11-04-2016 07:39 AM
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  1. robber's Avatar
    Just as an FYI, if you're going to continue to propagate false numbers despite your continued awareness that those numbers are fictitious, we're going to start treating that as trolling.
    At this point I am not sure why AC is even allowing these sorts of threads. Keep a single thread open to discuss returns, and lock down everything else.
    TeamPowerstroke likes this.
    10-26-2016 09:47 AM
  2. Allnicksgone's Avatar
    Amazing to me that so many people have made a decision to carry around a recalled device running Marshmallow, potentially endangering other people because they don't think a S7edge, V20, Moto or Pixel is good enough for them. For me, I would never do that just for the risk of being "the guy" who created some sort of situation by ignoring Samsung and the CPSC. It is an automatic nationally publicized ***** award trophy waiting to happen.

    I am playing with a Pixel XL and V20 right now, and they are viable options. I took both off the charger last night at 100% before bed. This morning the Pixel is reading 99%, and the v20 97%. This is after 8+ hours standby. Try to replicate that with a Samsung device. Also, these devices, especially the Pixel- are so much more fluid that the note.

    Technology is already moving on.
    I think the Pixel and V20 are both good options.

    Unfortunately, Verizon won't allow me those options without paying full price, even though I bought the Note 7 at 2 year contract price.

    I refuse to pay an extra $500+ to switch the recalled phone with an adequate replacement.
    10-26-2016 09:48 AM
  3. daiwolf's Avatar
    At this point I am not sure why AC is even allowing these sorts of threads. Keep a single thread open to discuss returns, and lock down everything else.
    I agree I get you folks love the note 7 and believe me I wanted one but don't be stupid and keep the phones cause eventually the note 7 will be blocked so why risk hurting yourself or others with the phone? Cause if your phones does catch fire you can't blame samsung. The only one to blame is yourselves for not returning it.
    OK rant is done Come on note 8!
    10-26-2016 11:17 AM
  4. From A Buick 8's Avatar
    Still keeping mine, still believe the faulty devises are a small percentage of the Note7's produced.
    10-26-2016 11:28 AM
  5. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    Just as an FYI, if you're going to continue to propagate false numbers despite your continued awareness that those numbers are fictitious, we're going to start treating that as trolling.
    Trolling? 1 million recalled in the US alone. That's not me saying it, that's the article.

    https://www.google.com/amp/amp.usato...tory/91876162/
    10-26-2016 11:39 AM
  6. Almeuit's Avatar
    Trolling? 1 million recalled in the US alone. That's not me saying it, that's the article.

    https://www.google.com/amp/amp.usato...tory/91876162/
    If I am speaking properly you said...

    Ill say it again- 35 reported cases against 1 million sold phones.
    Your own article you provided for evidence says otherwise.
    10-26-2016 11:42 AM
  7. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    Trolling? 1 million recalled in the US alone. That's not me saying it, that's the article.

    https://www.google.com/amp/amp.usato...tory/91876162/
    Now I may have been wrong about the "35" cases, it's actually 90.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/n...ones/90427540/
    10-26-2016 11:43 AM
  8. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    If I am speaking properly you said...



    Your own article you provided for evidence says otherwise.
    Just corrected it.
    10-26-2016 11:43 AM
  9. Aquila's Avatar
    Trolling? 1 million recalled in the US alone. That's not me saying it, that's the article.

    https://www.google.com/amp/amp.usato...tory/91876162/
    Just shy of a million phones were recalled, but less than 500,000 were ever in the hands of consumers in the US. As of mid September there were 92 reports filed with the CPSC - since that time, in the last 6 weeks, there have been even more. In conjunction with the CPSC, Samsung acknowledges 114 total failures in US models. So 35 and 1,000,000 are both fictitious numbers and this has been pointed out in numerous threads over the course of the last several weeks.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    10-26-2016 11:51 AM
  10. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    Just shy of a million phones were recalled, but less than 500,000 were ever in the hands of consumers in the US. As of mid September there were 92 reports filed with the CPSC - since that time, in the last 6 weeks, there have been even more. In conjunction with the CPSC, Samsung acknowledges 114 total failures in US models. So 35 and 1,000,000 are both fictitious numbers and this has been pointed out in numerous threads over the course of the last several weeks.
    Where is this link that points to your numbers? All I can find are the 2.5 million sold in the world and the 1 million of that 2.5 that was recalled in the US.
    Viscomi4444 likes this.
    10-26-2016 11:56 AM
  11. LeoRex's Avatar
    Now I may have been wrong about the "35" cases, it's actually 90.

    Samsung recalls 1M Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones

    Ok...90....in a very short amount of time. Now, did 100% of the defective phones fail already, leaving the world with completely safe Note 7s? Or did only some fraction of those that are susceptible fail? My money is on just a fraction, and a small one at that. Now, we don't know the root cause, so there's no way to determine if the failure rate would decrease or increase with time.... but it wouldn't take much for that '90 out of' number to get at least a zero added on to it.

    But its all moot. Samsung canceled the phone, CPSC issued a recall and its being banned at more and more places each and every passing minute. At this point, the percentages are academic. Phone's toast in more ways than one.
    10-26-2016 11:59 AM
  12. From A Buick 8's Avatar
    So if we take all of those failures at face value, then that is a failure of 0.0228%

    For me that is A small number of failures

    Even if we add 1000 more failures it only takes it up to 0.2228%
    Viscomi4444 likes this.
    10-26-2016 12:00 PM
  13. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    Just shy of a million phones were recalled, but less than 500,000 were ever in the hands of consumers in the US. As of mid September there were 92 reports filed with the CPSC - since that time, in the last 6 weeks, there have been even more. In conjunction with the CPSC, Samsung acknowledges 114 total failures in US models. So 35 and 1,000,000 are both fictitious numbers and this has been pointed out in numerous threads over the course of the last several weeks.
    So, if my math is correct, we're talking around a .02% rate, right?
    From A Buick 8 likes this.
    10-26-2016 12:03 PM
  14. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    So if we take all of those failures at face value, then that is a failure of 0.0228%

    For me that is A small number of failures

    Even if we add 1000 more failures it only takes it up to 0.2228%
    So to use the correct numbers. Less than 500k were in the hands of consumers in the US. I'll say 450k. 114 failed. I'll use 200.
    200÷450k= .000444×100= .044%.

    That's the exaggerated numbers with more failures and less phones. Still less than 1%. I'm with you.
    From A Buick 8 likes this.
    10-26-2016 12:09 PM
  15. Aquila's Avatar
    So, if my math is correct, we're talking around a .02% rate, right?
    For the US, pretty close yet - very tiny amount. The problem is that the number is many times what is considered "normal". But it's still a very tiny percentage.
    10-26-2016 12:16 PM
  16. Bcool's Avatar
    Just shy of a million phones were recalled, but less than 500,000 were ever in the hands of consumers in the US. As of mid September there were 92 reports filed with the CPSC - since that time, in the last 6 weeks, there have been even more. In conjunction with the CPSC, Samsung acknowledges 114 total failures in US models. So 35 and 1,000,000 are both fictitious numbers and this has been pointed out in numerous threads over the course of the last several weeks.
    It is wrong to include the full 92 they mention. Those were on the original Note 7's. The number of replacements have been much smaller as the article alludes to (bolded below). Further of the instances following the recall, there is no breakdown between Note 7's that were original or were exchanged. Enough with the hysteria. And even when one does fail it is more of a meltdown than a fire and certainly no explosion. Enough with people pretending we're carrying around a nuclear bomb in our pockets. We are all at greater risk of personal injury in our cars on our way home. Why are people even coming in here if they don't have a Note 7? Samsung can't even confirm its a problem with the phone. Probably either user error (or damage) or people looking for a buck without working for it. Maybe everyone should power down and turn in their cellular phones and only use landlines since all of these battery types face combustion risks.


    Galaxy Note 7 Recall: Production Suspended After Explosions | Digital Trends

    In the weeks since, at least three owners of replacement Note 7s, in Minnesota, Kentucky and on a Southwest Air flight that had to be evacuated, reported fires with their replacement device.

    “Samsung has received 96 reports of batteries in Note 7 phones overheating in the U.S., including 23 new reports since the September 15 recall announcement,” according to the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). “Samsung has received 13 reports of burns and 47 reports of property damage associated with Note 7 phones.”
    10-26-2016 01:16 PM
  17. Almeuit's Avatar
    So to use the correct numbers. Less than 500k were in the hands of consumers in the US. I'll say 450k. 114 failed. I'll use 200.
    200÷450k= .000444×100= .044%.

    That's the exaggerated numbers with more failures and less phones. Still less than 1%. I'm with you.
    Jerry explains in nice detail here on how even if it is this small it is way greater than manufactures "accept" as a normal failure rate. -- http://forums.androidcentral.com/sam...ml#post5523158
    Aquila and NotAnAppleGuy like this.
    10-26-2016 01:18 PM
  18. Bcool's Avatar
    Now I may have been wrong about the "35" cases, it's actually 90.

    Samsung recalls 1M Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones
    Pretty sure the number of replacements that "melted" is lower than 35. Not sure how many people replaced their Note 7 so not sure what the denominator would be. The 7 listed below are worldwide, 3 in the US.


    We’re up to seven reports of “safe” Galaxy Note 7s exploding [Update #3] | Ars Technica

    •A "safe" Note 7 that caught fire on a parked Southwest Flight, triggering an evacuation of the airplane.
    •A "safe" Note 7 filled a Kentucky bedroom with smoke at 4am, sending the owner to the hospital after he started vomiting "a lot of black stuff."
    •A "safe" Note 7 melted in Minnesota and burned a 13-year-old girl's hand.
    •A "safe" Note 7 exploded in Taiwan while inside a woman's pants pocket.
    •A Note 7 caught fire in a South Korean baseball stadium. The owner says the unit is "a new one."
    •A Note 7 caught fire in a South Korean Burger King. It's unknown if it's a replacement or not, but the majority of devices in South Korea have been replaced.
    10-26-2016 01:25 PM
  19. Aquila's Avatar
    To be clear, the point isn't to get into the weeds of the stats - but to make sure that everyone is getting the best information available for how to escape this situation with their wallet and sanity intact. As I said in another thread, I can't make you keep it or return it, but if you do choose to keep it, I sincerely hope your device doesn't become one we read about. The point isn't to force people to do anything, keep, return, smash with a rock - that's all up to each individual. For those that choose to return it, we want to have the best information available for them and to have that information easily accessible.
    daiwolf and sweetypie31 like this.
    10-26-2016 01:32 PM
  20. Aquila's Avatar
    At this point I am not sure why AC is even allowing these sorts of threads. Keep a single thread open to discuss returns, and lock down everything else.
    You're not alone in that sentiment, but there is still a lot of confusion about what is going on and what people ought to do. And to me that means there's still a reason to invite more discussion. The point of the forums is to have those discussions - as opposed to say, a blog post, where we can spell out "here are the known facts and here's what you ought to do". The editors have more information that the vast majority of us, have better methods of verifying the information that they get and thus can be considered more of a valid authority on the information that they post - while here, we are all basically just a bunch of nerds with various opinions, and various levels of standards of evidence that we hold our arguments to, shouting into space and (hopefully) trying to improve our understanding of the various nerdy things we discuss.
    10-26-2016 01:42 PM
  21. Bcool's Avatar
    To be clear, the point isn't to get into the weeds of the stats - but to make sure that everyone is getting the best information available for how to escape this situation with their wallet and sanity intact. As I said in another thread, I can't make you keep it or return it, but if you do choose to keep it, I sincerely hope your device doesn't become one we read about. The point isn't to force people to do anything, keep, return, smash with a rock - that's all up to each individual. For those that choose to return it, we want to have the best information available for them and to have that information easily accessible.
    Sure I understand, ie 7 replacements (show me if there is better information) out of >1 million. Also as far as the travel ban is concerned, see below. Perhaps a day is coming no cellular phones are allowed on flights. NOTE the date of the article - 10/19/15.

    The Federal Aviation Administration is getting the word out: Airplanes and lithium batteries don't mix.

    This might seem alarmist given how ubiquitous these batteries have become. Lithium-ion powers our phones, our computers, and even our cars. But on a moving aircraft they could be deadly, the agency said this month. The risk is that, if left unattended, the batteries could overheat and burst into flames, and that in the confines of a cargo hold a battery fire could spread so quickly that it could overpower existing fire-suppression systems.






    This is no idle threat, either. There was been multiple reports of lithium battery-related fires on cargo planes. And one (unsubstantiated) theory about the mysterious disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 last March focuses on the fact that the jet was carrying a large shipment of lithium-ion.

    The FAA Is Freaked Out About Lithium-Ion Batteries on Planes
    10-26-2016 01:42 PM
  22. Aquila's Avatar
    ie 7 replacements (show me if there is better information) out of >1 million.
    The best information I was given was that there were approximately 900,000 original devices with less than 500,000 in the wild, (of which over 450,000 were returned or never sold) and very close to 300,000 replacements in the US. Though someone who I believe has better information than me has suggested that it could be as many as 300,00 to 500,000 replacements and about 700,000 originals. So my numbers add up to 800k million total devices in the US (500k old + 300k new) and their numbers range from 1.0 million to 1.2 million total devices (700k old + 300-500k new). My impression is that the 300k-500k number represents 500k shipments and around 300k sold.
    10-26-2016 02:00 PM
  23. Jaycemiskel's Avatar
    Jerry explains in nice detail here on how even if it is this small it is way greater than manufactures "accept" as a normal failure rate. -- http://forums.androidcentral.com/sam...ml#post5523158
    Yeah, I read his post. It's way greater than the accepted rate but it's still so low that I'm not concerned, especially since they can't even recreate it. I'm cool with it not being allowed on public transportation. I don't use public transportation anyway. I just think people are overblowing how much of a risk it is.
    10-26-2016 02:06 PM
  24. Aquila's Avatar
    I just think people are overblowing how much of a risk it is.
    From a perspective of "how likely is it?" you're probably correct here. But from a perspective of, "how much MORE likely is it than ____?", it is so much more likely that it needs to be taken into account. Everyone has to make a call on what they feel is an acceptable level of risk for themselves and act accordingly - but to me it's a question of, "Given that phone A is X times more likely than phone B to injure me or cause undue stress dealing with other aspects of this type failure, so, given my desire to not deal with that kind of stuff, is it reasonable for me to accept this risk?" To me, it definitely is not worth that risk. To others, the device is good enough and their tolerance for dealing with that stuff may be higher and they're going to say the trade off is worth it. If Samsung does some of the stuff people say they might do to encourage returns, that decision may get reconsidered.
    jgraves1107 and Jaycemiskel like this.
    10-26-2016 02:18 PM
  25. NotAnAppleGuy's Avatar
    The best information I was given was that there were approximately 900,000 original devices with less than 500,000 in the wild, (of which over 450,000 were returned or never sold) and very close to 300,000 replacements in the US. Though someone who I believe has better information than me has suggested that it could be as many as 300,00 to 500,000 replacements and about 700,000 originals. So my numbers add up to 800k million total devices in the US (500k old + 300k new) and their numbers range from 1.0 million to 1.2 million total devices (700k old + 300-500k new). My impression is that the 300k-500k number represents 500k shipments and around 300k sold.
    I still ask for the link that states these numbers. All the info I am able to extract says "2.5 million sold worldwide" and "1 million recalled in the US."
    10-26-2016 02:39 PM
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