Final Soultion: Why Most HEADSETS WON'T WORK

metle_geek

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Jul 26, 2013
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I'd like to know what size resistor to use from mic to ground for a moto x

I have a moto x that i need to call a conference line then attach a cable to the head phone jack of a sound system. Below is what I have made up.

I now have a cable with a 3.5mm trs on one end and I installed a 3.5 mm trrs on the other end with a 1/2 watt 4.7 kohm resistor and ground to s and other end of resistor to r and right to r and left to t which works great sometimes but sometimes I have to wait 10 sec to 60 sec for it to connect.

I have a HTC one cable made up 3.5mm trs on one end and installed a 3.5mm trrs on other end with 1/2 watt 4.7 kohm resistor to s and ground and other end of resistor to r and right to r and left to t
and it works instantly every time i plug it in

I was wondering if moto x needs a different resistor. Can anyone help me
Thanks

You might need a compositor as the voltage is different the one X might simply have more current and it has that lag as its warming up like a tube amplifier lol

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using AC Forums mobile app
 

YossiD

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I have an old AD-54 Nokia audio controller (detailed description here) that I'd like to try to adapt for my Samsung phone.

All of the controls are there, and it even has a clip.

Of course it doesn't work as-is with my Galaxy so I figure it's mostly a matter of changing the connections. Does anyone know where I can find a schematic for the connections to control a Galaxy phone via the headphone connector?

I can post this as a new topic, but the people on this thread seem to be the right ones for this question.

TIA
 

anon9020882

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Very very smart. nice man. that means, if i wanna use the mic during a call, i just move the plug up a little bit make the contacts for the mic come together right?? this also leads me to understand that i will loose one of the audio channels. Again, if im right
 

lahma

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Do you describe all of the various proprietary Android connectors interfaces as elitist too?
Why do you expect Apple to make interfaces for anything other than their phones? Apple is pretty big on sound quality which is why they specify such things.

I know this is an old thread that is dead at this point, but I really couldn't resist replying to your totally ignorant, typical-Apple cult worshiping moronic comment. If you would like to defend yourself (which you obviously cannot do without making yourself out to be even more ignorant), please give me an example of what these "various proprietary Android connectors" are. "Why would expect Apple to make interfaces for anything other than their own phones?" For the same exact reason that I expect the house I move into to use a standard AC socket, a standard coaxial cable jack, a standard RJ11 telephone jack, and a standard RJ45 Ethernet jack. This really doesn't take a genius to figure out. Furthermore, you state that "Apple is pretty big on sound quality" and that is the reason "they specify such things". You really should learn how to use a search engine to educate yourself a bit before giving such responses that make you out to be an *****. Swapping the location of the ground from a middle ring on the 3.5mm jack to the bottom of the connector and changing the impedance of the inline controller does not have a SINGLE thing to do with audio quality. All of these crazy things that Apple does is purely for profit, to lock you into their ecosystem, or to force manufacturers to pay them to create compatible products because they own patents on them. There are so many examples of this I can't even begin to list them... but just to give one more example in addition to the ones already stated here, Apple products are not compatible with any STANDARD Bluetooth accessories (except Bluetooth LE) because their devices refuse to connect to them if they do not contain an Apple patented authentication chip that verifies that the manufacturer has paid the tens-to-hundreds of thousands of dollars that Apple requires them to pay to put such a chip in their devices. Hell, you should be grateful Apple doesn't use a proprietary AC socket for their chargers that you are forced to buy an adapter for before you can plug it into your wall. Grow up and quit defending Apple like they are your infallible god...
 

rrolland

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Thanks for the final solution. I spent an hour online with Samsung chat customer support trying to figure out why my Plantronics headset would work fine on my laptop but not on my Galaxy 6.
He went so far as to have me reboot safe mode and try to identify apps with problems.
He swore, when I asked, that Samsung used a standard audio/mic jack.
Thanks again, R
 

PinkiePieHugs

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God, this bickering is insane...

OMTP and CTIA are equally valid pinout standards, and neither is Apple proprietary. OMTP is long gone, but included manufacturers like Nokia and Samsung. CTIA is a much larger trade organization - and it includes, you got it, Nokia and Samsung among others (including, yes, Apple).

The 3.5 mm TRRS connector has no official standards, so to say either one is right isn't valid, but CTIA is a MUCH larger group that includes the entire mobile industry, essentially. OMTP consisted of a much smaller group of hardware manufacturers. This is not an Apple proprietary thing, and never was historically. It's more like when Apple was one of the first to adopt USB - that didn't make USB Apple proprietary. They picked the direction standards were going anyway. Lightning is Apple proprietary BS, but using the CTIA pinout isn't.

Now, this is all about getting everything, including the microphone, to work... the remote control is a COMPLETELY SEPARATE ISSUE. This was a mess. But don't confuse it with the distinction between OMTP and CTIA pinouts.
 

tmotley3

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Don't you mean that we should imagine in your explanations that the plug is facing *left*? You wrote:

"In all of the following explanations- imagine that the tip of the plug is facing right.

The standard 3.5mm headphones (no in-line controls on the cable) use the configuration of (from left to right)
TRS- Tip, Ring, Sleeve. The pinout for these connections is: Left Audio, Right Audio, Ground."

If the tip comes first from left to right, then the plug (or jack) is facing left, unless you have a bizarre understanding of "facing." If the female socket of the device (phone or tablet) is to the left of the plug, you would move the jack leftward to put it into the socket. Wouldn't you say that the plug is facing the socket? If so, it's facing left.
 

Alexander88

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how can i use my pc as mic for my smartphone? I need this for call center.. Or, how can i have full control (audio input/output) to smartphone from pc? Thanks !
 

donflyinandroid

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What Shure has done to combat this epidemic
Our friends at the MOTIV team at Shure has come up with an ingenious way of combatting the error many of my friends have innocently made by plugging in their earbuds/mic —or even a high-end Bose headset with mic— with TRRS plug when they weren’t supposed to do that.

Shure headset adapter

Actually, the cable adapter (shown above) that Shure is including with many new digital MOTIV devices solves two problems at once. Here I will paraphrase Shure’s explanation from the user manual:

You often require a slimmer connection to the headphone output on your recording device. The cable adapter accommodates headphones (which may or may not include a microphone, and may be TRS or TRRS) with larger connectors and allows them to plug into the iPad/iPhone/iPod Touch, even through many cases.
The adapter cable will automatically disable the inline microphone that may be present on your earphones or headphones. The adapter cable ensures that the recorded sound comes solely from the Shure MOTIV device and not the microphone of your earphones or headset.
 

Stoshie

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Do you describe all of the various proprietary Android connectors interfaces as elitist too?
Why do you expect Apple to make interfaces for anything other than their phones? Apple is pretty big on sound quality which is why they specify such things.

Apple is big on sound quality? What a joke. They, more than anyone else, popularized the MP3 lossy format for music, and continue to use it as their main format (yes, I know they offer a lossless format, but few people use it).

Apply makes their systems proprietary for one reason, and one reason only - to lock customers into using their products. Open source, non-proprietary formats for interfaces and other things are just as good as what Apple provides; there is no intrinsic qualitative difference between what Apple forces you to use and anything else.
 

Walter Green

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Actually describing Apple as elitist is NOT off the mark. Some were upset by that comment, however switching the sheild for the ring does NOTHING to increase sound quality. Coaxial cables have a woven SHIELD around the audio/IF/RF wires contained within. Having the wires carrying the signals on the inside of the cable with a woven shield isolates them from external signals for radio, TV, and even signals from florescent lighting. Shortening this milimeters has no noticeable effect, but also does not increase sound quality. Also twisting the left, right and mic wires together allows some cross talk between the two channels, so inside of most cables, each channel has it's own shield. Please note I said most. The reason I said this is simply put, cheaper cables often have one shield for all three wires, or just another wire for ground that does not shield the others. Some cables shield the left and right in one shield, and the mic in another. This is a compromise between quality and expense. Having a left and right channel twisted together may cause some cross talk, but since audio in both is very similar most people don't notice any difference. Lastly this is not the only place Apple goes out of their way to be different. Their power plugs have always been different. when Androids adopted the microUSB in stead of the many multitudes of power cords used by phone makers prior to that, Apple needed a smaller micro sized plug too. So what did they do? Did they too adopt the microUSB? NO! They instead design one Wholey incompatible. Apple computers, largely incompatible with Windows or Linux, used only Sonet processors until they could not get processors that could compete with Intel and AMD processors in PCs. So did they bow down and just use Intel chip sets everyone else did? Ummm. Sort of??? They used Intel Processors, even Intel compatible chip sets, but then added a chip that did NOTHING but more or less identified it as a Mac. You could NOT run Mac OS'es on anything BUT a MAC... Why? No reason that seems logical, at the time their computers cost more for the exact same motherboard as a Windows Machine with only that proprietary chip that seemingly does nothing except allow Mac OS identify it as a Mac. If fact if they just would have made Mac OS run on all Intel/AMD machines they might make more money selling Mac OS! The ONLY time in Apple history that I can think of when did NOT make their stuff proprietary was the Apple II. They did not have the resources and started out building those in their home garage!
 

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