09-08-2016 11:13 AM
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  1. pool_shark's Avatar
    Agreed. I've never used a device with curved edges, but seeing the complaints about text wrapping combined with frailty, it seems like more of a hassle than a feature.

    Flat screen for sure. The 879 price places it well out of my range until preowned units start popping up on Swappa or Ebay. I can't imagine a Note 8 being in the $900 ballpark.
    I'm inclined to agree. They haven't lost my confidence, things happen. Auto recalls happen regularly even with high end vehicles, but the reports of how easily the device cracks or scratches, along with the text wrapping is not something I want to experience for myself at any price.
    09-08-2016 10:39 AM
  2. edubb256's Avatar
    LOL. There are still people in these very forums still using their Note phones like nothing happened, and the level of awareness can't get any higher than here.

    No sure there is much Samsung can do about that.
    If someone is still using the phone like nothing happened (I am one of those). It may not be stubbornness or unwillingness to listen to warnings. It may be simply an analysis of the risk, given the information available.

    Samsung has not quantified the risk other than to say there have been 40ish reported cases. Given my analysis of risk associated with this, the risk is low and not worth the inconvenience of changing my usage or taking a temporary exchange, until the replacements come out. Some people take the attitude that if there is any risk at all, you should avoid it. I (and most people) do things in my everyday life that have significantly higher risk. I will exchange it once the new ones are available, but for now I continue to use it exactly the way it did before I heard about the battery issue. That said, if new information came out suggesting a higher risk, I would certainly reconsider.
    09-08-2016 10:47 AM
  3. tk-093's Avatar
    They identified a problem and are fixing it. They are not ignoring it like Apple does... They have nothing to regain IMO.
    09-08-2016 10:52 AM
  4. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    If someone is still using the phone like nothing happened (I am one of those). It may not be stubbornness or unwillingness to listen to warnings. It may be simply an analysis of the risk, given the information available.

    Samsung has not quantified the risk other than to say there have been 40ish reported cases. Given my analysis of risk associated with this, the risk is low and not worth the inconvenience of changing my usage or taking a temporary exchange, until the replacements come out. Some people take the attitude that if there is any risk at all, you should avoid it. I (and most people) do things in my everyday life that have significantly higher risk. I will exchange it once the new ones are available, but for now I continue to use it exactly the way it did before I heard about the battery issue. That said, if new information came out suggesting a higher risk, I would certainly reconsider.
    Hey I'm not judging, I think people should do what is best and make their own decisions after weighing the risks. Maybe 96 percent of phones will be fine until the replacements are ready for exchange. No one can know for sure.

    I was just saying that Samsung can't force people to consider the risk if they choose not to.
    09-08-2016 10:58 AM
  5. armiof1's Avatar
    Hello there,
    Long time reader, first time post-er. I just sent this to Samsung. I know some (most) may disagree, but I felt it needed to be said after spending countless hours reading about the note and modifying it.

    Dear Samsung,

    I am contacting you regarding several issues I have had with Samsung recently. Normally I do not do this, but I have never had this much trouble with a company for whom I have purchased multiple devices and accessories.

    My first issue is the Note 7. I completely understand that mistakes happen and I will credit Samsung for quickly announcing a recall. However, my praise ends there. No one knows when we will get our new devices. All of the carriers are in the dark, while there are new cases of the Note 7 exploding seemingly everyday. The best the consumer has is to go to forums (like androidcentral.com) and read through all of the issues consumers are having and the mixed information being presented by all parties, including Samsung! Additionally, the best Samsung has offered is the ability to swap devices, and a measly $25 gift card if we elect to stay with Samsung. How about a warranty to show that Samsung is willing to stand by their products for a full two or even 3 years? If you want to inspire confidence in Samsung, then show us that you believe in your own products. While you’re at it, include screens in the free warranty. Apple just announced yesterday that their warranty includes TWO (!) screen replacements with their 2 year warranty for only $99 and a $29 deductible for each screen. This bring me to my next point: the Note 7 itself.

    The Note 7 is flush with software installed by carriers (pronounced bloatware) that, best case, can be disabled, but never uninstalled. Additionally, you have let Verizon install a piece of software called DT ignite which allows them to install any app on the consumers phone they would like. How is that secure? Apple doesn’t do that. You are large enough that you can tell these carriers, not just no, but ‘HELL NO!’ Instead I am stuck with a phone with which I can never remove certain apps. Speaking of software, there is no reason why a phone that costs almost $900 USD before tax should ever be this slow and full of lag. I have had to spend hours reading how to DISABLE features to optimize my own phone. While I appreciate that ability, why did I have to disable advertised features (animations) to make my phone work in an acceptable manner. I say acceptable because I have had to disable all transition animations to get rid of the lag, and I liked those animations. Additionally, the screen on time is typically less than 5 hours for a phone that has a tremendously large battery. Where is the software optimization?

    While on the subject of the phone, how about we discuss this curved display? It’s a great feature. Truly aesthetically pleasing. Yet multiple videos show how week the edges are, thus predisposing them to cracking easier than the rest of the display. This is quite obviously an engineering flaw. Additionally, numerous videos and articles have illustrated that the glass on the back is significantly weaker than the glass on the front. Why is this? There is no excuse in a $900 device for these issues to occur.

    I also have a Samsung Gear Fit 2 as part of the promotion. It is terrible. My fitbit is far more accurate in counting steps and monitoring heart rate. My fitbit also calculates calories far better. The spotify app is awful. I figured I would read more forums, and come to find that this issue is everywhere. There is no software update out to fix this, even though it was supposed to have been fixed in the last update. If this weren’t a promotion, then I would return it. However I am stuck with it.

    Finally, what prompted me to write this email in the first place: Samsung Pay. The first day I used Samsung Pay I received the promotional $20 gift card. As noted above, I noticed considerable lag and read on one of the forums that loading information using Samsung Smart Switch may have been a cause of considerable lag. So I performed a hard reset. I quickly found that I lost my gift card. Now I understand that, for safety reasons, Samsung Pay only secures information on the device. I called Samsung almost two weeks ago and informed them of this. They kindly said they would elevate the issue and I should have it in a few days. I called again last week. Same issue. This time she provided me with a ticket: ----. Still nothing today, almost two weeks later. I access the online customer support and the rep tells me that they cannot help me. Why is this the case? Also, why is Samsung customer support so fractured and slow?

    I have owned the Galaxy S5, Galaxy S6, and now the Note 7. The S5 was great until marshmallow, the S6 was always terrible, and the Note 7 was supposed to be my solution to a great phone I had wanted all along. Instead it has been one issue after another. That has been my entire experience with Samsung: one issue after another. I just wanted a phone that works without having to get an iPhone. I wanted a phone that was secure, even against carriers installing bloatware. I wanted a phone with great hardware, great software, and great battery life. I thought I had found it in the Note 7, and if it weren’t for terrible customer support and terrible software then I would have been content with the Note 7, even with the battery recall mess (which, again, I praise you for responding so quickly to, but the paucity of information about replacements has made it unbearable). As it stands now I am strongly weighing my other options, even the new iPhone 7.

    I would like to take one second to let you know that I am not entirely dissatisfied with Samsung. You have some of the best hardware out there. The screen is top notch, the camera is great, waterproofing is amazing, expandable storage, stylus, design, wireless charging. The list goes on (though I do wish you had included the latest process, more ram, and perhaps quickcharge 3.0).

    Thank you for your time,
    mikecol likes this.
    09-08-2016 11:00 AM
  6. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    ....
    Its like, we warned you X amount of times that this could happen, and you still did not heed the warning.
    But the fact is Samsung has NOT warned people, even once, to stop using their phone, because their phone could be a ticking time. By issuing a recall with no warning, people think Samsung is being overly cautious. Some people will, therefore, ignore the recall completely, let alone use common sense which tells you to immediately stop using your phone, because there is no way to predict which phone will be the next to explode.

    Whether people listen or not to a warning, they need to be told not to use their phone and not to ignore the warning. They need to be told that ignoring the warning could cost their life or the life of a loved one. This could be done with another text message.
    Law2138 likes this.
    09-08-2016 11:01 AM
  7. edubb256's Avatar
    I agree.

    Maybe 96 percent of phones will be fine until the replacements are ready for exchange. No one can know for sure.
    Yes, no one can know for sure, but assuming 50 have failed so far and another 500 fail in the next 2 weeks, before the replacements are out, that would mean that over 99.9%, of the 2.5 million did not fail.
    09-08-2016 11:12 AM
  8. Almeuit's Avatar
    We are going to close this thread down instead of having multiple threads open with different thread titles but all discussing the same topic pretty much (the battery issue with the Note 7). You can still discuss this issue but please use the main thread below. We don't need a new thread for each story / news article / things of that nature as it really clutters up the forum with the same topic spread out across these threads.

    http://forums.androidcentral.com/sam...sion-here.html

    Thanks.
    09-08-2016 11:13 AM
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