Best Settings for Pro Mode for Action Shots

debond604

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I have used the Auto mode and pics came out pretty good, I would really like to try and use Pro Mode for action shots, such as the dog and kids playing in the yard, can anyone give me some suggestions for how to get good action shots since there is no sports mode? I always have my phone with me, but don't usually take a camera out with me. Any suggestions would be helpful.
 

BlackZeppelin

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Apr 20, 2014
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Hey there. I'm assuming outside photos on good light. It's really simple. Firstly, you select F2.4 instead of F1.5. BUT if you're dealing enough low light, then go back to F1.5.

Then select a low ISO. If plenty of light, you can go down to ISO 50. You'll still get good detail of you go up to 250.

Then select your shutter speed. A high speed of say 1/1000 sec or more. I'm manual mode you can go to a staggering 1/24000 sec.

So depending on light, you adjust your ISO and shutter speed. In lower light bring your ISO up to a maximum to give still good detail whilst still maintaining high shutter speed.
 

debond604

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Thank you so much! I will try this. I can get good pictures in Auto mode, but anything with movement has been blurred. So this should really help!
 

Rukbat

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Blurred movement means a slow shutter, so you want the shutter as fast as possible - shutter priority in camera terms.

Then I'd keep the ISO up around 400 all the time (unless a night shot is so dark that you need it higher). Even in sunlight. a shutter speed of 1/24000 should be enough that you'd need to open the lens all the way (f1.5).

Use the lens opening and EV to set the exposure. But ... if you need depth of field (child near, dog far, that sort of thing), you'll hve to stop the lens down, so play with the ISO to make up for the lower light coming in.

Photography is photography, whether it's a $50 phone camera or a $5,000 Hasselblad. Larger lens opening fives you more light but less depth of field. Faster shutter stops motion but gives you less light. Higher ISO, whether it's a higher ISO film or a higher ISO setting, "sees" better with less light. (The only difference is that in a digital camera, higher ISO means possible graininess, so don't get ridiculous just because the camera can get good pictures when it's so dark that you can't see.)
 

Chromium 4

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I find that I do not have problems with blurry shots when AF Tracking is toggled on when in auto. I also find that the camera takes good action shots in pro mode in auto where I allow the camera adjust the settings itself