Phones with high failure rate

Golfdriver97

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Not on the list, but seeing Samsung there isn't surprising either.
 

Theot

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Every manufacturer is going to have failures but man that's bad on Samsung.

The iPhone being on there doesn't surprise me, my wife loves her damn iPhones but 12-14 months in she always starts having hardware issues. Speaker, mic, buttons, battery, etc have all failed. Best one she had was the iPhone 5, that thing took multiple dips in water and never missed a beat in almost three years and we sold it still working.
 

andrew_ackley

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mustang7757

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Every manufacturer is going to have failures but man that's bad on Samsung.

The iPhone being on there doesn't surprise me, my wife loves her damn iPhones but 12-14 months in she always starts having hardware issues. Speaker, mic, buttons, battery, etc have all failed. Best one she had was the iPhone 5, that thing took multiple dips in water and never missed a beat in almost three years and we sold it still working.

Same with my wife's iPhones lol
 

mustang7757

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Im assuming this is world wide???They sell a bazillion Samsung's. It's more about volume than everything else. What I'm suprised about is the crazy low amount for huawei despite being what number 3 manufacturer in the world?

True ...but their Nexus 6p was a bust too many problems I had with that phone
 

Theot

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Im assuming this is world wide???They sell a bazillion Samsung's. It's more about volume than everything else. What I'm suprised about is the crazy low amount for huawei despite being what number 3 manufacturer in the world?
Yeah but that's a stupid high failure rate, I don't care how many they make.
 

mustang7757

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I put her on Jump with our T-Mobile plan this year with the iPhone 8. If I'm going to pay for insurance and apple Care anyway she might as well just upgrade the dang thing yearly.

The same I did with mywife put insurance on her phones...she always breaks the screens that's what happened to her 8plus that's getting fixed now she's using my iPhone x which I keep slim case and temper glass. .I had to go out and buy a heavy duty case for her to use it lol
 

cwbcpa

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

I've been pretty fortunate over the years. I've never had a phone fail on me. A lot of Samsung, Motorola, LG, HTC, Apple and probably a few I'm forgetting. Worse thing I have had was a failed home button on an iPhone 5s and they replaced the phone even though it was just out of the one year warranty.

I don't think too much about these lists. I suppose they could or should factor in on making a phone choice but they just don't carry much weight in my decision.
 

Golfdriver97

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Only there cause they sell more phones than anyone else in the world.
And that was my line of thinking. Since the list of specific devices consisted of the flagships, too. When you crank out as much as Samsung does, it isn't surprising.

I should have made myself clear earlier. Last second post before my break ended.
 

Dooki

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Only there cause they sell more phones than anyone else in the world.

depends on how they gauged it. If they do it by strait percentage then it will be accurate, but if by total numbers then that is misleading.

I am on my third Note 8 because of factory defects
 

chyeo1979

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Failure rate means what? Phone totally dead or any kind of defects? Some people bring their phones back for the smallest thing while some have high tolerance over minor defect
 

Gary02468

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Failure rate means what? Phone totally dead or any kind of defects? Some people bring their phones back for the smallest thing while some have high tolerance over minor defect
If you read the actual report, it says "failure rate" is "the number of mobile phones that showed some sort of diagnostics issue during testing". Moreover, the testing was not conducted on a random sample of phones. Rather, many of the phones were sent for testing precisely because of suspected problems--to varying extents in different places.

In other words, those numbers are not actual failure rates and tell us nothing about actual failure rates.
 

Itsa_Me_Mario

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Re: Is your phone on the high failure list?

Please note that the stats as depicted in the "study" and as regurgitated by AA are OBVIOUSLY false. The original source says that Samsung in Q2 2017 had a failure rate of 61%, which is CLEARLY false, as it would mean 3 out of 5 phones were failing in some way. Real failure rates typically are less than 1% of 1%, and are expressed as percentages using 2 or 3 significant figures. Example: 0.0054% or 0.00536% when they're being reported as a percentage of population - however it should be noted that the industry does not calculate that way - instead they use what's known as the MTBF, or mean time between failures, which is able to describe the expected failure rate through time - given that devices that are brand new are expected to fail less than those that are already 3-5 years old. Typically you would see those rates either expressed as failures per million (hours) or, with electronic components, you may instead see failures per billion hours. As an example, if Samsung tested 2000 devices for up to 2000 hours each and had 5 failures, with a total testing time of 3,859,410 hours, the calculation would be 5/3859410 = 1.3*10[SUP]-6[/SUP] or 1.3 failures for every million hours of operation. Note those numbers are made up, I don't know Samsung's actual failure rate for devices as a whole or for their components - and neither did the source used for this article, nor the authors of this article.
 

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