1. Ry's Avatar
    I've always had an admiration for the work that Motorola has put into their mobile phones. Check my phone history. Save for a Sony Zuma (sort of a flip phone) and a BlackBerry Bold 9000 (the best BlackBerry ever, IMO) issued by work, I've never used anything other than a Motorola as daily driver.

    But Motorola couldn’t capitalize on the original Motorola RAZR V3 with it’s variants and Windows Mobile on the MOTO Q wouldn’t be enough to keep up with the explosion smartphone market Apple brought with the introduction of the iPhone. Motorola leaned on Google and Android and has found somewhat steady sales success on Verizon but not much elsewhere.

    Eventually, Motorola would be purchased by Google and has now been put in position to compete directly with the flagships of other smartphone manufacturers. Verizon is still going to lean on Motorola for DROID phones - they are now the exclusive DROID maker (no more DROID Incredibles by HTC, DROID Charges by Samsung). But in an effort to compete on every (U.S.) carrier, Motorola has brought out the Moto X.

    Connectivity - Calls//Wi-Fi/Cellular Data - Business as usual

    Motorola has long has this perception of using excellent radios in their devices. In my experience, the Moto X lives up to this hype. Testing calls to an iPhone 5 on Verizon, I could hear the caller loud a clear and they had no issues hearing me. I have not experienced calls cutting in and out with my Moto X.
    On Wi-Fi, I have had no negative experiences with the Moto X. I stay connected with good throughput. I have not experienced an random drops.

    Cellular data appears to be strong. I have the same excellent connectivity I had on my DROID Bionic. The Moto X performs well on Verizon’s 4G LTE network - which I pretty much have access to in my normal day-to-day in Southern California.

    Size. Specs. Software.

    In many ways, the Moto X is an anti-flagship. It’s very much the iPhone of the Android world. The phone has been slammed for not having a Snapdragon S600, instead going with the “older” Snapdragon S4 Pro dual-core. This appears to have no made a difference in real-world use. Apps open in a quick, timely manner. There’s no lag or stuttering switching through the launcher or the home screens. Looking at the spec sheet, the S4 Pro in the Moto X uses a dual-core Krait 300 likely similar to the quad-core Krait 300 used in the Snapdragon S600. Graphics are powered by a quad-core Adreno 320. RAM is inline with everyone else at 2GB. There’s 16GB of space on the phone and since Moto Maker isn’t yet available for Verizon customers, the only way to get a 32GB version on Verizon is buy the Developer Edition direct from Motorola.

    The Moto X also caught some flack for not going with a 1080 display. The Moto X uses a 4.7” 1280x720 SAMOLED instead. The display checks in at around 316 pixels per inch. For comparison, the iPhone 5 is around 326 PPI and tha Galaxy S4 is around 441 PPI. But guess what? The display still looks great. Text is smooth. And anything around 300 PPI is good enough. Some people say that they can tell the difference (on 720 vs. 1080). I’d rather have 720 on a device at this physical size and rather than waste power on pixels that are hardly noticed.

    Motorola pushed edge-to-edge in last year’s DROID RAZR M and RAZR i. They’ve taken that philosophy with them to the Moto X. While the display is 4.7”, the bezels have been minimized. Overall dimensions are 5.09 x 2.57 x 0.41 inches. Compare that to the iPhone 5S (4.87 x 2.31 x 0.30 inches) and HTC One (5.41 x 2.69 x 0.37 inches). Against the iPhone 5S, the Moto X gets you a much larger display (4” vs. 4.7”) while still being pocketable and comfortable to use one-handed. Against the HTC One, you’ll have the same size display, in a tighter package. Granted, the HTC owes it’s height to it’s front-facing BoomSound speakers but Motorola has never been a slouch when it comes to audio quality. Even placed on the back, audio from the Moto X’s rear speaker is loud, crisp, and clear.

    Staying thin has been a trademark design of Motorola since the original RAZR V3. Packed into the Moto X is a 2200 mAh battery. It’s not a 3000+ mAh monster that Motorola likes to stick in phones called the MAXX. But it’s more than adequate. To get the curve which makes the Moto X feel great in the hand, the Moto X uses a stepped battery design. I can get a full day’s use out of it but Motorola’s got some tricks up it’s sleeve to help you with battery life.

    I’ve already mentioned the Moto X’s AMOLED display. Taking advantage AMOLED, Motorola has introduced Active Display. Gone is the notification LED that has become a standard on most Android phones. The Moto X breathes. When you get a notification with the screen off, the screen lights up - but only the necessary pixels. It’s almost watch-like, glanceable information. This feature is aided by a contextual computing processor, which handles gestures. Need to check the time? Slip the phone out of your pocket and look at the screen. Active Notifications kick in and the time is displayed on the screen. No need to press a power/wake button to turn screen completely on.

    The other piece Motorola added to their implementation of Android is Touchless Control. Essentially it’s an upgraded version of existing voice control. “Send SMS to Jerry, I’m on my way.” But instead of needing to touch the phone to activate the voice command features, all you need to do is say “OK Google Now” first. “OK Google Now. Remind me to buy milk the next time I’m at Target”. Without physically touching the phone, you’ve now just set yourself a reminder. Touchless Control is powered by another companion processor - a natural language process that’s always listening. Gimmick? You’re likely to not use it around other people but alone in the car is one of the best use cases for this feature. It’s worked well for me.
    Motorola calls this combination of processors the Motorola X8 Computing System - dual-core main CPU, quad-core GPU, plus the the contextual computing processor and natural language processor.

    New on the Moto X is Motorola Assist, somewhat of an evolution of Motorola’s Smart Actions. Instead of manually setting your “Smart Actions”, Motorola Assist tries to anticipate what actions to take in a Google Now-like automatic way. Motorola Assist has modes for Driving, Meetings, and Sleeping.

    For Driving, the contextual computing processor comes into play here detecting when you’re on the road. It can be set to send a text message automatically to tell your contacts that you’re driving. It can read your text message out loud. The Meetings and Sleeping modes work similarly, checking your calendar and setting your quiet time so that you’re not disturbed while in an important meeting or catching up on beauty rest.

    The Moto X also allows for Trusted Bluetooth devices. Passcodes, pattern locks, PINs - people should be using these security measures to lock their phones down. But it gets tedious. Most people find that extra time a waste. With Trusted Bluetooth, your security can be disabled as long as your phone and Bluetooth device are connected. This works great in the car and nice if you like to leave a Bluetooth headset in your ear all the time. I hear it works great with a Pebble as well.

    The Android OS that the Moto X has launched with is Jelly Bean 4.2.2, which the Android faithful have had concerns about since Motorola is a Google company. Why didn’t it launch with Android 4.3? If you understand phone development timelines, you’d know why. Google and Motorola are making it clear that a firewall exists between the Motorola and the Android group and that Motorola isn’t getting special treatment relative to Android’s other partners.

    There are two key features from Android 4.3 that people should want - and they’re both behind the scenes. TRIM and Bluetooth Low Energy. And guess what? Motorola’s added their implementation of those features into their build of Android 4.2.2. Couple that with Google Play Services plus the fact that Google putting their apps in the Play Store makes it feel like the actual version of Android is irrelevant.

    Camera, better than before - but is it good enough?

    The Moto X features a 10 megapixel clear pixel (RGBC) camera with LED flash on the rear and a 2 megapixel camera on the front. Both shoot 1080p video. The 10MP rear camera is much better than the 8MP shooter Motorola seemed to be sticking in everything since I believe the DROID X. The camera interface is very minimalist.

    According to Motorola, users weren’t going in and change their camera settings often. Motorola’s research indicated users just wanted to get into their camera quickly. Aided by the contextual computing processor, Motorola has introduced a twisting gesture to easily launch the camera that they call Quick Capture. Essentially, you twist the twice phone like you would twist a doorknob. It’s one of the fastest ways to launch a camera on any smartphone - literally you can twist once the phone leaves your pocket and have the camera up and ready once you got the phone in position to take your shot.

    Camera quality is generally good though Motorola has released an update that improves image quality (not yet available for Verizon Wireless users). Examples can be found in the Photos thread. You can take good photos with this phone. It just may take some work.

    The Smarter Smartphone?

    Expectations are high for every new phone. It seems like everyone is looking for mind-blowing innovation when manufacturers are cranking out iterations. But here’s the thing - the Moto X has fundamentally changed how I use a smartphone in significant ways. Active Notifications, Quick Capture, and Trusted Bluetooth have made me use the Moto X in ways I’ve never used a smartphone.

    The Motorola Moto X is more than just specs (or lack of specs). It proves you don’t need to have the latest and greatest specs to have a smooth and fluid smartphone experience. It proves you don’t have to be a gigantic phone to have a great Android experience. It feels great in the hand and still works fine in one-handed use. It tries to solve real world issues with innovative software and hardware. It tries to be the smarter smartphone. I think Motorola has succeeded with this product. This is an excellent start for the new Motorola as a Google company.
    10-18-2013 04:06 PM
  2. tdizzel's Avatar
    Did you write this whole thing? Are you auditioning for a job on AC?
    Nicely done, very well written

    Posted via Android Central App
    10-18-2013 04:36 PM
  3. Ry's Avatar
    Did you write this whole thing? Are you auditioning for a job on AC?
    Nicely done, very well written

    Posted via Android Central App
    Yep. And nope. I'm just practicing for myself. Next up will be a camera comparison once Verizon and Motorola pushes the update out and probably accessory reviews of the Motorola Skip and Diztronic case I'm using.
    shanghai and rayden8 like this.
    10-18-2013 05:11 PM
  4. davidnc's Avatar
    Info remember you from other mototola threads.I think one of the first threads i saw your profile name in was Moto DX thread.
    Btw I had a Moto Q and a Moto DX ha
    Actually the only Motorola smartphones I had tho was the DX and now the Moto X.
    Hands up the Moto X is Definitely a much better phone then the DX even tho the DX for its day was suppose to be a high spec smartphone and Moto X is not .
    But the Moto X of today( even tho tech. Its not high spec.phone) out performs the DX of yesterday ha

    sent from Moto X
    10-18-2013 06:15 PM
  5. still1's Avatar
    To get the curve which makers the Moto X feel great in the hand
    every moto X users say this, but I really didnt understand why, but Damn!!!
    after using it for few days this thing really does feel great in the hand.

    S4, One, G2 dont even come close to this. I really hope people understand how great this phone is.
    Ry and Aquila like this.
    10-18-2013 06:30 PM
  6. Ry's Avatar
    every moto X users say this, but I really didnt understand why, but Damn!!!
    after using it for few days this thing really does feel great in the hand.

    S4, One, G2 dont even come close to this. I really hope people understand how great this phone is.
    Really though. For most people, it just fits perfectly like it's supposed to be in your hand.
    benhmadison likes this.
    10-18-2013 06:53 PM
  7. ericizzy1's Avatar
    nice review, GREAT phone for anyone, child or adult
    Ry likes this.
    10-18-2013 07:28 PM
  8. Pollster's Avatar
    Great review, and thanks. The only statement I take issue with is "Motorola isn’t getting special treatment relatively to Android’s other partners."
    HTC has shown you don't need any special treatment to put 4.3 on your favorite product right now.
    Not that I need 4.3 right now.
    10-18-2013 07:29 PM
  9. Ry's Avatar
    Great review, and thanks. The only statement I take issue with is "Motorola isn’t getting special treatment relatively to Android’s other partners."
    HTC has shown you don't need any special treatment to put 4.3 on your favorite product right now.
    Not that I need 4.3 right now.
    HTC (and Samsung) make GPe devices. The assumption with GPe is that you're getting earlier access to the next version of Android.
    10-18-2013 07:36 PM
  10. mayconvert's Avatar
    This says it all. Great review. This would be what I would say in my own review, so thanks for doing all the work =p
    My last Motorola was the original Razor (when AC/DC back in black commercial was used) going iPhone for many years after the Razor.
    I have tried a few android, but none of them seem to hold my attention long, or maybe I was too busy comparing it to the iPhone that I didn't get the full enjoyment out of them.
    The Moto X has changed my view of what a smartphone should be. You described everything perfectly so I won't repeat all of it.
    It fits in the hand beautifully, performs flawlessly without lag, and the touch free system is incredible, as well as the 'breathing' display.
    People who judge the phone based off specs, are truly missing out on something special.

    Your statement that this is the iPhone of the android world is spot on. The Moto x gives Apple a reason to go back to the drawing board.
    I am starting to believe that Apple is loosing it's magic. Maybe it died with Steve Jobs. They seem more worried about a rainbow interface and flat icons than actually doing any real innovation like the Moto X.
    Aquila, weksa, Ry and 1 others like this.
    10-20-2013 01:33 PM
  11. danielcee3's Avatar
    To me it feels awkward to hold makes my hand fall asleep. The phones too small for me.

    Posted via Android Central App
    10-20-2013 06:50 PM
  12. Ry's Avatar
    This says it all. Great review. This would be what I would say in my own review, so thanks for doing all the work =p
    My last Motorola was the original Razor (when AC/DC back in black commercial was used) going iPhone for many years after the Razor.
    I have tried a few android, but none of them seem to hold my attention long, or maybe I was too busy comparing it to the iPhone that I didn't get the full enjoyment out of them.
    The Moto X has changed my view of what a smartphone should be. You described everything perfectly so I won't repeat all of it.
    It fits in the hand beautifully, performs flawlessly without lag, and the touch free system is incredible, as well as the 'breathing' display.
    People who judge the phone based off specs, are truly missing out on something special.

    Your statement that this is the iPhone of the android world is spot on. The Moto x gives Apple a reason to go back to the drawing board.
    I am starting to believe that Apple is loosing it's magic. Maybe it died with Steve Jobs. They seem more worried about a rainbow interface and flat icons than actually doing any real innovation like the Moto X.
    Thank you.
    10-23-2013 02:02 PM
  13. bsalamon's Avatar
    I have the Samsung S4 and have grown tired with the interface so I am shopping the Moto X as a replacement. Phone Scoop mentioned that the output when connected to bluetooth head phones was very low. Do you have any experience that you can share with regard to listening to music over a bluetooth headset. If so was the volume sufficient. I would be using the LG tone plus headphones. Thanks!
    11-13-2013 05:20 PM
  14. Ry's Avatar
    I have the Samsung S4 and have grown tired with the interface so I am shopping the Moto X as a replacement. Phone Scoop mentioned that the output when connected to bluetooth head phones was very low. Do you have any experience that you can share with regard to listening to music over a bluetooth headset. If so was the volume sufficient. I would be using the LG tone plus headphones. Thanks!
    I use the Motorola S10-HD. Audio output for music/media is loud and clear.
    11-14-2013 02:23 PM

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