any of them has the same actual quality. They're just being cropped.
    01-24-2018 08:16 PM
  3. Dano1200r's Avatar
    Any of them has the same actual quality. They're just being cropped.
    Some advice is worth what you pay for it and this is a good example.
    Go to the camera settings, and depending on your storage, ie adding and saving photos and videos, save to an SD CARD and pick the Highest Resolution feasible.
    They do not have the same amount of data if you choose a low resolution and you will have garbage grainy pictures following the poster aboves advice.
    I'm currently for video using 1080 x1920 which is HD minimum. For photos I use 5mega pixels. Play around and see what you like.
    01-24-2018 08:56 PM
  4. chanchan05's Avatar
    Some advice is worth what you pay for it and this is a good example.
    Go to the camera settings, and depending on your storage, ie adding and saving photos and videos, save to an SD CARD and pick the Highest Resolution feasible.
    They do not have the same amount of data if you choose a low resolution and you will have garbage grainy pictures following the poster aboves advice.
    I'm currently for video using 1080 x1920 which is HD minimum. For photos I use 5mega pixels. Play around and see what you like.
    Uh, not sure what you mean there, but what I'm saying is truth. To achieve thr 16:9 ratio, the phone just turns off extra pixels. In essence the photo taken with the 16x9 ratio is just the same as getting the photo taken with the the 4x3 ratio then cropping of the top and bottom parts. They're the exact same photo. You can try it out for yourself. The pixel density of a photo cropped from the highest resolution avalilable and the smaller resolution.

    The OP is asking for photo quality. The photo quality for both options is the same. The only difference is that the height of the photo is different allowing for a bigger view.
    01-24-2018 09:05 PM
  5. Dano1200r's Avatar
    If you would simply look at the storage a HD Pic uses, 9mb or more, and compare it to a 200kb picture which relies on digital zoom, you will understand better. Do some Google research on resolution and we can talk.
    01-24-2018 09:15 PM
  6. chanchan05's Avatar
    If you would simply look at the storage a HD Pic uses, 9mb or more, and compare it to a 200kb picture which relies on digital zoom, you will understand better. Do some Google research on resolution and we can talk.
    What are you talking about? He's talking about the option of 4x3 vs 16x9. We're not talking about digital zoom. I know how digital zoom works. You don't seem to know how the different aspect ratios work. It just crops out the section of the sensor that corresponds to the pixel density and aspect ratio required.

    Your argument only works if the camera is taking the exact same image at different resolutions. For example, shooting a 4x3 12mp photo vs a. 4x3 6.2mp photo in the options. But if we're talking about the options between the top 4x3 photo vs the top 16x9 photo option, quality is exactly the same, the 16x9 photo only has sections cropped out because both options are using the sensors at full capacity.

    In the attached photo for example, the 12mp 4x3 and 9mp 16x9 options have the exact same photo quality except for the size of the resulting shot because of cropped out areas. See the pixel density on the side. Both options have the same pixel width but different pixel height. It's also obvious when you take a picture using either options because you will find areas at the top and bottom cropped off when comparing.

    Your explanation only works if we're comparing the the 4x3 choices, since that's taking the exact same picture at different resolutions. While you are correct, it's not the question being asked. The question was, should the person take pictures using a 4x3 ratio or a 16x9 ratio. Hence my answer stands. For both aspect ratios, the quality is the same. The only thing in question is whether the shape of whatever he needs them for fit one or the other ratio better.
    01-24-2018 10:25 PM
  7. chanchan05's Avatar
    I don't know if the server allows upload at full quality (if it doesn't then maybe they'd have varying quality due to compression)

    I have two attached photos, one in the 12mp 4x3 ratio, and the other in the 9mp 16x9 ratio.

    As long as you keep the subject centered, the quality of the image remains the same because no digital zooming occurs. However, the 4x3 picture is bigger in file size because it's viewfinder is taller, hence there are more details to save. This is due to missing areas on the top and bottom of the picture. This can be best seen in the billboard whose top can be seen in the 4x3 pic, but cropped in the 16x9 pic.

    Basically, setting the pic from 4x3 to 16x9 is simply taking scissors to a 4x3 pic.

    In terms of image quality, both images retain the same level of quality. Whether or not you need the top and bottom swaths that the 16x9 ratio removes is up to you.
    01-24-2018 10:52 PM
  8. Dano1200r's Avatar
    I was waiting for the r
    response. I know they only want a small pic now, so to the eye of the recipient it may look the same.
    I won't argue with anyone who believes that a picture taken in High Definition, with all of its data saved in the form of a jpeg, has the same optical quality as a picture which is over the air VHF TV quality.
    Have a nice night.
    01-24-2018 11:34 PM
  9. chanchan05's Avatar
    I was waiting for the r
    response. I know they only want a small pic now, so to the eye of the recipient it may look the same.
    I won't argue with anyone who believes that a picture taken in High Definition, with all of its data saved in the form of a jpeg, has the same optical quality as a picture which is over the air VHF TV quality.
    Have a nice night.
    Who says I think that? Don't put words in my mouth for you not understanding the question in the first place and you don't know how things work.
    01-24-2018 11:48 PM
  10. Dano1200r's Avatar
    'I really want the best quality picture for a 4 x 6 hard copy picture. I send them in the mail as postcard'
    Check the screenshot of the man disagreeing. Once you locate it in the camera settings, choose 2576x1932.
    01-25-2018 06:41 AM
  11. mountain2's Avatar
    I understand the importance of high resolution so I prefer not to get into a discussion about this. I understand that a 3:2 photo ratio gives the same ratio as a 6x4 photo (the old 35mm comparison). However, the Galaxy S7 unfortunately does not offer a 3:2 ratio and I'm tired of manually cropping all my 4:3 ratio photos before printing as 6x4. Is the 16:9 ratio any better?
    I wish Samsung would do an update to allow the logical (for most people) 3:2 ratio.
    03-24-2019 09:41 AM
  12. ManiacJoe's Avatar
    I understand the importance of high resolution so I prefer not to get into a discussion about this. I understand that a 3:2 photo ratio gives the same ratio as a 6x4 photo (the old 35mm comparison). However, the Galaxy S7 unfortunately does not offer a 3:2 ratio and I'm tired of manually cropping all my 4:3 ratio photos before printing as 6x4. Is the 16:9 ratio any better?
    I wish Samsung would do an update to allow the logical (for most people) 3:2 ratio.
    6x4 = 12:8 = 13.5:9

    Since neither the 4:3 nor 16:9 is the same as 6x4, both options require you to crop the image for the shape that you want. Thus, you should start with the most pixels available, which should be the 4:3 shape.
    03-24-2019 03:18 PM
  13. Rukbat's Avatar
    The "the logical (for most people)" ratio these days is 16:9. Almost no one (by comparison) uses 35mm cameras any more. If you want to print a 6:4 picture, you're going to have to crop. Visually crop for 6X4 when you're taking the picture, then crop it before printing it. (I know, I know - I used to do my own color slides in my own darkroom too, used 5274 film because 100 foot rolls were cheap and dodge and burn from my enlarger - but it's 2019.)
    03-24-2019 03:52 PM

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